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We've not heard about any revolutionary new care methods that might account for this. What are some theories? The only one I can come up with is that the rate of infections remains constant but the amount of testing has gone up. There is a pretty linear correlation of case count to test count (although the rate increase started mid May after the reopening began).
While these treatments may not be broadly used yet, there are several drugs that seem to be showing significant promise in calming the cytokine storms that occur in patients whose disease has progressed to the point of needing respirators. This is but one:


A more general discussion of the issue is here:

 

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My brother just recovered from COVID-19. Got to hear his tale this weekend. He was given steroids and antibiotics. He would start to feel bad and when he checked his oxygen level, it was low. Then he would take the steroid and his oxygen level would recover and he felt better. He was cleared back to work, but decided to take another COVID test just in case. His daughter is a nurse, so she gave him one of those oxygen sensors that you put on your finger.
 

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I bought a pulseoximeter several years ago just because I was curious if saturation levels drop when airplane cabins depressurize, and it was only $4. Seems like a cheap enough thing for every household to just have, like a thermometer.
 

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...so what did you find?
I need to do more testing... but my recollection is an O2 sat of ~96%. Normal is 98-99% for me. If I climb Rainier again this year, I'll try to remember to bring it along just for fun.

The first time I was aware of the concept of O2 saturation was watching a documentary on Everest where the doctors were constantly monitoring the climbers. That's what gave me the idea to see if the meters were cheap to purchase.
 

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I need to do more testing... but my recollection is an O2 sat of ~96%. Normal is 98-99% for me. If I climb Rainier again this year, I'll try to remember to bring it along just for fun.
FYI: Cabin pressure on a conventional airliner is set to be the equivalent of 8,000 feet (6,000 feet on the Boeing Dreamliner). Pilots and passengers of unpressurized aircraft are required to use supplemental oxygen if they fly above 10,000 feet for more than 30 minutes.
 

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Are those American refugees seeking asylum? :)
 
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I haven't verified this claim, but I just heard that US citizens have adopted mask wearing in public at higher rates than Canadians.
I have no doubt that in mask usage varies by region, both in Canada and the US, and that usage in some areas in one country exceeds that usage in some areas of the other country. Here in British Columbia it's common to see people wearing masks indoors but not outdoors, at least in places where social distancing can be maintained.

We have the luxury here of a very low active case rate, which reduces the risk of not wearing masks. In areas where the virus is spreading rapidly that's a lot less advisable.

But our numbers are starting to tick upward too, and we've had a widely publicized outbreak that originated with a bunch of young people holidaying in Kelowna over a long weekend. Apparently there are over 1,000 people isolating themselves because they may have been exposed.

That's an important point to remember as well - careless behaviour isn't just about the actual cases but also upon the effect on people's lives when potential exposure forces them to sideline themselves in the name of safety. If your region has decent contact tracing to alert those who may have been exposed then that latter impact is going to be for more widespread than mere case numbers would suggest.
 

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points to the study below.
Camp A adhered to the measures in Georgia’s Executive Order* that allowed overnight camps to operate beginning on May 31, including requiring all trainees, staff members, and campers to provide documentation of a negative viral SARS-CoV-2 test ≤12 days before arriving. Camp A adopted most† components of CDC’s Suggestions for Youth and Summer Camps§ to minimize the risk for SARS-CoV-2 introduction and transmission. Measures not implemented were cloth masks for campers and opening windows and doors for increased ventilation in buildings. Cloth masks were required for staff members.
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A total of 597 Georgia residents attended camp A. Median camper age was 12 years (range = 6–19 years), and 53% (182 of 346) were female. The median age of staff members and trainees was 17 years (range = 14–59 years), and 59% (148 of 251) were female. Test results were available for 344 (58%) attendees; among these, 260 (76%) were positive. The overall attack rate was 44% (260 of 597), 51% among those aged 6–10 years, 44% among those aged 11–17 years, and 33% among those aged 18–21 years (Table). Attack rates increased with increasing length of time spent at the camp, with staff members having the highest attack rate (56%). During June 21–27, occupancy of the 31 cabins averaged 15 persons per cabin (range = 1–26); median cabin attack rate was 50% (range = 22%–70%) among 28 cabins that had one or more cases. Among 136 cases with available symptom data, 36 (26%) patients reported no symptoms; among 100 (74%) who reported symptoms, those most commonly reported were subjective or documented fever (65%), headache (61%), and sore throat (46%).
 
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