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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if anyone had tried to connect a higher wattage dc inverter to the 12V battery terminals (while the Bolt is running/on) to get a long-lasting supply of 120V A/C.

I know that gasoline cars can support 1000-2000W when running and the inverter connected directly to the 12V battery terminals, but I don't now if an EV has the same current/wattage capacity as a gasoline car since the battery never needs to 'crank' the 'engine' to get it started. Ideally, a 1500W pure sine wave inverter would allow me to run a fair number of my home's appliances in an emergency situation for more than a 1-2 days.

I know I can buy smaller dc-2-ac inverters that plug in to the accessory port, but those are limited to about 200W.

Any experience/advice is appreciated.

Allan
 

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Wish I could help, but your whole post just went over my head. When in doubt, maybe one of the mods has the answer.
 

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The 12 VDC battery by itself can supply many watts of power, but it the Bolt EV is on, the power comes from the HVDC-LVDC converter, which is limited to much less. Go to "gm-volt.com" and see what Volt owners have done, since the two vehicles share similar components and functions.
 

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According to the Bolt EV engineer in a Youtube video, the Bolt EV inverter can supply 1.6 kW continuously to the 12V battery. This silly forum won't let me post a link to the video because I have not yet made a sufficient number of posts, but if you do a Google search with the following keywords, the video is the top hit: "Chevy Bolt EV battery and electronics youtube"

The engineer talks about it near the end of the video. Start watching the video at 10:50.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Many thanks! Funny that the guy doing the interview asked the question -- even the engineer pointed out he'd never been asked the question before.

Allan
 

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...the engineer pointed out he'd never been asked the question before.
I'm surprised. It seems so obvious that when you have a huge storage battery parked in the garage and the power goes out, there might be some way to make use of the stored electricity. Inverters should be familiar to at least some potential Bolt customers.

Kinda related - an electrical engineer hooked up his Prius this way, with a 12v inverter powering the critical appliances in his house. But he pointed out Prius has a huge capacity 12 volt system because the engine gets re-started so often. His Prius started its engine and recharged the 12v battery every few hours. He said no way was he going to tap into the high voltage battery, however.

With no need to power a starter motor, I'm surprised that Bolt has a sufficiently robust 12v system to do much beyond maintaining the car's own systems.
 

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It's an neat idea but I think your better off getting a generator. More power, more reliable, designed for the use and can run indefinitely. Downside is the noise, but I think they have quiet ones.

I mean, I can run down my car battery to power my computers or fridge, but maybe I want to go somewhere later? And it's a PITA, I have to hook all this up, run extension cords, pull the fridge to get to it's plug (not easy), etc. Also note that these inverters output a crappy modified sine, maybe your electronics doesn't like it. Speaking of which, you may not know but EV's can be sensitive to this also. At work they put the EVSE's on the solar side of the circuit with the big industrial inverters. A noisy environment they didn't like. Being an engineering company guys took power system measurements and found the noise, so eventually they rerouted to be on the service side of the connection.

My solution is I have high end UPS's for all the computing equipment I run, and if the power goes down I'll let the fridge sit rather than mess with my car.
 
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