Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
The charger is in the car. What you are talking about is the portable EVSE that supplies wall voltage to the car. It already is capable of operating at 240V with the addition of a pigtail adapter. What it sounds like is you want GM to provide that pigtail and actually officially acknowledge the ability of the existing EVSE to operate on 240V.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
What they should do is take a page from Tesla’s playbook and provide a portable EVSE that has a 240V end on it, and then offer pigtails that provide 120V only, or adapt to other 240V plug sources. Less chance of someone leaving the wrong pigtail plugged into an outlet that is providing 240V and providing a 120V looking receptacle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
What they should do is take a page from Tesla’s playbook and provide a portable EVSE that has a 240V end on it, and then offer pigtails that provide 120V only, or adapt to other 240V plug sources. Less chance of someone leaving the wrong pigtail plugged into an outlet that is providing 240V and providing a 120V looking receptacle.
The 2018 LEAF EVSE (aka charge cord) has also gone to that model. 30 kW L2 out of the box with 14-50P and adapter for 120.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
What they should do is take a page from Tesla’s playbook and provide a portable EVSE that has a 240V end on it, and then offer pigtails that provide 120V only, or adapt to other 240V plug sources. Less chance of someone leaving the wrong pigtail plugged into an outlet that is providing 240V and providing a 120V looking receptacle.
Yes. That is what I am requesting. I carry an aftermarket 240v 3 prong and a 4 prong dryer to 120Plug adapter in my "trunk" for emergency use. I don't want to be around if someone plugs a 120v device into 240v. Sort of like what happens when you forget to set your 120/240 traveling appliance to 240v and plug into a 240 circuit :)

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I could be wrong on this but the current portable EVSE, even with the 240V pigtail is still limited to being able to supply 12A or 2.8KW The Tesla portable EVSE can supply up to 40A or 9.6KW. Quite a difference in charge speed capability even though the Bolt can only use 32A of the capability or 7.7KW. I just purchased a Tesla unit off of eBay since I already purchased the Tesla to 1722 adapter. I believe the Tesla unit has a sense of what to limit current to based on the plug/adapter connected to it so if you have a 240V 30A plug adapter instead of the 50A 14-50, it will limit its current draw to the lower limit of the type of circuit it is plugged into. Maybe someone with more experience here knows the answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
I could be wrong on this but the current portable EVSE, even with the 240V pigtail is still limited to being able to supply 12A or 2.8KW The Tesla portable EVSE can supply up to 40A or 9.6KW. Quite a difference in charge speed capability even though the Bolt can only use 32A of the capability or 7.7KW. I just purchased a Tesla unit off of eBay since I already purchased the Tesla to 1722 adapter. I believe the Tesla unit has a sense of what to limit current to based on the plug/adapter connected to it so if you have a 240V 30A plug adapter instead of the 50A 14-50, it will limit its current draw to the lower limit of the type of circuit it is plugged into. Maybe someone with more experience here knows the answer.
you are correct the Tesla UMC changes the volts/amps it reports to the car's charger based on what "adapter plug" is currently on it. If you have the NEMA 14-50 plug it will report 40 amps, if you have the Nema 10-30 adapter it will report 24 amps - if you have the NEMA 5-15 adapter it will report 120 volts @ 12 amps.

The Tesla UMC is both an L1 and L2 charger - and adapts based on what plug adapter is currently on the business end of the charger (i.e the part that goes into the plugs vs. the end that goes into the car).

A Tesla UMC is included with each Tesla you buy and comes with two adapters:

NEMA 5-15 (15 amp house hold plug 12 amp charge rate @ 120 volts)
NEMA 14-50 (50 AMP RV hookup 240 @ 40 amp charge rate @ 240 volts)

additional adapters are available for about $45 each

NEMA 5-20 (house hold 20 amp plug - 16 amp charge rate @ 120 volts) - Bolt doesn't work with this {sigh}
NEMA 6-50 (50 amp plug 3 blade straight (welder) - 40 amp charge rate @ 240 volts)
NEMA 10-30 (30 amp plug 3 blade angled (older dryer & water heater) - 24 amp charge rate @ 240 volts)
NEMA 14-30 (30 amp plug 4 blade straight (newer dryer & water heater) - 24 amp charge rate @as 240 volts)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
one last thing there are two types Tesla UMC's

1. the original Tesla UMC came with modular plugs and you can change them for different plugs and charge rates
2. a new Tesla UMC comes with a fixed (non-changable) NEMA 14-50 plug

Tesla still sells both - but #2 no longer has the adaptable plugs and therefore does not modify it's charge rate.

for maximum flexibility I recommend #1 as that has the most flexibility to charge from the widest array of plugs you might encounter in the wild. If you just want a good and portal 40 AMP charger and don't desire flexibility to charge from different types of electrical outlets #2 is still an excellent choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
the Tesla Model 3 is coming with a newer third generation mobile charger - and there is very little data - what is known is it still goes up to 40 amps, and still has module plugs - but the design of the plug-adapter is very different - more like pig-tails rather than modular plugs

the Model 3's UMC should work the same as the legacy UMC's and I'm willing to bet it would still work with a J-1772 adapter…

we'll know more once actual units escape in the wild.

Model 3 adapters are $35 each and come in the following plug types

NEMA 5-15 12 amps @ 120 volts
NEMA 5-20 16 amps @ 120 volts
NEMA 6-15 12 amps @ 240 volts
NEMA 6-20 16 amps @ 240 volts
NEMA 6-50 40 amps @ 240 volts
NEMA 10-30 24 amps @ 240 volts
NEMA 14-30 24 amps @ 240 volts
NEMA 14-50 40 amps @ 240 volts

https://shop.tesla.com/us/en/product/vehicle-accessories/model-3-nema-adapters0.html?sku=1099345-00-C
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
you are correct the Tesla UMC changes the volts/amps it reports to the car's charger based on what "adapter plug" is currently on it. If you have the NEMA 14-50 plug it will report 40 amps, if you have the Nema 10-30 adapter it will report 24 amps - if you have the NEMA 5-15 adapter it will report 120 volts @ 12 amps.

The Tesla UMC is both an L1 and L2 charger - and adapts based on what plug adapter is currently on the business end of the charger (i.e the part that goes into the plugs vs. the end that goes into the car).

A Tesla UMC is included with each Tesla you buy and comes with two adapters:

NEMA 5-15 (15 amp house hold plug 12 amp charge rate @ 120 volts)
NEMA 14-50 (50 AMP RV hookup 240 @ 40 amp charge rate @ 240 volts)

additional adapters are available for about $45 each

NEMA 5-20 (house hold 20 amp plug - 16 amp charge rate @ 120 volts) - Bolt doesn't work with this {sigh}
NEMA 6-50 (50 amp plug 3 blade straight (welder) - 40 amp charge rate @ 240 volts)
NEMA 10-30 (30 amp plug 3 blade angled (older dryer & water heater) - 24 amp charge rate @ 240 volts)
NEMA 14-30 (50 amp plug 4 blade straight (newer dryer & water heater) - 40 amp charge rate @as 240 volts)

I think you have an error on the 14-30 as it should be 30A plug and 24A charge rate. I am happy to hear that it works as I thought as I was concerned that I might blow some breakers should I use it at a friends house where they only had a 30A circuit versus a 50A circuit.

I wonder why the 5-20 does not work with a Bolt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
I think you have an error on the 14-30 as it should be 30A plug and 24A charge rate. I am happy to hear that it works as I thought as I was concerned that I might blow some breakers should I use it at a friends house where they only had a 30A circuit versus a 50A circuit.

I wonder why the 5-20 does not work with a Bolt?
you shame me with your eagle eyes pointing out my typos - I've updated the original posting to be correct.

Chevy for some blizzard reason clamps the max charge rate for 120 volts at 12 amps - so you can use a NEMA 5-20 plug - but you'll still only get 12 amps of charge rate (or 8 amps depending on the internal setting for the car).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
for the road warrior EV driver this is also a useful pig-tail to have in one's charging kit

[ame]https://www.amazon.com/Conntek-PSS21450-1-5-Feet-Generator-Connector/dp/B00BHGY95S[/ame]

it converts marine shore power (or concert venue power) to a standard NEMA 14-50 plug - there are more of these that you may know about and it another little trick for charging an EV if you have one of these in your kit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
787 Posts
you shame me with your eagle eyes pointing out my typos - I've updated the original posting to be correct.

Chevy for some blizzard reason clamps the max charge rate for 120 volts at 12 amps - so you can use a NEMA 5-20 plug - but you'll still only get 12 amps of charge rate (or 8 amps depending on the internal setting for the car).
Pretty much all portable EVSEs do this, Tesla probably being the only exception. I guess the assumption is that if you encounter a 120V plug in the wild, it’s assumed that it’s on a 15A circuit. Not everybody knows the difference between a 5-15 and a 5-20 plug. I have only found one third-party EVSE that will do 16A on a 120V connection, and that was a hardwired unit from ClipperCreek.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
If any such Chevy people are here, I wish they'd work to get DC fast chargers installed in more places, not just at dealers.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top