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Just to put things in perspective, yes electric cars use electricity (!) but these are not the only things that use electricity in our households...
I have an Emporia Energy whole house power monitor at home (in Quebec, Canada where winters are cold!).

Here is an abbreviated rundown for year 2021 (to get a full 12 months of 4 seasons) by kWh/% of total:
Total: 26373kWh/100%
Heatpump: 3660kWh/14%
Inground pool pump: 3462kWh/13%
Computers & servers: 3279kWh/12%
Furnace: 2995kWh/11%
EVSE: 2708kWh/10%
Water heater: 2253kWh/9%
Garage baseboard heater: 736kWh/3%
Fridges & freezer: 696kWh/3%
Clothes dryer: 501kWh/2%
Oven: 191kWh/1%
...
Rest of the house: 3000kWh/11%

So, the 16000km (10000mi) I drive in my car yearly is only the fifth biggest electricity expense (2/3 of the pool pump used 6 months). So, saying that putting electricity in our cars is such a bad thing is a little hypocritical. What about all the rest?? If I didn't have an EV, I'd still be using 90% of what I use now.
Oh, Ss far as I know the numbers are still in favor of the EV even if the electricity comes from coal or oil.
I didn’t mean to imply electric cars are inferior in any way to gas/oil motors. In fact I can see no downside with respect to our current fuel. It’s clear that we need to move into nuclear energy as rapidly as possible. Even if nuclear energy is only a stop gap to the next energy innovation we need it now and in a large scale way.

Eliminate anything that burns as a fuel source- renewable or not.
 

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2022 Bolt 2LT ice blue metallic; 2011 Chevy Volt premier diamond white;
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Don't forget natural gas. It burns VERY, VERY cleanly. It's not perfect, but it's a heck of a bridge fuel for generating electricity. But, you're right about nuclear. All this talk about solar when the sun, itself, is one giant reactor.
Don't forget about solar as well, over 90% of our electric comes off our roof and the remainder is either solar from the utility or nuclear from Palo Verde which is the largest Nuclear plant in the USA. There are some gas speakers here as well but I suspect our night time usage comes from base load nuclear.
 

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Don't forget about solar as well, over 90% of our electric comes off our roof and the remainder is either solar from the utility or nuclear from Palo Verde which is the largest Nuclear plant in the USA. There are some gas speakers here as well but I suspect our night time usage comes from base load nuclear.
With all due respect (don't you love that little hedge?), roof solar isn't an option for the vast majority of people (apartment dwellers, low to middle income homeowners, everyone in Seattle) and it doesn't work very well at night and under cloudy skies. And the cost to store solar- and wind-generated electricity would bankrupt our already bankrupt country. It's not as cheap and easy as storing megabytes and gigabytes and terabytes, etc. However, I defer to electrical engineers. I'm just a retired CPA who's not so sure that getting old and leaving my mortal coil isn't a better option than sticking around for the alternative. Have a happy day!
 

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What price is put on 105 degree F heat in places it hasn’t ever happened, as the UK just experienced? They don’t need air conditioning so no one has it. How much is a heat-related death worth? How many died?
To put a finer point on it, the local weather woman recently said that Denver has had 24 100+ degree days in its entire recorded history (since 1859). 9 of those were last year. 4 were this year so far. Since then, we've had 2 more.
 

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All that said, I've always argued that paying for necessary infrastructure with gasoline taxes is dumb, because the proper way to pay for necessary things is through regular tax revenue. 100% of people rely on road infrastructure to live they way they do, so why not fund it adequately through regular taxation like everything else we consider to be necessary?
Right on, brother!
 

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In the US, the top 1% of earners pay 40% of taxes.
Actually, the top 1% pay 38.8% of the INCOME taxes, not the total taxes. That does not include property taxes, sales taxes, registration taxes, gas taxes, social security and Medicare taxes, etc. The bottom 99% pay a much higher % of their income on those taxes so that the total tax burden of the top 1% is much lower than the ~40% that is often quoted. The billionaire pays the same gas tax as the minimum wage earner. The billionaire pays the same social security tax as the guy making $138,000. The billionaire might have to pay higher property taxes on his multiple mansions, but less proportionally to his disposable income.
 

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"Raw" or "Adjusted" temperatures? Either way, the local weather woman doesn't know what the heck she's talking about.
Denver Summer Heat
I don't know what you mean by "adjusted" temperatures. Heat index?

OK. So it's really 83 days since temperatures were recorded. But the data you cite only goes to mid-July 2022. We had some more 100+ days since then. It looks like she might have confused 2012 with 2021. Dyslexia is a *****. But the point is that 52 of the 83 have been in the 21st century. There is some skewing of the data because the place where the temperature is measured has changed over the years. It was originally downtown. After Stapleton Airport was built in 1929, the temperature was taken there. After DIA was built in 1995, the temperature was taken there. Generally, downtown was hotter than Stapleton which is hotter than DIA. So, the skewing probably understates the problem.
 

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Oh, Ss far as I know the numbers are still in favor of the EV even if the electricity comes from coal or oil.
I didn’t mean to imply electric cars are inferior in any way to gas/oil motors. In fact I can see no downside with respect to our current fuel. It’s clear that we need to move into nuclear energy as rapidly as possible. Even if nuclear energy is only a stop gap to the next energy innovation we need it now and in a large scale way.

Eliminate anything that burns as a fuel source- renewable or not.
Unfortunately for the nuclear option, it takes too long to finance, build and license a nuclear power plant, so any investment in nuclear will come too late. As you say, we need cleaner energy now, not 20-30 years from now. Also, nuclear is the most expensive electricity you can buy. That being said, and despite the obvious problems of nuclear waste disposal, I do think we need to keep the existing plants running a bit longer as a bridge to cleaner solutions.
 
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