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I have a Chevy Bolt 2017 that came in with a standard L1 charging cable. Recently I got a NEMA 14-50 wall port installed. I'm looking for an adapter that will connect the Chevy cable to the 14-50 port. Could you please recommend any good inexpensive ones?
 

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camco 55255
this is the best choice I have found. I made 2 adapters for my use. The last one I got from Home Depot. $ 18 or so
 

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Use a 20 amp 3 prong female socket and get about 1 foot of 8 gauge wire. You don’t use the bare ground wire. The red and black wires are hot and the white is the ground.
Do a google search on this adapter there is last of info
 

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That is a great choice as well !
note : I’m not an electrician so take my advice with a grain of salt ! Case in point : in my last post the white wire is the neutral ( not the ground ).
 

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Welcome to the forum. If you're not into making your own, there's several options available.
I'll usually point people to the my240 two part adapter as one source. You buy this one and another mating adapter to get to your 14-50.
Unfortunately, that one is now out-of-stock. I might need to reach out to Quick Charge Power and see if they will be making more.
 

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Thank you. Looks like it is out of stock.
There's the @p7wang option here:
 

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You can certainly make your own from parts at any big-box home improvement store. Since the adapter is going from a 14-50P to a 5-15R (or 5-20R) and will be used only for the OEM EVSE that takes 12A maximum, you can use #12AWG for the connecting cable. Technically, you could use #14AWG, but the #12AWG will give you some additional margin. I like margin.

Note: #14AWG is typically rated for 15A max, 12A continuous*, and #12AWG is typically rated for 20A max, 16A continuous*.

*The NEC recommends that you only draw 80% of a circuit's rated capacity, continuously.
 

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Looks like you will need to build your own. If I were doing it, I would buy a short #12AWG extension cord (see below from Amazon) and cut off the male plug leaving only a foot or so of cord beyond the female plug and then attach it to 14-50 plug.
Connect the black to the black terminal of the 14-50, the white to the red terminal of the 14-50 and the green to the ground.
When finished I would probably wrap red tape around the female end with a warning tab to only use with you EVSE.


 

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thank you. My bolt is leased, not sure if they will allow adapter replacement. I was looking for something that had a standard 3 point at the back and the NEMA 14-50 male in front, if something like that is avaiable.
Very few of these exist out in the wild because they don't conform to code. I don't think Jaymac was suggesting cutting off the 5-15 plug on your OEM EVSE. Typically one would cut off the end of a heavy duty extension cord, then wire the cut end to the plug he suggested.

Be aware that any adapter that converts 240V to a 5-15 plug (which is 120V) is a danger. People use the differences in plugs to ensure that only the correct equipment can be plugged in. All of these adapters present 240V on a 120V socket. Extra care needs to be taken so that someone doesn't inadvertently plug in a 120V device and release the magic smoke that makes it go.

The My240 adapter as two pieces are a bit better because if they are separated at the 6-20 junction, then the remaining end is a 240V socket that cannot easily be mistreated.

If you want to do this DIY with no wiring, the "magic" adapter is the TopoLite 120V/240V Grow Light Adapter: TopoLite Plug Adapters 2-Pack 120V to 240V for Hydroponic Indoor Plants Growing Grow Light Fixture Kit Accessories (2Pcs(120 to 240V)):Amazon:Patio, Lawn & Garden

Couple it with a 14-50 to 6-20 adapter: NEMA 14-50P to 6-15R 6-20R 240V 20 Amp Welder Welding Dryer EV Charger Power Cord Adapter Adaptor Connector Connecter:Amazon:Computers & Accessories

And you've essentially made your own My240, no wiring necessary.

ga2500ev
 

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2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV Premier w/ driver confidence 2 and infotainment packages in Silver Mist
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To get the full benefits of the 220V outlet you had installed, the ideal is to purchase an actual level 2 charging cable. They cost anywhere from $150 for a 16A to $400+ for a 40A wall mounted.

The 16A Level 2 choice will give you a faster charge than the OEM charging cable no matter which current you run on because the OEM is still a level 1 either voltage plugged into.

It is a small but practical investment to make if you are serious about the EV you have leased. And you can re-sell it on eBay etc if you decide at the end of the lease that an EV is not for you.
 

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To get the full benefits of the 220V outlet you had installed, the ideal is to purchase an actual level 2 charging cable. They cost anywhere from $150 for a 16A to $400+ for a 40A wall mounted.

The 16A Level 2 choice will give you a faster charge than the OEM charging cable no matter which current you run on because the OEM is still a level 1 either voltage plugged into.

It is a small but practical investment to make if you are serious about the EV you have leased. And you can re-sell it on eBay etc if you decide at the end of the lease that an EV is not for you.
I think the biggest advantages of this setup are cost and mobility. Yes, $150 isn't a lot of money, but you're buying a whole separate unit when you got a perfectly good unit with your car. Also, this setup enables you to use your stock EVSE on the road. In particular, ga2500ev's suggestion enables you to spend just a few bucks here or there on 240 V cables so that you can use your stock EVSE at a relative's house on an old dryer socket or at campsites and RV parks. Taking a full day (24 hours) to recharge the car might not seem great, but it's better than the 2+ days the stock EVSE requires on 120 V.

A 16 A unit is faster, it's true, but if you're going to spend that much extra money to purchase a faster unit, why not just buy a 32 A to 40 A unit?
 

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To get the full benefits of the 220V outlet you had installed, the ideal is to purchase an actual level 2 charging cable. They cost anywhere from $150 for a 16A to $400+ for a 40A wall mounted.

The 16A Level 2 choice will give you a faster charge than the OEM charging cable no matter which current you run on because the OEM is still a level 1 either voltage plugged into.

It is a small but practical investment to make if you are serious about the EV you have leased. And you can re-sell it on eBay etc if you decide at the end of the lease that an EV is not for you.
There is an eternal debate as to the appropriate level of charging at home an EV owner should have. Much like range and fast charging, it's a numbers game. It comes down to if in a year with approximately 350 charges, if 5 of them require a faster charger (about 1.4%), is it worth investing in a faster EVSE to support those charges?

BTW Level 1 vs Level 2 AC charging is based strictly on voltage. Even charging at 12 amps on a 240V circuit is considered Level 2 charging.

The risk assessment is what to do when one of those 5 charges comes along. If there is no backup plan, then Martin is correct that purchasing a faster EVSE may be the right move. However, if a backup is available in terms of a faster public charger nearby, then the need isn't as pressing.

My personal solution was purchasing a used Bosch 30A for under $200, coupled with an extension cord that plugs into the dryer circuit. Daily I still charge at 120V using the OEM EVSE. On the rare day I need a second faster charge, which averages about once every 2 months or so, I swap the dryer plug with the extension cord, plug in the Bosch and throw the 500E on the charger for an hour or two so that I can roll out again.

Eventually I'll put in a permanent 240V circuit, I guess. But it just doesn't seem pressing to do so with the rarity of really needing that extra charge.

It's all a matter of risk assessment.

ga2500ev
 

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I think the biggest advantages of this setup are cost and mobility. Yes, $150 isn't a lot of money, but you're buying a whole separate unit when you got a perfectly good unit with your car. Also, this setup enables you to use your stock EVSE on the road. In particular, ga2500ev's suggestion enables you to spend just a few bucks here or there on 240 V cables so that you can use your stock EVSE at a relative's house on an old dryer socket or at campsites and RV parks. Taking a full day (24 hours) to recharge the car might not seem great, but it's better than the 2+ days the stock EVSE requires on 120 V.

A 16 A unit is faster, it's true, but if you're going to spend that much extra money to purchase a faster unit, why not just buy a 32 A to 40 A unit?
Completely agree. I went for a Bosch 40A wall charger even though when purchased it was for a Volt.

The OP didn’t mention the service size of the 220V outlet he had installed. It could range from a 30A to a 50A or even higher.

Without knowing the size of the circuit breaker and wire he had installed, it’s kind of tough to recommend something that when plugged in just repeatedly trips the breaker.

I also wasn’t considering the “away from home “ charging aspect of the OEM cable. I haven’t worried about the charge rate out and about, but the portable level 2 cable would be an improvement there also, as long as a 220V outlet is available.

Makes me think about getting one for portable use. But that’s just me. A $150 purchase is small potatoes for convenience.
 

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I bought an after market L2 32A EVSE because I wanted to have a 2nd unit that also charges at full speed. I plan on a road trip next year and this will allow me to sleep in the car at a RV park while the Bolt recharges over 8-9 hours. @ 240V 12A, it would take about 20 hours to go from empty to full - way too long.
 
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I bought an after market L2 32A EVSE because I wanted to have a 2nd unit that also charges at full speed. I plan on a road trip next year and this will allow me to sleep in the car at a RV park while the Bolt recharges over 8-9 hours. @ 240V 12A, it would take about 20 hours to go from empty to full - way too long.
Using the OEM EVSE to charge an EV on a road trip is like trying to use a screwdriver to move a boulder: it isn't the right tool for the job.

Like I said previously, there are a few times a year where a faster, or in the case of a road trip, a much faster, charging scheme is needed. You point out how rare we're talking about with a road trip next year.

BTW, why not just stay at a hotel with a destination charger? It's likely that a campground owner is going to charge you a full night just to park and charge, right?

ga2500ev
 

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Using the OEM EVSE to charge an EV on a road trip is like trying to use a screwdriver to move a boulder: it isn't the right tool for the job.

Like I said previously, there are a few times a year where a faster, or in the case of a road trip, a much faster, charging scheme is needed. You point out how rare we're talking about with a road trip next year.

BTW, why not just stay at a hotel with a destination charger? It's likely that a campground owner is going to charge you a full night just to park and charge, right?

ga2500ev
RV parks with NEMA14-50 are a dime a dozen in some places. Hotels with L2 EVSE, unfortunately not as common (yet).
 
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