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I couldn't find a table that tells you what you get out of each charger type, so I ended up putting together my own table. These numbers don't take into account that the car charges slower when it's closer to full, but it's a reasonable ballpark. I'll update it if folks find any errors.

DCFC (50kW): 90mi/30m or 160mi/h
DCFC (25kW): 45mi/30m or 90mi/h
DCFC (12.5kW): 22.5mi/30m 45mi/h
[email protected] (7.04kW): 25mi/h or 8h31m
[email protected] (5.06kW): 18mi/h or 12h
[email protected] (3.52kW): 12.5mi/h or 17h
[email protected] (2.88kW): 11.42mi/h or 20h50m
[email protected] (1.44kW): 5.7mi/h or 41h40m
[email protected] (0.960kW): 3.8mi/h or 62h30m
 

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I couldn't find a table that tells you what you get out of each charger type, so I ended up putting together my own table. These numbers don't take into account that the car charges slower when it's closer to full, but it's a reasonable ballpark. I'll update it if folks find any errors.

DCFC (50kW): 90mi/30m or 160mi/h
DCFC (25kW): 45mi/30m or 90mi/h
DCFC (12.5kW): 22.5mi/30m 45mi/h
[email protected] (7.04kW): 25mi/h or 8h31m
[email protected] (5.06kW): 18mi/h or 12h
[email protected] (3.52kW): 12.5mi/h or 17h
[email protected] (2.88kW): 11.42mi/h or 20h50m
[email protected] (1.44kW): 5.7mi/h or 41h40m
[email protected] (0.960kW): 3.8mi/h or 62h30m
Since, in most areas “high” voltage is 240 volts for residential and 206 volts for commercial, should your table extrapolate to those voltages? And since some commercial Level 2 EVSE are 30 amp, should there be a line for this? Does temperature affect charging rates much? Finally, with DCFC amperage dropping with increasing battery SoC, whereby the first 30 min. gets you MUCH more than the 3rd or 4th 30 min., would a graph serve better than a table?
 

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Good catch, SurgeonFWW. I have a portable 32 AMP EVSE that shows the actual charging rate, and it's typically 7.78 kW, which corresponds to the voltage is just above 240V. Where we live, it's indeed 120-something between live and neutral. I don't know how long exactly the actual full charging lasts, because I have never been in the 0 kWh situation.
 

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I suspect the onboard charger has two limits...32 amps, and 7.68 kW, just like my Satiator bicycle charger has an amp, and a watt limit. I say this because the voltage in our garage is often as high as 250 volts. As seen on my Juicebox 40, at those times the current is cut back to limit the output to 7.68 kW ( My recollection. I will have to check again, and write it down).
 

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I suspect the onboard charger has two limits...32 amps, and 7.68 kW, just like my Satiator bicycle charger has an amp, and a watt limit. I say this because the voltage in our garage is often as high as 250 volts. As seen on my Juicebox 40, at those times the current is cut back to limit the output to 7.68 kW ( My recollection. I will have to check again, and write it down).
That's what I see, I regularly get 248V-250V, but only see 7.68 kW charging. I've rate limited the JB to 8A however (the minimum the Bolt will charge at) which is 2kW charge, because the bulk of my charging is done at work.
 

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Keep your table simple for beginners who are interesred in purchasing a bolt but can't search through the forum...

Ideally, it would be great if the administrator would have a side tab on the ooening pzge with this kind of valuable information...you know basic stuff.

Things like that table, chargers, range, heating and air and highway and city driving.

It would be extremely valuable rather than searching the whole forum...
 

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The car will tell you how long until full when you plug in, I just use that as being most accurate and readily available (it also accounts for Hilltop reserve if you have that enabled). Nice chart though, gives us an idea.
 

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PHP:
You could call it "Bolt for beginners" or something like that.
I think that, with common agreement, the “New Member Introductions” section could be not just for introductions, but for topics critical to the new owner/leaser, such as basic charger/charging info. We all can browse the cosmetic (bow tie, dead foot pedal mat, etc.) and complex diy pages, and share the long-trip stories and hypermiling techniques. But junior members won’t have to search 1000 comments to find what a Level 2 EVSE is (and isn’t).
 

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typically you need to add at least 10% to charging time estimates due to loss during the charging process - charging is not 100% efficient

here is my post from Feb. 2017 on the topic

http://www.chevybolt.org/forum/82-charging-batteries/7186-charger-math-skip-post-if-you-know-already.html#post76418
I don't think the 10% loss affects the charging time. If the Bolt says it is charging at 7 kWh, that should be how much it is accepting. The 10% needs to be accounted for when paying your electric bill, but it won't add 10% to your charging time.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I could add some lines for those things. I actually do have a rough idea of the breakdowns for DC fast charging, but I’m not convinced that my the points are quite correct.

Edit: Quote fail, but this was responding to the post for 30A, 206V commercial service, and DCFC.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The car will tell you how long until full when you plug in, I just use that as being most accurate and readily available (it also accounts for Hilltop reserve if you have that enabled). Nice chart though, gives us an idea.
Totally true. I mostly use this to help plan more regional trips out of the city.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I don't think the 10% loss affects the charging time. If the Bolt says it is charging at 7 kWh, that should be how much it is accepting. The 10% needs to be accounted for when paying your electric bill, but it won't add 10% to your charging time.
While it does take longer than these numbers, I’m more going for a ballpark versus precision.
 

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I disagree on the 10% fudge factor - raw number (amps * volts) show 60 kWh should take less than 9 hours - chevy notes it take 9+ hours to fully charge a bolt - the loss is "post" car charger - the EVSE delivers the full Volts/AMPs- and then you lose 10%'ish in the AC to DC conversion - hence the increase in charging time.

so I believe once you do the math

240 volts * 32 amps = 7,680 watts

60,000 / 7,680 = 7.8 hours

if you add the 15% fudge factor you arrive at 8.97 hours = which matches the 9 hour figure Chevy publishes for a full charge…

you are pumping 7,680 watts into the car - but the car is only pumping about 6,528 watts into the battery due to charger loss and AC/DC conversion.

but without a chevy engineer on the forums it's all just speculation on my part - but the the actual charging times match my observed behavior for kWh I need to charge, and time it took + fudge factor.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I disagree on the figures being included - raw number (amps * volts) show 60 kWh should take less than 9 hours - chevy notes it take 9+ hours to fully charge a bolt - the loss is "post" car charger - the EVSE delivers the full Volts/AMPs- and then you lose 10%'ish in the AC to DC conversion - hence the increase in charging time.
Sure, these are ballpark numbers based on an ideal battery. There's the efficiency of the AC to DC conversion and the slower rate of charge necessary to get it to 100% towards the end. If you can produce a more accurate table, I'd certainly appreciate it :)
 

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I couldn't find a table that tells you what you get out of each charger type, so I ended up putting together my own table. These numbers don't take into account that the car charges slower when it's closer to full, but it's a reasonable ballpark. I'll update it if folks find any errors.

DCFC (50kW): 90mi/30m or 160mi/h
DCFC (25kW): 45mi/30m or 90mi/h
DCFC (12.5kW): 22.5mi/30m 45mi/h
[email protected] (7.04kW): 25mi/h or 8h31m
[email protected] (5.06kW): 18mi/h or 12h
[email protected] (3.52kW): 12.5mi/h or 17h
[email protected] (2.88kW): 11.42mi/h or 20h50m
[email protected] (1.44kW): 5.7mi/h or 41h40m
[email protected] (0.960kW): 3.8mi/h or 62h30m
For the 220V entries, it should be changed to list 240V. The 25 miles per hour figure that GM claims uses 32A @ 240V to get the max rate of 7.68 kW. If you use a charger that uses a supply voltage of 220V, or 208V, you’ll get longer charge times/less rate per hour.

The 120V figures are actually 4 miles at 12A, and 3 miles at 8A.
 

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Also the car's charger tapers off amps near the end of the charge. I noticed on mine after a few minutes of shutting off, the battery relaxes a little and takes a little more charge (usually another .5-1kwh).
That's interesting. I assume that's a full charge (as opposed to Hilltop Reserve mode)?

I'm thinking that in Hilltop Reserve mode the charge rate probably remains the same throughout the charge cycle.
 

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That's interesting. I assume that's a full charge (as opposed to Hilltop Reserve mode)?

I'm thinking that in Hilltop Reserve mode the charge rate probably remains the same throughout the charge cycle.
correct it only tapers for L2 charging once you're above like 96-97% - only then is the battery so close to full that even an L2 charger can no longer pump full current…

my Tesla shows me Volts/AMP's during charging - and it's kinda ROFL when I fully charge it - when it's at 98% it's like 240/Volts @ 4 amps…with 20 minutes remaining to charge - and 20 min. later it's 240 volts @ 2 amps - with 15 minutes remaining to charge…

if you look at the actual range you're adding once you're at like 98% it normally minuscule…
 
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