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So you are saying that, since governments can clearly be bought off, the best strategy is to just let corporations do as they please. If they dump toxic waste in your drinking water, you will handle by buying a filter from them?
That is a strawman, I never said corporate actions shouldn't be regulated I said that those in government have more control over my life than a rich business man. Lets take your example though, if Corporation A is dumping toxic waste in the water the government is the one that would take action to stop and fine them. If the government is dumping toxic waste or doing illegal NSA wiretaps we as citizens have little to no power. Snowden is in Russia because he was a government whistleblower not a corporate one.
 

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That is a strawman, I never said corporate actions shouldn't be regulated I said that those in government have more control over my life than a rich business man. Lets take your example though, if Corporation A is dumping toxic waste in the water the government is the one that would take action to stop and fine them. If the government is dumping toxic waste or doing illegal NSA wiretaps we as citizens have little to no power. Snowden is in Russia because he was a government whistleblower not a corporate one.
OK. I agree that a group with armed employees has more control over me than an unarmed group. But governments aren't the only ones capable of armed violence. Corporations now, and in the past, have certainly hired mercenaries to shoot people who resist their control, even in the US, when government is weak or corrupted enough to allow it. And in many situations there is little distinction between which institutions oligarchs control.

I certainly agree that whistle blowers deserve our support, whatever they are disclosing.
 

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OK. I agree that a group with armed employees has more control over me than an unarmed group. But governments aren't the only ones capable of armed violence. Corporations now, and in the past, have certainly hired mercenaries to shoot people who resist their control, even in the US, when government is weak or corrupted enough to allow it. And in many situations there is little distinction between which institutions oligarchs control.

I certainly agree that whistle blowers deserve our support, whatever they are disclosing.
I agree that corporations can be evil like in your example when they would do union-busting. My point is that governments can be more oppressive to more people normally than a corporation, there are always exceptions that prove the rule especially when the corporation is supported by a government like the history of banana republics. I think we agree that power corrupts and I at this time see the government as a more oppressive institution, that can change of course but that is where I am at currently.
 

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I agree that corporations can be evil like in your example when they would do union-busting. My point is that governments can be more oppressive to more people normally than a corporation, there are always exceptions that prove the rule especially when the corporation is supported by a government like the history of banana republics. I think we agree that power corrupts and I at this time see the government as a more oppressive institution, that can change of course but that is where I am at currently.
So you are proposing eliminating, or ignoring, government as a solution? We will have a government in some form, whether it is armed gangs, corporate lackeys, or enlightened technocrats.
 

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Gerrymandering is a hard issue to fix because no one is unbiased...
In most democracies elections are overseen and electoral districts are allotted by an independent commission whose members are not blatantly biased politicians. It may not be perfect, but IMHO it's a far sight better than how America does it and the public has a lot more faith the process. America, for all it's pride about its democratic principles, has way too many built-in institutional flaws that work against fair representation.

That being said, you guys have your chance to make your voice heard today, if you haven't already. Good luck, my friends!
 

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So you are proposing eliminating, or ignoring, government as a solution? We will have a government in some form, whether it is armed gangs, corporate lackeys, or enlightened technocrats.
Again GJetson I am for small government not anarchy, there is a difference.
 

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In most democracies elections are overseen and electoral districts are allotted by an independent commission whose members are not blatantly biased politicians. It may not be perfect, but IMHO it's a far sight better than how America does it and the public has a lot more faith the process. America, for all it's pride about its democratic principles, has way too many built-in institutional flaws that work against fair representation.

That being said, you guys have your chance to make your voice heard today, if you haven't already. Good luck, my friends!
I agree having politicians do it is asking for more like Phil Burton who said the districts he created was his contribution to modern art. As I said in that last post I favor the shortest split-line method.
 

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This is an interesting interview. Something here for everybody. Paul Jay is a documentary film maker, and former CBC journalist. He is a left leaning guy after my own heart. He is interviewing Republican, former Colin Powell chief of staff and military history professor, retired colonel Lawrence Wilkerson. It covers lots of ground, including US dollar dominance in oil trading, and the Tesla chargers at his local BP station.

 

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Interesting article on how insensitive antigen testing is;

ACP Journals

The takeaway is that even if you test for Covid on the day you're most likely to get a positive result, it will give a false negative 20% of the time. Fortunately false positives are extremely rare, so a positive almost certainly means a person is infected.

My anecdote is that my exposure likely occurred on Oct 20th (first day my wife had symptoms). My first symptom was loss of balance on Oct 26th, and I took a Covid test that day (6 days after exposure) and it returned a false negative result. Our friend staying with us took a test the same day as me, and it too was a false negative. Worst symptoms occurred Oct 29 (9 days after exposure). I took another test Nov 3rd (14 days after exposure, 8 days after first symptoms) and it returned a positive result.

My energy dropped off a cliff last night at 8:30pm (10 days after first symptoms), and I still haven't regained full taste.

This probably doesn't make it in the top 5 worst illnesses I've had, and maybe not even top 10, but it is the strangest. Never lost taste when I'm not congested before, so that's new. Never lost balance so badly before (though I still rode my Segway). Variable energy levels depending on the day.
 

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Interesting article on how insensitive antigen testing is;

ACP Journals

The takeaway is that even if you test for Covid on the day you're most likely to get a positive result, it will give a false negative 20% of the time. Fortunately false positives are extremely rare, so a positive almost certainly means a person is infected.

My anecdote is that my exposure likely occurred on Oct 20th (first day my wife had symptoms). My first symptom was loss of balance on Oct 26th, and I took a Covid test that day (6 days after exposure) and it returned a false negative result. Our friend staying with us took a test the same day as me, and it too was a false negative. Worst symptoms occurred Oct 29 (9 days after exposure). I took another test Nov 3rd (14 days after exposure, 8 days after first symptoms) and it returned a positive result.

My energy dropped off a cliff last night at 8:30pm (10 days after first symptoms), and I still haven't regained full taste.

This probably doesn't make it in the top 5 worst illnesses I've had, and maybe not even top 10, but it is the strangest. Never lost taste when I'm not congested before, so that's new. Never lost balance so badly before (though I still rode my Segway). Variable energy levels depending on the day.
Be careful. We know people (an older couple) who got it, had recovered enough to come home from the hospital, and a few days later the husband's health collapsed and he passed away shortly afterwards.
 

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...Never lost balance so badly before (though I still rode my Segway)...
Hey, the Segway does the balancing for you! ;)

Be careful. We know people (an older couple) who got it, had recovered enough to come home from the hospital, and a few days later the husband's health collapsed and he passed away shortly afterwards.
Yeah, it seems like there are a number of cases that have longer term impacts and more niche symptoms than what you usually hear about. I haven't heard much about how prevalent these instances are, but let's hope you're not among them...
 

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Never lost balance so badly before (though I still rode my Segway).
COVID 19 as the cause of hearing disorders and vertigo/imbalance

One case series from the United Kingdom noted that >10% of COVID 19 confirmed patients self-reported auditory symptoms of hearing loss and/or tinnitus (Munro, Uus et al. 2020). A large case series from Wuhan described dizziness as a symptom in 8% of confirmed COVID 19 patients (Chen, Wu et al. 2020), though another study from Wuhan specifically querying neurological symptoms among confirmed cases of COVID 19 reported dizziness in 16.8% of patients (Mao, Jin et al. 2020). The ability of COVID 19 to cause auditory and vestibular symptoms appears to be distinct from the other SARS coronaviruses (Almufarrij, Uus et al. 2020). The mechanism by which COVID 19 may cause hearing loss, tinnitus and dizziness is unclear; since the disease appears to be capable of affecting individual cranial nerves (as happens in anosmia (Gautier and Ravussin 2020, Giacomelli, Pezzati et al. 2020, Mao, Jin et al. 2020, Mermelstein 2020, Vavougios 2020), optic neuritis (Dessau, Lisby et al. 1999) and ophthalmoparesis (Dinkin, Gao et al. 2020)), it is conceivable that it causes vestibular neuritis and/or cochlear neuritis, though this remains a conjecture requiring further study.


 

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Hey, the Segway does the balancing for you! ;)
I've got the "Mini Pro", which is made by the company that bought Segway, Ninebot. Then I paid a Russian to hack it so it goes faster and has 3x the power.

It gets dicey going down 15% grades. Seems to have a positive feedback problem on decent where a slight correction in direction introduces an increasingly severe wobble. I've crashed 4 times, but that was when I was healthy and able to bail without injury.
 
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