Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been reading a lot of posts and given the relative new community of Bolt owners the basics of charging math seem to be coming up quite a bit. In the past I've done similar posts on other EV forums that have been well received. For the new EV owner here are the basics of calculating charging time for your Bolt or other EV car. If you know this already you can safely skip this posting - nothing to see here that you don't already know.

EV batteries are measured in kWH (Kilowatt hours) or 1000 watt-hours - a watt hour is a unit of measure of 1000 watts of a electricity for 1 continuous hour. The Bolt comes with a 60,000 watt-hour battery - or 60 kWh battery. Charging a Bolt battery from empty requires 60,000 watt-hours.

How do I calculate watts?

Turns out the math is simple:

you need to know 2 factors about your electrical supply (or charger).

Volts
AMPs

watts = Volts * AMPS
watt-hours = (Volts * AMPS) + time

In the US electrical circuits are typically either 120v - 120 volts or 240 volts. 120 Volts are a typical wall plug in your home or kitchen or room, most home appliances are 120 volt devices, and 240 volts are typically: ovens, electrical water heaters, electric dryers, air conditioners, hot tubs

(* in the US volts vary for 120 volt from 100-130 volts, and 240 volts vary from 200 to 250 volts - it all depends on your electrical provider, your houses main panel, time of day, overall load on the grid and so on and so forth). For purposes of this posting we're going to use 120 volts and 240 volts which is the "ideal" goal of the US electrical system - your actual watts will vary based on your actual home supply characteristics. If you can measure your home's voltage you can adjust the math below to actual volts and the watt calculations will change slightly.

Electrical Circuits are installed in panels with am AMP rating for different voltages (120 or 240). Typically breakers are rated at peak/temporary load, and continuous load. For continuous load you have to de-rate the breaker by 20% - so a 10 AMP breaker is only rated to deliver 8 AMPs of continuous load. Loading a breaker at more than 80% of it's rating continuously is not recommended and can cause problems.

Charging an EV is considered continuous load (any load for more than 3 hours) so the 80% rule is in effect.

so let's figure out how do we calculate charging time for a given charger for a Bolt.

Typical home Plug - 120 volts on a 15 AMP circuit - derate by 20% - 12 amp continuous load

120 volts * 12 AMPs = 1440 watts or 1.44 kw - do this for one hour at you get 1.44 kilowatt hours

charge the Chevy Bolt from empty with this charging rate and you divide 60 killowatt-hours / 1.44 kilowatt hours = 41.667 hours - that's best case and there is about a 10% loss with the chargers so 41.667 * 1.1 = 45.8 hours - we add a 10% fudge factor to deal with various in-efficiencies in the whole charging infrastructure.

so it will take 46-48 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt from a normal house hold plug @ 12 amps on a typical home 15 AMP circuit.

The Chevy Bolt Default 120 volt setting - 8 AMPS - since many homes were never built with continuous loads in mind - Chevy has taken a conservative approach and defaults the Bolt's 120 volt charging rate to 8 AMPS (or about 50% of a 15 AMP break's load - this is to account for poor plug quality and potentially poor wiring in some homes) - so the math for this default setting to fully charge a Bolt from empty is

120 volts * 8 AMPs = 960 watts or 0.96 kw
60 kwh (volt battery) / .96 kw = 62.5 * 10 % fudge factor = 68.75 hours or there about

some homes/garages have 120 volt / 20 AMP circuits - these are typically used for engine block heaters and use a different plug from the normal household plug - 20 amps * 80% - 16 amp continuous load

120 volts * 16 amps = 1920 watts or 1.92 kilowatts
60 kwh / 1.92 kw = 31.25 hours * 10% fudge factor = *1.1=34.375 hours or about 35-36 hours to charge from a home 120/20 amp circuit - you'd need to find a EV charger for this however because Chevy's charger that comes with the car doesn't support this type of plug/circuit

as you can see 120 volt house hold circuits really don't do the job - to properly charge an EV you typically want to use a 240 volt circuit. To do this there are lots and lots of choices for various EV charges are all sorts of different AMP Ratings. Typically you want to buy an EV charger who's maximum AMP rating matches or exceeds your EV car's charging capability.

The Chevy Bolt can handle up to a 40 AMP circuit, with a 32 AMP continuous draw. So any EV charger up to 40 AMPS will charge your Bolt much faster than your typical 120 volt house hold circuit. Typical 240 volt breakers are: 16 AMP, 24 AMP, 30 AMP, 32 AMP, 40 AMP, 50 AMP, and in increments of 10 AMPS upto 200 AMP circuits (typically a 200 AMP breaker is on most homes for the entire house, most US homes have 80, 100, 125, 150, 200, 400 AMP main whole-house breakers)

Math for charging at 240 volts for various AMPS are:

16 AMP 240 volt breaker - 240 volts * 12.8 AMPS = 3072 watts or 3.072 kw = about 22 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt
20 AMP 240 volt breaker - 240 volts * 16 AMPS = 3840 watts = about 17-18 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt
24 AMP 240 volt breaker - 240 volts * 19.2 AMPS = 4608 watts = about 15-16 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt
30 AMP 240 volt breaker - 240 volts * 24 AMPS = 5760 watts = about 12-13 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt
32 AMP 240 volt breaker - 240 volts * 25.6 AMPS = 6144 watts = about 11-12 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt
40 AMP 240 volt breaker - 240 volts * 32 AMPS = 7680 watts = about 9-10 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt

------------------------------- Bolt can only handle 32 AMPS - math below is for a 50 AMP circuit which may charge other EV's faster, but not the Bolt - since it will only use 32 AMPs regardless of "bigger" AMP ev chargers -------------------------------

50 AMP 240 volt breaker - 240 volts * 40 AMPS = 9600 watts = about 7-8 hours to fully charge an empty Bolt if it could handle a 40 AMP charge rate which it can't.


Typical public chargers on the West coast from Chargepoint network are 208 volts at 30 amps charge rate (I don't know what the breaker is but the car reports 30 amp charge rate) or 6,240 watts.

208 Volts * 30 amps = 9620 watts or 11-12 hours to fully charge an empty volt from your typical J-1772 public charger.

Charging times will be less for actual usage since most people only drive 40-60 miles a day - you can do the math for kWh usage - at 4 miles per kWh for the Bolt - typical 60 mile/day usage = 15 kWh to recharge at the end of the day

running the table for this approximate charge times are as follows at various voltages and charge rates

120v @ 8 amps for 60 miles of driving = approximately 12 hours charge time
120v @ 12 amps for 60 miles of driving = approximately 9 hours charge time
240v @ 16 AMP circuit for 60 miles of driving = approximately 6 hours charge time
240v @ 20 AMP circuit for 60 miles of driving = approximately 5 hours charge time
240v @ 24 AMP circuit for 60 miles of driving = approximately 4 hours charge time
240v @ 30 AMP circuit for 60 miles of driving = approximately 3 hours charge time
240v @ 32 AMP circuit for 60 miles of driving = approximately 3 hours charge time

208v @ 30 AMP charge rate for 60 miles = approximately 2.64 hours charge time - typical J-1772 Public Charger (Charge point)

240v @ 40 AMP circuit for 60 miles of driving = approximately 2 hours charge time

-------------------- Bolt Cut off -------------------- 32 AMPS is maximum charge rate for a Bolt --------------------
240v @ 50 AMP circuit for 60 miles of driving = approximately 1.5 hours charge time

DC Fast Charging is another whole ball of wax - and the typical math there is 400 volts * some number of AMPS - the wattage ranges from 24,000 watts (charge point) to 50,000 watts (evGO) and some DCFast chargers in Europe are going as high as 100,000 watts. The math is a little complicated because you can not charge the battery at the same rate during the entire charge cycle, the closer to full the battery is the slower the charge, you can only pump maximum wattage into the battery when it's close to empty. But basically…

24,000 watts would charge the Bolt from empty to full approximately 2.5 hours
50,000 watts would charge the Bolt from empty to full approximately 1.2 hours
100,000 watts would charge the Bolt from empty to full approximately 0.6 hours or about 40 minutes

keep in mind the numbers above are theoretical and times will likely be longer because you have to taper the charge rate once the battery gets above 80% charge rate you can no longer pump full wattage into the battery - so it will take longer to charge the last 20% than to charge the 1st 80% of a battery

Tesla superchargers are 400 volts * 400 amps and therefore 160,000 watts - so if we had an adapter you could charge a Bolt in 22 minutes - LOL - but again that's theory- and I think the DCFast charging hardware on the Bolt is limited to 60,000 watts so any DCFast charger offering more than that would be ignored by the Bolt and it would only charge at a 60,000 watt level regardless of how much power the charger offered above that.

I hope you've found this posting useful and I _KNOW_ the internet will correct any mistakes (people on forums are ruthless that way - :) ) - I'll be happy to answer any questions and if necessary post any corrections.

Enjoy your Bolt! I'm having super fun with mine!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
doh - math cut/paste error

208 Volts * 30 amps = 9620 watts or 11-12 hours to fully charge an empty volt from your typical J-1772 public charger.

NOT 9620 watts - 6240 watts - the number is wrong, but the hour estimate is correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Keep in mind: just trying to be helpful 0:)

Nice informative post. One concern though: I am a bit worried people (EV newbies) might be led to believe the Bolt will automatically adjust it's charging speed to 80% of the braker capacity. But this is obviously not the case. It all depends on the setting of the (portable) charge station, which may or may not be adjustable. When the default setting is to high and it cannot be adjusted to a low-enough value (less or equal to 80% of braker capacity) you have a serious risk issue (unless your circuit comfortably supports the full 32 amps sustained, of course). When it is adjustable to a low enough value, it still may not be adjustable to exactly 80% of the braker capacity, resulting in a lower charge performance. For example, when you aim to stay below 80% of 24 amps, with many charge stations you probably end up with 16 amps instead of 19.2 amps, resulting in a reduction of charge speed of close to 20%.

Also, do we know the Bolt will indeed take the maximum of what it is allowed to take by he charge station (assuming sufficiently low battery state of charge)? Or does it maybe maintain a safety margin by itself? I have a separate topic running on this matter (http://www.chevybolt.org/forum/82-charging-batteries/7122-l2-charging-how-much-power-drawn-various-settings.html). Any input there would be appreciated.

so it will take longer to charge the last 20% than to charge the 1st 80% of a battery
For my current car (not a Bolt), the last 20% takes about 1 hour out of a total of 3.5 hours. So, yes it goes a lot slower, but I don't think it will really take longer. Semantics, I guess ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Sorry, can’t find the edit button.

I just read the update you did in my ‘own’ thread. To my best of knowledge, here in the Netherlands we never have the option to set the charge station to the braker capacity. So, the charge station will not apply the 80% rule. Charging stations in most cases support a fixed number of steps to choose from (if adjustable at all). Very few are adjustable by 1 amp steps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
The Bolt takes all the available power the EVSE can provide up to the limit of it's internal charger, which appears to be 7.67 kW. Today I measured 7.35 kW going in with a 30A EVSE and a supply voltage of 245.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
Sorry, can’t find the edit button.

I just read the update you did in my ‘own’ thread. To my best of knowledge, here in the Netherlands we never have the option to set the charge station to the braker capacity. So, the charge station will not apply the 80% rule. Charging stations in most cases support a fixed number of steps to choose from (if adjustable at all). Very few are adjustable by 1 amp steps.
I believe that you can only edit your posts if it has been less than 20 minutes since you posted it. Once 20 minutes has passed, the edit button goes bye-bye.

In the US we use a number of different plugs to feed our hungry appliances. The type of plug and receptacle used is supposed to indicate the rating of the breaker feeding the receptacle. A 5-15R means that is a grounded 120V receptacle fed by a 15A breaker. A 5-20R indicates a 20A breaker feeding a grounded 120V receptacle. Most 240V receptacles in a US household are either a 14-30R (used for an electric dryer, fed by a 30A breaker) or a 14-50R used for an electric oven (50A breaker), and these are the ones people typically install in their garages if they are using a portable 240V EVSE. In addition, they all have different blade configurations, so you can't accidentally plug-in an appliance that is designed to draw 50A into a receptacle that is only rated for 30A.

You can see a list of the plugs/receptacles we typically use and their wiring configurations at: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ampera e

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
to be clear @devbolt is correct - the CAR will _NOT_ derate the AMP's from the external charger - that's the external charger's job - NOT the car's job.

some charger's are configurable and have a setting for either the breaker size or charge rate you want them to report. It is your job as the user to make sure your charger does not report/pull more power than the rating of the circuit they are plugged into.

Examples:

Clipper Creek Chargers are _NOT_ configurable - you purchase them at a fixed AMP rating and it's the installer's job to either hard wire them to an appropriate circuit breaker or plug-them into a 240v wall socket that is properly matched to the correct breaker size. You should not install a 40 AMP clipper creek charger onto a 24 AMP circuit - the charger will report it can charge at 40 AMP's and the Bolt will attempt to charge at 32 AMPs - overwhelming the 24 AMP breaker and blowing the circuit (if you're lucky).

The EVSE charger discussed in multiple posts here on the forums is fully configurable and therefore it is the installer/users job to properly configure the EVSE charger to report the correct Amperage to the car. Again do NOT configure your EVSE charger to report 32 AMP charging rate when wired/plugged into a 16 AMP breaker.

The Tesla Wall Connector has a rotary dial/dip-switch that must be configured to the breaker size it's mated to - once you've set your breaker size the Tesla Wall connector charger reports the correct 80% AMP load to the car - thereby avoiding the potential for the car to charge at a rate higher than 80% - but ONLY IF you've properly configured the charger to match the breaker

(and it should go without saying different 240v/AMP loads have different wiring requirements, please DO NOT install higher AMP breakers on wire that is inappropriate for the types of loads you anticipate your charger/car will be using. If necessary and all this is confusing you consult/hire a qualified/licensed/bonded electrician who will install your charger for you and match the charger/breaker/wire so that it's safe and sane. Once the charger is properly installed with correct breaker/wire/charger size the Bolt will happily charge at the maximum rate provided by the charger up to and including 32 AMPS)

The Tesla Universal Mobile Charger (UMC) is "configurable" but indirectly. It configures itself based on what plug-adapter is currently on one end of the charger's wiring. If you have the NEMA 5-15 plug on the adapter the UMC will report 120v/12 AMPs to the car as the maximum charge rate. If you have the NEMA 14-50/6-50 adapter on the charger the charger will report 240v/40 AMPs as the maximum charge rate, at which point the Bolt will attempt to charge at 32 AMPS if plugged in. Via various tricks/tips/adapters you can confuse/trick a Tesla UMC into thinking it's plugged into a 50 AMP circuit when in fact you're only on a 24 AMP circuit. No one, myself included, would recommend doing this and it's unsafe.

When using a home or mobile charger make sure the whole system is correctly configured. Since some chargers can be configured you need to make sure the charger's configuration (via switches or software) is set to the correct setting for the actual physical electrical circuit it is using. Setting an portable EVSE charger to 32 amp setting on an actual 16 AMP circuit will _NOT_ go well - as the Bolt will attempt to pull 32 AMP's and consistently blow the circuit.

The rule is simple. The charging connector (J-1772) has a signaling protocol that reports the charger's capabilities to the car. The car (in this case the Bolt) will charge at what ever charge rate is reported by the external charger (up to 32 AMPs). If the external charger is properly configured/installed then there is _NO_ problem. If the external charger is incorrectly configured it is effectively lying to car about what it can do, and the Bolt will happily attempt to charge at the maximum reported rate (up to 32 amps).

I also believe this conversation is further confused by the availability of AMP override in the Bolt's charging screen for the factory supplied charger of 8 or 12 AMPs. The default Chevy selected for the car is 8 AMPs - this was done because many many older homes are simply not wired for maximum (80%) load for hours on end (48 hours for a full charge anyone?) - so Chevy provided a software override for this _ONE_ case where you as the end user get to select either 8 or 12 amps when charging from a 120 volt source. The charger (in this case the factory chargers provided by Chevy with the car) is reporting it can do 120 volts @ 12 AMPs - the car's charging software then lets you as the owner/operators of the car select either 8 or 12 AMP charge setting, effectively controlling how much the car will draw when plugged into a normal wall socket. Chevy provides no such settings for 240 volt charging sources and therefore the Bolt automatically selects the charge rate of what ever the external charger is reporting. There is also no display showing you what the car has selected.

For now it should all "just" work, but that assumes the external charger you are using is properly installed/configured - and most of the time (98%) it all is properly installed and configured so there is _NO_ need to see the charge settings or adjust them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
my recommendation to Chevy is to modify the Bolt software to:

1. show the current volt's and AMP along with estimated completion time - this is good sanity check when using unfamiliar chargers
2. it would also be nice to see how many kWh are left to charge, and how many kWh have been delivered - progress and status is always appreciated
3. I believe there should be software AMP override in the Bolt so that I can adjust how much the car is drawing from a given source. There are multiple reasons for this, but I've found this setting in other EV's to be useful from time to time. Sometimes I want to charge at a 24 AMP rate even when the external charger can do 32 AMP…an advanced/hidden setting for this would be greatly appreciated
4. charging data mentioned in 1 & 2 above should be reflected in the myChevy app…
5. extra credit for item #3 if it's GPS aware and saved based on location - many times if I've adjusted the AMP draw for charging at a particular charger, next time I'm at the charger I'm going to want the same setting - location based charge settings should save: schedule-preference/charge-rate settings per-location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Keep in mind: just trying to be helpful 0:)

Nice informative post. One concern though: I am a bit worried people (EV newbies) might be led to believe the Bolt will automatically adjust it's charging speed to 80% of the braker capacity. But this is obviously not the case. It all depends on the setting of the (portable) charge station, which may or may not be adjustable. When the default setting is to high and it cannot be adjusted to a low-enough value (less or equal to 80% of braker capacity) you have a serious risk issue (unless your circuit comfortably supports the full 32 amps sustained, of course). When it is adjustable to a low enough value, it still may not be adjustable to exactly 80% of the braker capacity, resulting in a lower charge performance. For example, when you aim to stay below 80% of 24 amps, with many charge stations you probably end up with 16 amps instead of 19.2 amps, resulting in a reduction of charge speed of close to 20%.

Also, do we know the Bolt will indeed take the maximum of what it is allowed to take by he charge station (assuming sufficiently low battery state of charge)? Or does it maybe maintain a safety margin by itself? I have a separate topic running on this matter (http://www.chevybolt.org/forum/82-charging-batteries/7122-l2-charging-how-much-power-drawn-various-settings.html). Any input there would be appreciated.


For my current car (not a Bolt), the last 20% takes about 1 hour out of a total of 3.5 hours. So, yes it goes a lot slower, but I don't think it will really take longer. Semantics, I guess ;)
correct!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Keep in mind: just trying to be helpful 0:)

Nice informative post. One concern though: I am a bit worried people (EV newbies) might be led to believe the Bolt will automatically adjust it's charging speed to 80% of the braker capacity. But this is obviously not the case. It all depends on the setting of the (portable) charge station, which may or may not be adjustable. When the default setting is to high and it cannot be adjusted to a low-enough value (less or equal to 80% of braker capacity) you have a serious risk issue (unless your circuit comfortably supports the full 32 amps sustained, of course). When it is adjustable to a low enough value, it still may not be adjustable to exactly 80% of the braker capacity, resulting in a lower charge performance. For example, when you aim to stay below 80% of 24 amps, with many charge stations you probably end up with 16 amps instead of 19.2 amps, resulting in a reduction of charge speed of close to 20%.

Also, do we know the Bolt will indeed take the maximum of what it is allowed to take by he charge station (assuming sufficiently low battery state of charge)? Or does it maybe maintain a safety margin by itself? I have a separate topic running on this matter (http://www.chevybolt.org/forum/82-charging-batteries/7122-l2-charging-how-much-power-drawn-various-settings.html). Any input there would be appreciated.


For my current car (not a Bolt), the last 20% takes about 1 hour out of a total of 3.5 hours. So, yes it goes a lot slower, but I don't think it will really take longer. Semantics, I guess ;)
so far I've always seen the bolt take the maximum charge rate reported by the external charger - modulo 2 or 4% variation due to current/weather/temperature conditions. At this point in time I have not seen the Bolt charging software charge at a significantly lower rate than the external charger can handle (other than the factory charger which offers a 8 or 12 amp setting via in car software).

At this point in time I think it's safe to assume the Bolt will just happily charge at what ever rate the external charger reports and makes no attempt to modify the charge rate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
it is also correct that even if external chargers are configurable they typically at _NOT_ configurable at a single AMP granularity. Often times you have to select from a set of pre-determined values that may _NOT_ optimize your breaker/wiring.

If you have a 32 AMP circuit you're going to reused (I've seen a 32 amp breakers) most external chargers will not let you select the exact 80% value of 32 amps - rather you'd have to set it to 24 AMPs or even 16 AMPS if there isn't a 24 amp setting. The rule is you can set the external charger to be lower than 80% of your breaker, but you should _NOT_ set it to be higher than 80% of the circuit's breaker.

This is part of the reasons my recommendation to new EV customers considering a home charger installation is to install the biggest/baddest EV charger they can muster. The incremental cost of larger AMP charger installed (correctly) is normally not that much more than a smaller amp charger. And even if your current EV can't take advantage of the higher AMP's your future EV will probably be able to benefit from a larger charger and that way you only purchase the charger once.

The two best choices in my option for price/performance are (in my opinion):

1. ClipperCreek HCS-60 for $899 - 48 AMP charger - J-1772 - requires a 60 AMP circuit breaker and appropriate wiring
https://store.clippercreek.com/residential/hcs-60-48-amp-ev-charging-station?sort=p.price&order=DESC

2. Modified Tesla Wall Connector (modified to have a J-1772 connector) for $999.00 - configurable from 12 to 80 AMP charging rate - again make sure the actual breaker/wire matches your desired setting
2.1 Tesla Wall Connectors can be configured in a Master/Slave configuration (1 master, up to 3 slaves) - in this configuration the chargers are wired to share a single circuit breaker and co-operate to charge up to 4 EV's all at once and not overload the shared circuit/breaker. This is ideal future-proofing for your eventual dual EV household - install one charger now, and when you get your 2nd EV simply add another Tesla Wall connector, no new circuit, no new breaker, and voila you have a shared dual EV charging solution for minimal cost to add the 2nd charger and you can charge 2 EV's over night on a single circuit.

the total cost of installing a home charger includes wire (expensive depending on length of run), new breakers, electrician labor, parts, potential main panel upgrade, permits - and the total cost is about the same for a 16 AMP charger as it is for an 80 AMP charger - so my advice is do it once, and get the biggest your house can handle - you'll thank me later on your 2nd/3rd/4th EV.

But to be clear - the Bolt can ONLY take advantage of a 32 AMP charge rate - so a bigger home charger is simply for your future plans, not your current Bolt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
and for those that are interested the Tesla Wall Connector charger supports the following settings for charge-rate/breaker listed below in AMPS (page 21 of the Tesla Wall connector installation manual)

12/15
16/20
20/25
24/30
28/35
32/40
36/45
40/50
48/60
56/70
64/80
72/90
80/100

Clipper Creek also makes a 100 amp charger (70 AMP charge rate) but it's very very pricey and to worth it IMHO - $2195 - vs. the Tesla charger that can do 80 AMPs for $999 (modified for a J-1772 adapter).

https://store.clippercreek.com/level2/level2-40-to-80/cs-100-70-amp-80-amp-ev-charging-station.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
350 Posts
A small correction:
In addition, they all have different blade configurations, so you can't accidentally plug-in an appliance that is designed to draw 50A into a receptacle that is only rated for 30A.
The EVSEs I have seen have the 240v Ground pin removed, so they can plug into any 14-xx outlet type from 30a to 60a.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
it is also correct that even if external chargers ...
Just a comment.

Although "charger" and EVSE (or charging station) are often used interchangeably, it is probably best (in a technical discussion) to point out that the "charger" is built into the car. EVSE units are essentially a "smart extension cord" that supply AC to the car (and provide a host of safety features).

When fast charging with DC current (add on option for the Bolt), the charger is indeed part of the service equipment, but AC charging is handled by the car.

The difference is arguably irrelevant in superficial discussions, but I feel that technical discussions should make the distinction.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
A small correction:

The EVSEs I have seen have the 240v Ground pin removed, so they can plug into any 14-xx outlet type from 30a to 60a.
Plugging in a high-voltage/high-amperage device without proper grounding is a lethal mistake just waiting to happen. Are you sure that it's not the neutral that has been removed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
A small correction:

The EVSEs I have seen have the 240v Ground pin removed, so they can plug into any 14-xx outlet type from 30a to 60a.
Even with that as a fail safe I think there might be some smart technology going on with the battery system which could stop it from charging if an incorrect charger is detected. There's already some special tech in the new USB ports that can direct power where needed depending what a specific device requires (smartphones, tablets, etc.). But that's all speculation, still, not entirely out of the norm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
979 Posts
It might be better to submit this in a “nitpick” thread. However, given that many expert eyes are focused on this thread I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to ask:

Please explain the following “disconnects” in the Bolt’s charger specifications, further confused by differences EVSE specs between Chevrolet (marketer) and AeroVironment (supplier) of the “official” Chevrolet accessory EVSE:

  • Per Chevrolet.com Bolt EV “Specs” website page: the onboard charger is described as: “7.2 kW high-voltage on-board charger”
    BTW: 240V*30A=7.2kW
  • On pages 23 and 231 of Bolt EV Owner’s Manual, reference is made to the amount of time (about 9.5 hours) required to charge the Bolt using EVSE set to 240 volts and 32 Amps
  • The “official” EVSE for the Chevrolet Bolt is an AeroVironment (AV) supplied unit advertised by Chevrolet as a 240 volt 32 Amp unit (on Bolt Accessories webpage, it appears as “Image not found”)
  • The AV unit previously and currently sold on AV’s website and other websites, the “EVSE-RS” unit, advertised as a 240 volt 30 Amp unit. There is no 32 Amp unit shown on AV’s website. Implication is that AV has designed and approved a specific 32A unit only for Chevrolet ?
    BTW: AV’s EVSEs described as “chargers” some with respective logos for Nissan, Ford, Fiat, Mitsubishi, Kia, are all described as 240 volt 30 Amp

    The above data discrepancies were discussed in below thread, without coming to a consensus:
    http://www.chevybolt.org/forum/82-charging-batteries/5353-aerovironment-official-charger-chevy-bolt.html



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I did not know the Clipper Creek you could not set current level.

I have the regular Juicebox40 and can set it in the app or webpage. They also were the only place I could find all the adapters for the different NEMA plug types.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I did not know the Clipper Creek you could not set current level.

I have the regular Juicebox40 and can set it in the app or webpage. They also were the only place I could find all the adapters for the different NEMA plug types.
Clippercreek chargers are set at the factory based on what product you purchase - there is no adjustments - you must install them with correct wire and breaker to match the product you purchased.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top