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https://www.ocweekly.com/to-live-and-die-in-the-arizona-desert-in-a-2018-chevy-bolt-ev-premier/

When I read the following line, I knew this report wasn't going to end well: But the rep said that based on the distance to the destination (350 miles), the Bolt would make it after one, half-hour stop at a fast-charging station, because the EV’s range on a full charge is 200 miles."

Despite the multiple face palms, but article is actually written fairly well (on a technical basis). The guy made so many n00b mistakes though, it was laughable. I guess the takeaway is "Don't let BEV n00bs road trip a BEV". And this guy was supposedly pretty well versed on EVs. Yikes.
 

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https://www.ocweekly.com/to-live-and-die-in-the-arizona-desert-in-a-2018-chevy-bolt-ev-premier/

When I read the following line, I knew this report wasn't going to end well: But the rep said that based on the distance to the destination (350 miles), the Bolt would make it after one, half-hour stop at a fast-charging station, because the EV’s range on a full charge is 200 miles."

Despite the multiple face palms, but article is actually written fairly well (on a technical basis). The guy made so many n00b mistakes though, it was laughable. I guess the takeaway is "Don't let BEV n00bs road trip a BEV". And this guy was supposedly pretty well versed on EVs. Yikes.
Yeah. The "rep" doesn't understand the details, and assumed you'd get a fill-up during the half-hour. At the typical 40kW DCFC, you'll get about 75 miles additional range during the half-hour charge, assuming your SOC is near the bottom, rather than the top. I'd plan on stopping three times for a 350 mile trip. At ~180 miles (~50 mi. of charge remaining), again at ~250 miles (~50 mi. of charge remaining), and again at 325 miles. I tend to be very conservative when it comes to remaining charge margin. It could certainly be done with two half-hour stops at a DCFC, with a smaller margin. I'm planning on a 230 mile road trip from OC to Paso Robles (CA) in the near future. I'll be stopping at an EV-Go station in Bakersfield for 45 minutes for a comfortable margin, and then use destination chargers in Paso.
 

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So let me get this straight:

He took a brand new EV car, loaded to capacity, on a long trip, had to be at his destination at a very specific time, with no real planning, and expected everything to work perfectly?

Not good.............

For a supposed EV fanatic, this was just silly.

EV's are in their infancy at this point. They will get there, but this article did nothing to help advance EV adoption.

JMHO

Jim I - Very Happy 2012 Volt & 2017 Bolt Owner
 

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Did my duty and left my comment. I have a family member with a Tesla who went through a similar fiasco, but without a baby involved. I guess some folks have to learn the hard way.. Hey at least its learning.

Speculation: if he went 55 in the slow lane everything would have gone smoother?
 

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LOL... this was a great read. Thank you for posting it. As I was reading I kept SMH. He made a ton of rookie mistakes. I went on a short 230 mile r/t and was plotting multiple charge locations, in case they were busy and also plotted Level 3 and Level 2 chargers. I am sure his next trip will involve more planning and flexibility (in time).


https://www.ocweekly.com/to-live-and-die-in-the-arizona-desert-in-a-2018-chevy-bolt-ev-premier/

When I read the following line, I knew this report wasn't going to end well: But the rep said that based on the distance to the destination (350 miles), the Bolt would make it after one, half-hour stop at a fast-charging station, because the EV’s range on a full charge is 200 miles."

Despite the multiple face palms, but article is actually written fairly well (on a technical basis). The guy made so many n00b mistakes though, it was laughable. I guess the takeaway is "Don't let BEV n00bs road trip a BEV". And this guy was supposedly pretty well versed on EVs. Yikes.
 

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Cynical speculation: If he had done a little research there would be no story to write. But I guess this example does stand as what *could* happen no matter how cynically one views it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cynical speculation: If he had done a little research there would be no story to write. But I guess this example does stand as what *could* happen no matter how cynically one views it.
The above report reminded me of the GreenCarReports article on the Bolt owner that attempted an 800 mile road trip driving 80 mph on the highway. :rolleyes: Maybe the author of this article can redeem himself with his actual Bolt review article upcoming.
 

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Automotive Munchhausen Syndrome. The writer caused his own problems so he could write about them.
Either that, or he's a complete noodle-head. No one with any EV knowledge would have done so poorly.
Claims to have done a bunch of planning ahead of the trip, but it's obvious that he didn't, unless it was planning
ways to end up sitting on the curb eating a burrito and drinking beer out of a paper bag so he could write about it.
Class act. NOT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Automotive Munchhausen Syndrome. The writer caused his own problems so he could write about them.
Either that, or he's a complete noodle-head. No one with any EV knowledge would have done so poorly.
Claims to have done a bunch of planning ahead of the trip, but it's obvious that he didn't, unless it was planning
ways to end up sitting on the curb eating a burrito and drinking beer out of a paper bag so he could write about it.
Class act. NOT.
I've bolded my guess. :p

I would definitely vote for trying to create a story, except he subjected his family to the horror show road trip. No one would do that on purpose, would they?
 

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Anyone else think he may be a Tesla fan-boy trying to pretend he loved the Bolt until his horror show road trip? The last line of the article was "Buy a Tesla"...

We only have his word for it that he subjected his family to this fiasco... if he did it on purpose (and had his family along) he is a sadistic jackass. If he did it on purpose and lied about having the family along including the baby projectile vomiting AND having diarrhea in the Bolt EV then he is a lying jackass.

If he did not do this on purpose, then he doesn't have the right to call himself an EV enthusiast, let alone and EV journalist. I researched extensively before purchasing my Volt that I used to have, at the time it was the correct solution for me due to the short legs on all reasonably priced EV's. Now that the Bolt EV has arrived I made the leap to full EV. I did this knowing that I can shop in Memphis (70 mile drive) or another major city that is also around the same distance, but that even with the CCS port I currently will need to take the two seater Miata if my wife and I want to take a road trip, or rent a car if some of her extended family are staying with us and we want to do a road trip. My area of the country has zero CCS charging stations within range of the Bolt EV, but within the next few years paths to the East, West, and North will open up... not to the South though. I knew all this before even test driving the Bolt EV, and charging infrastructure was the only thing that made me consider the Tesla 3, but I hate the interface, and the "affordable" model 3 will have less range than the Bolt EV (if they ever even bother to produce it). I expect Telsa to drop the stripped down model 3 from the options list due to "lack of demand" when people either get an upgraded one or get their deposit back rather than wait years more for the stripped down version to become available.

Keith
 

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Something isn't adding up. The total trip is 350 miles; they were on "empty" after only 187 miles travelled. Did they not start with a full charge? Otherwise, they had to be dragging an anchor to do so poorly. A full car might reduce range by something like 5%, so that cannot account for the poor range.

The whole fiasco could have been avoided if 1 of the 4 adults owned an ICE vehicle, or otherwise had access through someone else. I may be willing to personally waste 2hrs round trip on charging a car, but I certainly wouldn't subject 3 other people to it. Cumulatively, that's 8 human hours wasted, which isn't worth it.

Secondly, the whole fiasco could have been avoided if they would have waited for a full charge at the DCFC. Simple math suggests they need it considering a full charge only took them 187 miles, and they have 163 to go.

This should go without saying, but the failure wasn't due to the vehicle, it was due to the thinker.

Speculation: if he went 55 in the slow lane everything would have gone smoother?
Each long distance trip has its own complicated math to determine ideal speed. I have worked out that in general, 75 MPH is the most time efficient speed assuming DCFC locations are ideally located. That said, DCFC are not ideally located, so 75 MPH is a guideline and not a rule. In general, going faster than 75 MPH is not time efficient because you spend more time charging, offsetting the marginal amount of time saved by going faster. In practice, traveling at the fastest average speed you can while maintaining the efficiency needed to reached your planned DCFC location is most efficient.
 

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Something isn't adding up. The total trip is 350 miles; they were on "empty" after only 187 miles travelled. Did they not start with a full charge? Otherwise, they had to be dragging an anchor to do so poorly. A full car might reduce range by something like 5%, so that cannot account for the poor range.
That or just driving 80MPH+, that will reduce the range easily to <200 miles.
 

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The whole fiasco could have been avoided if 1 of the 4 adults owned an ICE vehicle, or otherwise had access through someone else.
Yep this point cannot be over stressed. This scenario will never need to be addressed for 99% of people.

And if the other 1% can plan properly it won't end up a fiasco.
 

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E Drivetrain Future said:
That jacklegged author sure is on collossal jewel of an ignoramus for writing about his pee poor trip planning. Glad he's not an aviator!
beeguz said:
He made stupid mistakes and those mistakes made him pay, stupid costs you.
bro1999 said:
I would definitely vote for trying to create a story, except he subjected his family to the horror show road trip. No one would do that on purpose, would they?
Fivedoor said:
We only have his word for it that he subjected his family to this fiasco... if he did it on purpose (and had his family along) he is a sadistic jackass. If he did it on purpose and lied about having the family along including the baby projectile vomiting AND having diarrhea in the Bolt EV then he is a lying jackass.

If he did not do this on purpose, then he doesn't have the right to call himself an EV enthusiast, let alone and EV journalist...
redpoint5 said:
The whole fiasco could have been avoided if 1 of the 4 adults owned an ICE vehicle, or otherwise had access through someone else. I may be willing to personally waste 2hrs round trip on charging a car, but I certainly wouldn't subject 3 other people to it. Cumulatively, that's 8 human hours wasted, which isn't worth it.

Secondly, the whole fiasco could have been avoided if they would have waited for a full charge at the DCFC. Simple math suggests they need it considering a full charge only took them 187 miles, and they have 163 to go.

This should go without saying, but the failure wasn't due to the vehicle, it was due to the thinker...
hatchy said:
Yep this point cannot be over stressed. This scenario will never need to be addressed for 99% of people.

And if the other 1% can plan properly it won't end up a fiasco...
 

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Each long distance trip has its own complicated math to determine ideal speed. I have worked out that in general, 75 MPH is the most time efficient speed assuming DCFC locations are ideally located. That said, DCFC are not ideally located, so 75 MPH is a guideline and not a rule. In general, going faster than 75 MPH is not time efficient because you spend more time charging, offsetting the marginal amount of time saved by going faster. In practice, traveling at the fastest average speed you can while maintaining the efficiency needed to reached your planned DCFC location is most efficient.

In WV, we have no 75 mph speed limits on the Interstate highways. Seventy mph is the standard/maximum. AND, we have NO CCS DCFC within the State borders. Heading East, the nearest DCFC (400 volt, 100 amp @ plug-in) is 226 miles from my home, in VA. My route started at 500’ MSL, climbed to 2500’ MSL, and the charging station was at 1500’ MSL. My plan, which worked well, was to set cruise control at 60 mph and drive in the slow lane. I pulled in with a 20 mile range reserve. I charged and drove the next leg of 200 miles (descending to 150’ MSL) @ 65-70 mph without breaking a sweat.
 

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surgeonFWW said:
In WV, we have no 75 mph speed limits on the Interstate highways. Seventy mph is the standard/maximum. AND, we have NO CCS DCFC within the State borders. Heading East, the nearest DCFC (400 volt, 100 amp @ plug-in) is 226 miles from my home, in VA. My route started at 500’ MSL, climbed to 2500’ MSL, and the charging station was at 1500’ MSL. My plan, which worked well, was to set cruise control at 60 mph and drive in the slow lane. I pulled in with a 20 mile range reserve. I charged and drove the next leg of 200 miles (descending to 150’ MSL) @ 65-70 mph without breaking a sweat.
Nice. You made a rational plan and stuck with it.
You are obviously NOT a noodle-head!
 
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