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Back in January, Chevrolet released the Bolt’s state-by-state distribution plan and as promised, their first long-range electric vehicle is now available at dealerships nationwide in the U.S.

As the first to market, beating the Tesla Model 3 and next generation Nissan Leaf, the Bolt EV amassed a large following and according to Autoguide, Chevy has sold 11,670 Bolt EVs this year. If you tack on the sales made since last December, that’s an impressive 12,249 vehicles.

Of course an affordable starting price of $37,495 (including destination) plus a maximum of $7,500 in federal tax incentives helps as well. But most appealing may be the much touted 238 miles of range with some forum members surpassing that in real world numbers.

The long list of standard features in the LT trim including the 10.2-inch color touchscreen, Regen on Demand, and eight-year/100,000-mile limited warranty is just icing on the cake.

If you add on the Canadian Bolt sales of 866 vehicles, Chevy may hit Karl Brauer’s prediction of 30,000 to 80,000 Bolt EVs sold before the end of the year.
 

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This is why I like competition, imagine if Tesla and Nissan wasn't around what would happen... oh yeah it would be like when the Chevy Volt first came out. Those were some slow times for the EV market.
 

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Unlike the West Coast, charging infrastructure does not exist IN EVERY STATE. Only hardcore tree huggers are willing to take the risk. Chicken/egg problem revisited.
 

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Unlike the West Coast, charging infrastructure does not exist IN EVERY STATE. Only hardcore tree huggers are willing to take the risk. Chicken/egg problem revisited.
Although in Richmond, VA there is no dearth of DCFC! Try living in KY, WV, Mississippi or Louisiana!
 

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I would happily own an EV in any state, regardless of DCFC. I plan to never use one, at least until they get way better. I've got better things to do than hang around for an hour to charge.
I understand your philosophy completely. I'll bet 75% of Bolt owners consider it a commuter car with a "I don't have to charge it every night" range. I don't consider 200 miles per day a "commute", but I know lots of people who drive 50-60 miles each way to get to work & home again. That 100-120 miles can be made up with only 5 hours of overnight charging, making the Bolt a GREAT EV in that role. They may never charge away from home, DCFC OR Level 2. Many of these people consider even a "30 minutes past finishing my meal" wait an unacceptable inconvenience. But, many of us have shown that with a little advance planning, putting that rest stop at a mealtime, with a DCFC nearby, and a "destination charger" at your (what else?) destination, a 400 mile trip in a day CAN easily be accomplished with that 30 minute wait.
 

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Back in January, Chevrolet released the Bolt?s state-by-state distribution plan and as promised, their first long-range electric vehicle is now available at dealerships nationwide in the U.S.

As the first to market, beating the Tesla Model 3 and next generation Nissan Leaf, the Bolt EV amassed a large following and according to Autoguide, Chevy has sold 11,670 Bolt EVs this year. If you tack on the sales made since last December, that?s an impressive 12,249 vehicles.

Of course an affordable starting price of $37,495 (including destination) plus a maximum of $7,500 in federal tax incentives helps as well. But most appealing may be the much touted 238 miles of range with some forum members surpassing that in real world numbers.

The long list of standard features in the LT trim including the 10.2-inch color touchscreen, Regen on Demand, and eight-year/100,000-mile limited warranty is just icing on the cake.

If you add on the Canadian Bolt sales of 866 vehicles, Chevy may hit Karl Brauer?s prediction of 30,000 to 80,000 Bolt EVs sold before the end of the year.
No local Wisconsin dealer has them.
There are hundreds of chargers all over Wisconsin.

Please try using the PlugShare app to find the ones near you.

Personally, I'm planning on driving my Bolt fro California to Milwaukee, and will be using an "RV" adaptor to connect my level 2 charger to power on I-80 where I can't find an EV station... there are tons of places along the way - PlugShare has made it possible for me to go coast to coast, stopping for meals & charging.
 

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On PlugShare, I see 10 DCFC in WI (in 3 cities). Level 2 (destination) charging on a trip means drive 100 miles, wait 4 hours, or, if you prefer, drive 240 miles, wait 10 hours.
 

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I would happily own an EV in any state, regardless of DCFC. I plan to never use one, at least until they get way better. I've got better things to do than hang around for an hour to charge.
Drove my Bolt on a 300 mile round trip this past Sunday. Visited relatives in a city with DCFC. We went to a shopping center where the charger is located, plugged up the car, bummed around the book store, had lunch, drank coffee. Car was fully charged for return leg. No hassle. Great fun. Fun time just chillin'. Plan to do it again soon!
 

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I would happily own an EV in any state, regardless of DCFC. I plan to never use one, at least until they get way better. I've got better things to do than hang around for an hour to charge.
Buy the new Porshe Mission E (if you have $85+K). It will charge to full in 15 minutes (once they deploy the 350 kW ultracharger).
 

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The 2017 Chevy Bolt EV is now available in my home territory of Puerto Rico. There is a GM dealer named Benitez Auto in Caguas, a city in the center of Puerto Rico (I bought a 1995 Buick Regal there), that now offers and services the Bolt EV. Here is a link to their inventory page which shows five models.:
http://www.benitezauto.com/inventario/?MARCA=Chevrolet&MODELO=Bolt+EV&page=1

I did see the white Bolt EV close up, and my wife, who drives a 2009 Equinox, likes it very much. She sat in the driver's seat and likes the higher driving position than what most compacts offer. The Bolt EV does look small from a distance because it is tall (about 62 inches) but it is spacey inside. I am 72 inches tall, I sat in the back seats, my head had plenty of headroom, and I had enough knee room. So it is a "compact" version of our Equinox, except that the cargo area is much smaller. That itself isn't much of an issue because we rarely have to carry large cargo.

As soon as we compete several long-term loans, probably by 2019, we will buy our first EV which can be the Chevy Bolt EV or a new GM EV. If I can, I will try to get pictures later at the dealer and post them here.
 

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Every home has a charging infrastructure

Unlike the West Coast, charging infrastructure does not exist IN EVERY STATE. Only hardcore tree huggers are willing to take the risk. Chicken/egg problem revisited.
Not true! Every home has 115 VAC outlets, making the "charging infrastructure" 99% available (unless you live in an isolated shack in the mountains). Yet, can you get gasoline as easy as a charge?

Every EV comes with a portable Level 1 EVSE for the common 115 VAC outlets. Serious EV owners will add/install a Level 2 230 VAC for a faster charge. And most will be charging overnight while the owners sleep.

So your post is incorrect except for the isolated homes that have no electrical power.
 

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The 2017 Chevy Bolt EV is now available in my home territory of Puerto Rico. There is a GM dealer named Benitez Auto in Caguas, a city in the center of Puerto Rico (I bought a 1995 Buick Regal there), that now offers and services the Bolt EV. Here is a link to their inventory page which shows five models.:
http://www.benitezauto.com/inventario/?MARCA=Chevrolet&MODELO=Bolt+EV&page=1

I did see the white Bolt EV close up, and my wife, who drives a 2009 Equinox, likes it very much. She sat in the driver's seat and likes the higher driving position than what most compacts offer. The Bolt EV does look small from a distance because it is tall (about 62 inches) but it is spacey inside. I am 72 inches tall, I sat in the back seats, my head had plenty of headroom, and I had enough knee room. So it is a "compact" version of our Equinox, except that the cargo area is much smaller. That itself isn't much of an issue because we rarely have to carry large cargo.

As soon as we compete several long-term loans, probably by 2019, we will buy our first EV which can be the Chevy Bolt EV or a new GM EV. If I can, I will try to get pictures later at the dealer and post them here.
Awesome! You can finally get your long awaited GM EV Raymond.
 

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As soon as we compete several long-term loans, probably by 2019, we will buy our first EV which can be the Chevy Bolt EV or a new GM EV. If I can, I will try to get pictures later at the dealer and post them here.
Hello Raymond, Glad to hear you finally have the opportunity to get a GM EV.:D
 

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Not true! Every home has 115 VAC outlets, making the "charging infrastructure" 99% available (unless you live in an isolated shack in the mountains). Yet, can you get gasoline as easy as a charge?

Every EV comes with a portable Level 1 EVSE for the common 115 VAC outlets. Serious EV owners will add/install a Level 2 230 VAC for a faster charge. And most will be charging overnight while the owners sleep.

So your post is incorrect except for the isolated homes that have no electrical power.
When traveling, a 110v outlet will provide 3-4 miles of range per hour, so that’s great if you have access to an outlet and two days to kill while waiting for your Bolt to fully charge.

Charging infrastructure, or lack thereof, remains a significant barrier to EV ownership in many parts of the country.

What’s needed is 99% available fast charging, and that fast charging really needs to be fast, not half-fast. Nobody wants to wait an hour, or even a half hour before getting back on the road.

You’ll find lots of posts on the internet about successful long range EV road trips, and most reveal a good deal of planning is needed for an anxiety free trip. Nobody posts about refueling on a long range road trip in an ICE vehicle, since refueling infrastructure is ubiquitous. That’s simply not true for EV charging.
 

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Not true! Every home has 115 VAC outlets, making the "charging infrastructure" 99% available (unless you live in an isolated shack in the mountains). Yet, can you get gasoline as easy as a charge?

Every EV comes with a portable Level 1 EVSE for the common 115 VAC outlets. Serious EV owners will add/install a Level 2 230 VAC for a faster charge. And most will be charging overnight while the owners sleep.

So your post is incorrect except for the isolated homes that have no electrical power.
When traveling, a 110v outlet will provide 3-4 miles of range per hour, so that’s great if you have access to an outlet and two days to kill while waiting for your Bolt to fully charge.

Charging infrastructure, or lack thereof, remains a significant barrier to EV ownership in many parts of the country.

What’s needed is 99% available fast charging, and that fast charging really needs to be fast, not half-fast. Nobody wants to wait an hour, or even a half hour before getting back on the road.

You’ll find lots of posts on the internet about successful long range EV road trips, and most reveal a good deal of planning is needed for an anxiety free trip. Nobody posts about refueling on a long range road trip in an ICE vehicle, since refueling infrastructure is ubiquitous. That’s simply not true for EV charging.
I have to disagree with you, Raymondjram. L1 charging can be okay if you have a short commute (30 miles or less) and you charge while you sleep (8 hrs so 24-32 miles of range recouped). Factor in some heating or the odd errand after work and I think most commuters would need at least 10 hrs of charging every night for a 30 mile commute. TimBolt already covered the long-range travel pretty well already.

Some people can made do with L1 with longer commutes (50 miles) if they can accept a range deficit throughout the week until they can recharge more on the weekends (like 36 hrs of charging over the weekend). It's going to be tough, though. That's also assuming they have good outlets that can handle the constant 12A load without melting parts of the outlet run ("just say no to back-stab outlets!").

BTW, congrats on having a possible path forward to a GM EV! Given the storm you recently went through, I'd personally go with a Volt for it's generator capability, though.
 

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I have to disagree with you, Raymondjram. L1 charging can be okay if you have a short commute (30 miles or less) and you charge while you sleep (8 hrs so 24-32 miles of range recouped). Factor in some heating or the odd errand after work and I think most commuters would need at least 10 hrs of charging every night for a 30 mile commute.
While this is true, one has to wonder why someone with such modest driving needs would want to pay for a car with a 60kWh battery pack...

On the other hand, most people with access to a 120V outlet could convert it to a 240V outlet for a pretty minimal cost, and they could use that with the stock EVSE (as I do) to double their charge rate. That gives you around 100 miles after a 12-hour charge, which is a pretty decent range. And if you normally keep the car charged to Hilltop Reserve levels or more, that gives you the ability to take the occasional longer trip without worries.
 
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