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Discussion Starter #1
While preparing for what I hope to be a long road trip in my 2019 Bolt this Fall I've noted that EV charger power levels vary all the way from 25kW (rare), 62.5kW (quite rare, found some in TX), right up to 350kW.

Is there a chart or table which shows how these various chargers impact charging speed of the Bolt. I understand that there are a number of variables (temperature, ambient and battery, being the main one) which will impact such speeds.

Thanks,

Rich
 

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sure,
This is one of the better collections for the pre 2020MY Bolt EV
 

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implied but possibly not explicitly stated is that the same rated kW chargers have different current output. Current delivered is what matters. Most (all?) 62.5kW or higher will charge the Bolt EV at the full rated current the BMS allows for the given conditions.
 

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While preparing for what I hope to be a long road trip in my 2019 Bolt this Fall I've noted that EV charger power levels vary all the way from 25kW (rare), 62.5kW (quite rare, found some in TX), right up to 350kW.

Is there a chart or table which shows how these various chargers impact charging speed of the Bolt. I understand that there are a number of variables (temperature, ambient and battery, being the main one) which will impact such speeds.

Thanks,

Rich
My rule of thumb for Bolt EVs (2017-2019) is about 1% added per 1 minute of charging on 100 A DCFC. It's not exact, but it's close (as referenced by the chart linked to above). For 125 A and 150 A chargers, it is about 20% and 33% reduction respectively. Again, referencing the chart, about 1% added every 50 seconds on a 125 A charger and 1% added every 40 seconds on a 150 A charger.

There are a lot of other variables that go into it, including when the step downs occur and whether battery conditioning or cabin heating/cooling are needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
implied but possibly not explicitly stated is that the same rated kW chargers have different current output. Current delivered is what matters. Most (all?) 62.5kW or higher will charge the Bolt EV at the full rated current the BMS allows for the given conditions.
Wonderbolt, this means that there is no speed advantage in using say a 150kW unit over anything over a 62.5kW fast charger? The costs are listed as substantially higher on the Electrify America sites as you go up in power (350kW being the priciest).

Rich
 

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Discussion Starter #7
An example of the various prices from a FL EA site (and these prices do vary with where the fast charger is located):
POWER
CHARGING

1 - 350 kW

$0.89 / min.

1 - 125 kW
$0.58 / min.

1 - 75 kW
$0.21 / min.

So, there is no advantage to using a 350kW unit (let's go big or go home!) over the 75kW unit?
Rich
 

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These are just the prices based on what the vehicle asks for, there are only 150kW and 350kW units (and a single 50 kW CHAdeMO head). Regardless of whether you use the 150 or 350 kW units the Bolt will only ask for 55 kW and you will pay the lowest tier pricing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks TFRDrive, this is new info for me! Is there a speed advantage to using the more powerful chargers thou?

Rich
 

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Not with Electrify America. All of their chargers (assuming working correctly, of course) will charge the Bolt the same. It's the Bolt that can't accept more than 55 kW, they will all be well below their max output.
 

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Thanks TFRDrive, this is new info for me! Is there a speed advantage to using the more powerful chargers thou?

Rich
Currently, only one EV takes advantage of the 350 kW chargers over the 150 kW chargers. That's the Porsche Taycan, which currently has a faster peak charging rate than any other EV at 270 kW. However, even for other fast charging vehicles such as the Audi e-tron (~150 kW), it will see the same speeds whether it's using the 150 kW or 350 kW charger. Basically, unless you're driving a Porsche Taycan, there's no difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"Basically, unless you're driving a Porsche Taycan, there's no difference."

So, if I rename my Bolt a Porsche Taycan I'm good to go! :devilish:

Rich
 

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While preparing for what I hope to be a long road trip in my 2019 Bolt this Fall I've noted that EV charger power levels vary all the way from 25kW (rare), 62.5kW (quite rare, found some in TX), right up to 350kW.

Is there a chart or table which shows how these various chargers impact charging speed of the Bolt. I understand that there are a number of variables (temperature, ambient and battery, being the main one) which will impact such speeds.

Thanks,

Rich
Quite a few 62.5 kW stations in Colorado - well, as a percentage of the total.
 

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Not with Electrify America. All of their chargers (assuming working correctly, of course) will charge the Bolt the same. It's the Bolt that can't accept more than 55 kW, they will all be well below their max output.
If I'm not mistaken, the EA charger that includes the ChaDeMo cable is only 50 kW. The others are 150 or 350 kW.
 

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If I'm not mistaken, the EA charger that includes the ChaDeMo cable is only 50 kW. The others are 150 or 350 kW.
I hear rumor that there are some "Urban" EA locations that have 50kW units, but I haven't seen any on the trips I have plotted out. At all of the highway adjacent EA locations I've seen the CHAdeMO is 50kW but the CCS is 150kW.
 

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I hear rumor that there are some "Urban" EA locations that have 50kW units, but I haven't seen any on the trips I have plotted out. At all of the highway adjacent EA locations I've seen the CHAdeMO is 50kW but the CCS is 150kW.
There are some Electrify America "Urban" sites that only offer 50 kW charging across the board, but they primarily (if not all) in California. They were part of the initial build out, but Electrify America quickly changed their plains. After the first year or so, all new Electrify America sites were 150 kW or faster. Here are a couple of their 50 kW sites that I've visited:


 

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There are some Electrify America "Urban" sites that only offer 50 kW charging across the board, but they primarily (if not all) in California. They were part of the initial build out, but Electrify America quickly changed their plains.
I noticed that their initial round was to get EVgo to add additional stations where there already existed infrastructure. It was weird because you'd pay the roaming rate if you used one unit, but EVgo rates if you used the other one, with the main difference being a sticker on the front.
 

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I noticed that their initial round was to get EVgo to add additional stations where there already existed infrastructure. It was weird because you'd pay the roaming rate if you used one unit, but EVgo rates if you used the other one, with the main difference being a sticker on the front.
Yes, I think that was mostly an East Coast thing. I don't think EVgo really needed much support out here in California.

However, that being said, I think expanding EVgo's current sites would be a huge benefit, and some of Electrify America's money should probably go toward that. Nissan already funded 200 new 100 kW chargers for EVgo, but I'm not sure if any have actually gone in. I also don't know if the were intended to be standalone sites (i.e., 50 to 100 sites with between two and four 100 kW chargers) or whether they would be added to and supplementing existing sites. EVgo seems to favor the new sites, though, because they can currently celebrate the fact that they have the most DC fast charging sites of any provider in the United States (even more than the Tesla Supercharger Network).

But having the most sites comes at a cost. Most of EVgo's sites are one or two chargers, and a number of the two charger sites are actually one dual-standard (CCS and CHAdeMO) and one CHAdeMO-only. If EVgo started using their funding from Nissan (and possibly support from Electrify America) to expand some of their better-located, more compelling sites, it would be huge. Just the addition of two 100 kW to 150 kW chargers and a grid-tied Tesla Powerpack at some of EVgo's more compelling locations would result in a huge upgrade for EV owners.
 
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