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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Same deal with the cooling loops. Anybody seen a schematic?

From digging around I believe I have determined that there are three separate loops, all connected to the radiator located directly behind the AC condenser. [Nope. Only the high power electronics loop.] The system has a coolant pump at the bottom right of the radiator, and a fan behind the radiator.

One loop is for the cabin heater, located way over on the passenger side, with its pesky reservoir we have been discussing. It runs to a standard heater core in the ductwork under the dash.

One is for the battery pack, which also has a reservoir located at the front left under the hood. It appears to have a heat exchanger below it that can boost the cooling from the radiator [Wrong!], with chilling from the AC...presumably necessary in places like the southwest. The coolant runs through a block below the AC compressor oil cooler. I looked for an AC/coolant loop connection because of this thread.

AC problem stops my bolt

"the battery relies on the A/C to maintain its proper working temperature"

The third loop uses the front right reservoir, and cools the charger/inverter/DC-DC converter, and the motor. The motor is actually cooled by the gearbox oil. But the gearbox oil is cooled by a heat exchanger on the bottom of the gearbox. The gearbox oil is pumped through one side of the heat exchanger, and coolant is pumped through the other side.

I keep hearing how simple EVs are...yeah, right.
 

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I keep hearing how simple EVs are...yeah, right.
Simpler in theory and in practice if you don't have a lot of demanding requirements. Turn of the century (20th) EV's were just a battery and a motor. ICE cars of the time already needed a bunch of stuff, pretty much what you see today. Pistons, timing, cooling/radiator, alternator and electrical. Though maybe that last part came with the invention of the starter motor, which is what killed the EV's. Henry Fords wife had an EV she loved, because it quietly and easily drove her around and didn't require hand cranking to start (which could break your arm and was hard for woman). It had a 80 mile range too (at 20 mi/hour)!

Watch Jay Leno's garage channel on YouTube, he has lots of interesting early cars, including a 1916 hybrid design and other electrics. One of the early electrics is being converted to use a modern motor and lithium batteries - but it's pretty much just a battery, motor and some lights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Today's cars should be that simple too, if we were serious about surviving. My electric assist bicycles, Zero motorcycles, and this amazing car that went around the world

http://www.evalbum.com/4713

don't require any of these complex systems, because they are designed to do exactly what personal transportation should do, and no more. All of today's cars are Faberge Eggs.
 

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Simple is relative. Compare all of that to a standard ICE and all the things it connects to and it is simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Simplicity is relative, but the requirements for our survival as a species are absolute. We must reduce CO2 emissions by 50% in ten years, and another 50% after that.....only if we care about our grandchildren.
 

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considering that the cooling loops are the most complex part of the car - and they are only necessary for passenger comfort and battery longevity - EV's are simpler than gas cars…and if the cooling loops are the most complex part of the EV then yeah we are ahead vs. complexity for ICE (which also has it's own set of cooling loops)
 

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considering that the cooling loops are the most complex part of the car - and they are only necessary for passenger comfort and battery longevity - EV's are simpler than gas cars…and if the cooling loops are the most complex part of the EV then yeah we are ahead vs. complexity for ICE (which also has it's own set of cooling loops)
Agreed! Our biggest concern IMO is not the hardware, but the software.
 

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Batteries killed the electric car, especially once roads were built to connect all the towns and cities so that lengthy trips were necessary. EVs were strictly around-town vehicles.
(Still were when the EV1 appeared decades later).
Henry Ford enlisted the aid of his good friend and neighbor Thomas Edison to build a practical battery because Ford believed electric cars to be superior in all other respects.
 

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I would challenge anyone who claims that CO2 has the ability to drastically increase global warming. CO2 levels today have made the planet greener than it has ever been during the past 10,000 years, with fewer arid areas, and able to produce more food than ever before. These very beneficial effects of the source of all life (CO2) are not contested by anyone. If our levels of CO2 were the same as they were during the Civil War, the world's population could not be fed. I have no fear of higher CO2 levels, but I do fear shortsighted attempts to destroy all man-generated CO2 emissions. THAT is something to fear.
 

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I would challenge anyone who claims that CO2 has the ability to drastically increase global warming. CO2 levels today have made the planet greener than it has ever been during the past 10,000 years, with fewer arid areas, and able to produce more food than ever before. These very beneficial effects of the source of all life (CO2) are not contested by anyone. If our levels of CO2 were the same as they were during the Civil War, the world's population could not be fed. I have no fear of higher CO2 levels, but I do fear shortsighted attempts to destroy all man-generated CO2 emissions. THAT is something to fear.
As the original topic is the Bolt's cooling system, let's try to keep on topic, eh? You've strayed the path quite a bit.
 

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As the original topic is the Bolt's cooling system, let's try to keep on topic, eh? You've strayed the path quite a bit.
True, but to be fair OP went on a hyperbolic tangent and brought the topic up in the first place - twice, IIRC. No surprise that brings out a denier.

The point is valid; folks, this is a nice forum for guys who like their cars, let's not ruin the fun so keep politics out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I get that science is polarizing. But I can't to be totally silent on this issue. Deniers trying to muzzle the facts will only work for a while longer. I want to be able to look my kids in the eye on my deathbed.
 

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I get that science is polarizing. But I can't to be totally silent on this issue. Deniers trying to muzzle the facts will only work for a while longer. I want to be able to look my kids in the eye on my deathbed.
I agree. But I also don't want the thread to devolve into the morass that I see on other fora. It is a dilemma!
 

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The point is valid; folks, this is a nice forum for guys who like their cars, let's not ruin the fun so keep politics out of it.
Basic physics is not politics. The laws of thermodynamics are not negotiable. Thinking that CO2 does not contribute to global warming is a direct violation of thermodynamic laws, and it's pure crackpottery. If you want to discuss how to solve the problem, then you might get into politics, and even morality, but the basic thermodynamics are beyond dispute by rational people.
 

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Basic physics is not politics ...
And you're talking to a PhD physicist here who knowns more about climate change than anybody you could shake a stick at :nerd:

Nuclear weapons are just physics too, need I mention why it's political? Climate change is no different, the physicists just report on the data, it's up to the civic body to decide what to do about it; that's politics and IMO not worth bringing up here. Heck I'm on your side and I find it annoying :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OK...coolant loops. Last night I went out to the garage while the car was charging. I heard a small pump sound from under the hood. I figured it had to be the coolant pump for the charger. Popped the hood, and it definitely sounded like it was coming from the front driver side area. I put my hand on the reservoir for the drive electronics loop, and could feel a faint vibration from the pump. I ran my hand down the hoses to the charger, and they were comfortably warm, as was the charger. It was cold enough in the garage that the radiator fan wasn't running. I suspect that won't be coming on until next summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Three years later. All three reservoirs are the same. They have an overflow spout on the side. When the cap is tightened enough to hear a click, the opening on the outer part of the cap is just CW from the spout. If you rotate the outer cap CCW until it is on the other side of the spout, you can see the opening on the inner cap. Put a key, or similar into the hole to lock the two cap pieces together, and you can unscrew the cap easily. It has a 1/4" long, fine thread, and an O-ring seal, so be patient. It takes maybe three turns to come off. Screwing it back on doesn't require anything as a tool. There is a racket mechanism inside the cap. Tighten it until you hear a single click, and the opening will be back where it started, just below the spout.

Reservoir cap 1.jpg Reservoir cap 2.jpg Reservoir cap 3.jpg Reservoir cap 4.jpg Text Line Font Colorfulness Parallel
 

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Learned something interesting recently. Our cars don't actually have a radiator. They use the air conditioning condenser to cool the battery coolant. Who knew right? Go to 37:50 or so.
 

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Learned something interesting recently. Our cars don't actually have a radiator.
That's because they don't use hot explosions that have to be moderated by water. There's nothing to cool in the car except for the hot, high-pressure side of the A/C loops.

Although A/C "condensers" are really radiators by any other name, they cool down the hot A/C refrigerant in exactly the same way that a radiator cools off the hot water coming out of the engine jacket.
 
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