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I just stepped through as many menus as I could find without encountering a SoC% screen. How do I get to it?
The app or my.chevrolet.com is the best way. The "gas" gauge is the only way in the car.
edit: just took a screen shot of my car from the my.chevrolet.com
30491
 

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OK, so I did a 2-hour, L1, 16A test charge this morning. First let me say that although the OpenEVSE settings are in whole numbers, the LED display always shows less than whole numbers. For example, when I select 6A, the display shows 5.5A. And for this test when I selected 16A, the display showed 15.1A. The manufacturer says, "The measurements are not 'revenue grade'", whatever that means, and that 120V is assumed in its kwh calculations.

I used 2 different digital multimeters to measure the house voltage at 122V. So by calculation I consumed 3.6844 kwh. The display said it consumed 3.595 kwh. Before the charge, the SoC was 57%. After the charge, the SoC was 68%, an 11% gain. 11% of the 60kwh battery is 6.6 kwh, almost twice what I thought I added. So I must have made a math mistake, or the charger is really running at L2 without my permission, or there is a genie in my car, or....
 

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I don't. Are they expensive?
There are ultracheap ones that are <$20, I'm not sure if they're from the category of "reuses a MAC address and acts funny if another one is in range".

I have a very highend unit (OBDKey) and a bunch of USB-CAN adapters, but there may be recommendations for cheap-but-still-good obd adapters in Chevrolet Bolt OBD2 PIDs or on the Torque Pro website.

Torque Pro + an OBD adapter is a wonderful thing to have for the Bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
Please explain why it's wonderful.
For a start, how many amps and volts the car is receiving when plugged in to an L1/L2/DC charger. Also how much power the heat/AC is pulling, whether all your cells are balanced voltage-wise, etc.
 

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OK, so I did a 2-hour, L1, 16A test charge this morning. First let me say that although the OpenEVSE settings are in whole numbers, the LED display always shows less than whole numbers. For example, when I select 6A, the display shows 5.5A. And for this test when I selected 16A, the display showed 15.1A. The manufacturer says, "The measurements are not 'revenue grade'", whatever that means, and that 120V is assumed in its kwh calculations.

I used 2 different digital multimeters to measure the house voltage at 122V. So by calculation I consumed 3.6844 kwh. The display said it consumed 3.595 kwh. Before the charge, the SoC was 57%. After the charge, the SoC was 68%, an 11% gain. 11% of the 60kwh battery is 6.6 kwh, almost twice what I thought I added. So I must have made a math mistake, or the charger is really running at L2 without my permission, or there is a genie in my car, or....
Can you explain the "without my permission" piece of this? Is the Open EVSE supplied with 122V, 244V, or both (both meaning both legs and the common)?
 

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Can you explain the "without my permission" piece of this? Is the Open EVSE supplied with 122V, 244V, or both (both meaning both legs and the common)?
I mean that maybe the OpenEVSE set itself to L2 without my input, and without telling me. It's supplied with both, plugged into a NEMA 14-50R.
 

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I mean that maybe the OpenEVSE set itself to L2 without my input, and without telling me. It's supplied with both, plugged into a NEMA 14-50R.
It an EVSE is plugged into a 14-50R it's going to deliver 240V down the line. Essentially an EVSE is nothing more than a smart extension cord. So if you plug that cord into 240V, then you'll get 240V down the line.

Here is a clearer explanation of what's going on from :
OpenEVSE - Open Source Charging Station - Page 138 - My Nissan Leaf Forum

You can not tell a 240VAC connected unit that it is a L1 unit. It does not work that way. OpenEVSE has settable current via the pilot. You could alter the current and have the same effect as an L1 connected unit.

Normally it is set to auto and it sets itself. In the first menu setting you can force it to use the L1 or L2 table. This only alters the pilot. Physical connections determine the connection. If it is connected to 240V and you use the L1 table then bamm, it is now a 12A unit but still at 240V.
Hope this clarified the issue.

ga2500ev
 

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That's really interesting and would sort of explain why I got the test results that I did. But I don't understand why the OpenEVSE would even offer L1 in its menu. The only way it's available is as a 240V connected device.

Another thing that makes no sense is that I use the L1 setting on the OpenEVSE to match my charging rate to my solar array output. I do the matching by reading my string inverters and doing a simple calculation on where to set the current. If the OpenEVSE were operating at L2 when I think it's operating at L1, then my POCO meter would be running forwards instead of staying still. But I've never seen that happen.
 

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That's really interesting and would sort of explain why I got the test results that I did. But I don't understand why the OpenEVSE would even offer L1 in its menu. The only way it's available is as a 240V connected device.

Another thing that makes no sense is that I use the L1 setting on the OpenEVSE to match my charging rate to my solar array output. I do the matching by reading my string inverters and doing a simple calculation on where to set the current. If the OpenEVSE were operating at L2 when I think it's operating at L1, then my POCO meter would be running forwards instead of staying still. But I've never seen that happen.
The setting is a misnomer because it's not really based on voltage. It's really a 12A/Max amps/Auto switch. The voltage delivered to the EV is exactly the same voltage the OpenEVSE is plugged into.

What voltage is coming out of your inverters? That's the voltage going into the car. All the current setting does is adjust the PWM duty cycle on the Control Pilot signal to limit the amount of current the car can draw from the EVSE.

ga2500ev
 

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That's really interesting and would sort of explain why I got the test results that I did. But I don't understand why the OpenEVSE would even offer L1 in its menu. The only way it's available is as a 240V connected device.

Another thing that makes no sense is that I use the L1 setting on the OpenEVSE to match my charging rate to my solar array output. I do the matching by reading my string inverters and doing a simple calculation on where to set the current. If the OpenEVSE were operating at L2 when I think it's operating at L1, then my POCO meter would be running forwards instead of staying still. But I've never seen that happen.
Does your utility allow you to see hour by hour usage? You can then verify the kWh draw, as I had described initially.
 

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My inverters are hooked to double pole breakers in the main service panel, so I assume they are 240V.

No, I asked them that several months ago and they don't allow it.
Well, the the absence of hourly usage info, my 10 hour experiment suggestion should work... 20 kWh vs 33 kWh usage should jump out at you on a daily chart - I really hope you can at least get a day by day usage chart. At this point, we can pretty safely assume you're drawing 240v 16A.
 

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I'm not quite convinced, for the reasons I gave. I've asked the OpenEVSE manufacturer to explain, and will post what they say.
There's really no need for that. It's clearly defined in their schematics. This image is from the P50D build guide:

In the bottom right corner the inputs for L1,L2,G clearly state that 240V-N (white) not connected. Since there isn't a neutral line available, it is impossible for the unit to deliver 120V when plugged into a 240V socket no matter what setting you use.

See post #91 for an explanation of what L1 does. It doesn't control the voltage. It sets the max current limit.

Now it is possible to set up an OpenEVSE to charge at 16, or even 24 amps at 120V using a TT-30. But to do it, it has to be plugged into a 120V socket. If plugged into 240V, it'll always deliver 240V to the car.

ga2500ev
 

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There's really no need for that. It's clearly defined in their schematics.
I've given 2 good reasons why there is a need. One is that, if the OpenEVSE is only available as a 240V-connected device, it makes no sense for it to have a service level menu. It should simply be advertised as an L2 EVSE. The other is that if it has always been delivering 240V to the car when I was expecting and assuming 120V, I would have been seeing my POCO meter spinning forwards rather than being motionless due to being balanced by my solar array output.
 

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I've given 2 good reasons why there is a need. One is that, if the OpenEVSE is only available as a 240V-connected device, it makes no sense for it to have a service level menu. It should simply be advertised as an L2 EVSE. The other is that if it has always been delivering 240V to the car when I was expecting and assuming 120V, I would have been seeing my POCO meter spinning forwards rather than being motionless due to being balanced by my solar array output.
Plug it in to a 120V socket and it will deliver 120V...

I don't see the problem.

Keith
 
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