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2021 Bolt Premier Cajun Red Tintcoat, Grizzl-E EVSE
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I’m on the budget plan where they take last years total electricity use and averages it out over 12 months, then that is what I get charged.
A Budget plan has no finance charge, but do you understand that it does not change your electric costs in the long term? Your statement is a little like saying a credit card saves you money because you only have to make the Minimum payment. Credit Counselors call this "Death By The Month."
 

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A Budget plan has no finance charge, but do you understand that it does not change your electric costs in the long term? Your statement is a little like saying a credit card saves you money because you only have to make the Minimum payment. Credit Counselors call this "Death By The Month."
I know all that, and the budget plan is nothing like a credit card, it’s just simpler to know every month your electric bill is the same even though your electricity use fluctuates from month to month so you can plan your monthly budget, get it? Every May is settle up month where if you used more electricity during the year you pay the difference and if you use less you get a credit on your bill for the next month. I’ve had this plan for 20 years and it has always worked out well.
 

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Here in Sacramento County, the SMUD is municipally owned, and EV households pay 9.5 cents per kWH off-peak, while the average cost of gas is $5.77 / $5.96 / $6.11 a gallon.

Calculating the past 14 months of ownership of the Bolt 2020, the odometer shows 18,263 miles, which is 44 miles per day. The average efficiency is 3.5 miles/kWH. If gasoline has been at $6.11 a gallon for the past 14 months I would have paid $3,720 for gas, but only paid $495.63 for electricity.
 

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2011 Chevy Volt premier diamond white; 2022 Bolt 2LT ice bleu metallic
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Well with both of our cars charging it hasn't cost us a single cent that I can tell, but we have been charging cars here since 2011 and have 12.5K of solar on the house. With three 3ton heat pumps (2 big trane units and a Daikin mini-split with 3 heads), a 2HP inverter swimming pool pump running 4 hours a day and electric clothes dryer and all the other electrical loads our total bill last year was under $600, which in AZ is pretty much unheard of without solar. We have mostly LED lighting and are near our complete conversion as the CFLs die. There are lots of parasitic loads like Dish boxes, 2 Apple mac minis, HP printer, network router, phone charging, 5 ring cameras, etc etc.

I like driving for free, the solar has been long paid for and met its ROI many years ago.
 

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There are lots of parasitic loads like... 2 Apple Mac minis...
Those are just about the most energy efficient computers you could have -- especially the M1 models. I think they use about 39 watts under full load and 7 watts at idle. Would probably cost you about $5 each per year to leave them on all the time (from the grid).
 

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I have a separate meter with Detroit Edison in Michigan and pay .11 kw for electric 11 pm to 9 am M-F and all weekends. House rate is .16. This encourages EV owners to only use off peak electricity and saves the electric company from adding any new power plants as off-peak power is usually just wasted.

I would like to add solar and get a second EV but cost for solar is just too expensive and on my house difficult to add. Also, batteries would have to be inside in the basement to keep from freezing temperatures. Solar makes more sense for warmer sunny climates. IMO it may be better for electric companies to add more solar as they can do it with scale and use all of it during the daytime when usage is highest. Detroit Edison has put up several very small solar fields but most of this is for show and tell and not really that big compared to other large solar sites.
 

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I have a separate meter with Detroit Edison in Michigan and pay .11 kw for electric 11 pm to 9 am M-F and all weekends. House rate is .16. This encourages EV owners to only use off peak electricity and saves the electric company from adding any new power plants as off-peak power is usually just wasted.

I would like to add solar and get a second EV but cost for solar is just too expensive and on my house difficult to add. Also, batteries would have to be inside in the basement to keep from freezing temperatures. Solar makes more sense for warmer sunny climates. IMO it may be better for electric companies to add more solar as they can do it with scale and use all of it during the daytime when usage is highest. Detroit Edison has put up several very small solar fields but most of this is for show and tell and not really that big compared to other large solar sites.
I have grid tied solar, but Mass has great net metering, had it 7+ years now and recouped all my investment. I heard prices have come way down, and panels are much more efficient, mine are 255w panels and now they are all 400+w, so you need half as much, at almost half the cost.
 

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I signed up for my utility's EV TOU plan as long as I agreed to share my charging activity data via my EVSE's wifi connection. Currently as long as I charge off-peak (~2100-0700 M-F, all day Sat and Sun) I get billed at less than 4 cents/kWh (plus a distribution fee of a little over 4 cents/kWh...so about 8 cents/kWh all said and told). I use about 600 kWh per month charging my Model 3 at home. So roughly $50/month to drive 2,500 miles on average.
 

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2011 Chevy Volt premier diamond white; 2022 Bolt 2LT ice bleu metallic
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Those are just about the most energy efficient computers you could have -- especially the M1 models. I think they use about 39 watts under full load and 7 watts at idle. Would probably cost you about $5 each per year to leave them on all the time (from the grid).
Yep both M1, did notice they run way cooler than the Intel models and are way faster to boot.
 

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We are expectant Bolt EUV owners - should arrive sometime this fall!
Wife still working I am retired, she currently spends about $80 - $90/week on gas.
I have installed our 50A outlet for a home charger, we are on a Time of Use plan here for hydro, .08/Kwh between 7PM and 7AM and same deal on Sat/Sun/Holidays. So we will be charging at home for the most part, I cannot see how this would not be cheaper if we use 100Kwh/week for her daily 100KM commute. We were ready for a new car anyway as the Pontiac Vibe has a load of miles on it so the timing is perfect.
The money saved on fuel, maintenance(oil changes, filters, brakes, etc) will more than make up for any additional cost on our monthly utility bill - I figure it will be approximately $40 - $50/month vs $300+ per month in fuel costs.
No Brainer,
Mike 🇨🇦 🍁 👍
I just got rid of my 17 year old vibe. Justvgot a 2022 bolt 2lt... It is sweet
 

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Define significant....

The real question is will your gasoline bill decrease significantly? It depends on your driving, area of the country, and weather.

Let's assume you are average
  • Drive 1,250 miles a month
  • Have a gasoline vehicle getting 30 mpg
  • Buy an EV with with consumption of 3.5 miles/kWh
  • Pay the average 13.7 cents per kWh for electricity
  • Pay the average $4.22 per gallon of regular

GasolineElectric
Miles per month1,2501,250
'Fuel' Consumed41.7 gallons357 kWh
Cost of 'Fuel'$175.94$48.92
Gasoline bill drops by $175.94Electric light bill rises by $48.92

If you are average, you will save about $125 per month. Of course, if you are sharing your electric bill with a room mate, you may have to make some arrangements to be fair.
And factor in a couple oil changes!
 

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The cost of light bill is it significantly higher for home charge
For sure , use more power pay more bill ...
1st. you want to find out if there's a rate credit for EV charging , not completely uncommon .,
2nd you have to compare it to gasoline prices , 33.5 KWH , about $3,50 here , is the ( + -) equivalent of 1 gal. gasoline , most Boltergeists get around 135 miles per gal. of electricity , about 4 times the Mpg actually realized w/gas chamber car .
So how big a thing is a little bit higher power bill ?
 

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500 kwh/month X 0.16 = $80
Expect that 0.16 will be increasing soon.
 

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The cost of light bill is it significantly higher for home charge
Squeeze in free charging whenever you can. We have free charging at the supermarket, the Chevy dealer and a few other places. If you’re paying for all those electrons, you’re doing it wrong. Or you can move to an area where electricity is cheap, like here in rural Washington. Just 7.5 cents per Kwh, flat rate.
 

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Let's see:
Recent trip with the Prius. Fillups were $24 for a bit over 200 miles each, at $5.11/gallon (California, regular gas, near I-5). Car got about 45 mpg or a bit better in freeway (75-85 mph), hill-climbing (and descending), strong winds driving.

200 miles in town in my Bolt, at springtime-typical 4 miles/kwh or better, works out about $6. Granted, on the freeway, it would be closer to 3 miles/kwh, so with driving similar to the Prius trip the cost might be more like $8. That's at overnight charging rate at home with EV discount in SMUD (between $0.10-0.11/kwh).

Charging at DC stations, of course, is much more expensive. Around here, EVGo charges about $0.35/kwh off-peak plus (if you aren't paying monthly for a discount plan) a session fee, Electrify America is $0.43 off-peak. 200 miles at 4 miles/kwh at those rates would be up to $22, so not much less than for gas in the Prius - nearly even if not a tad more with a session fee or parking fee along with the power charge (as there is at many EVGo and Chargepoint sites). At 3 miles/kwh, as on a freeway run, the fuel (energy) cost would be lower to take the Prius.
 

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Here in Sacramento County, the SMUD is municipally owned, and EV households pay 9.5 cents per kWH off-peak, while the average cost of gas is $5.77 / $5.96 / $6.11 a gallon.

Calculating the past 14 months of ownership of the Bolt 2020, the odometer shows 18,263 miles, which is 44 miles per day. The average efficiency is 3.5 miles/kWH. If gasoline has been at $6.11 a gallon for the past 14 months I would have paid $3,720 for gas, but only paid $495.63 for electricity.
IIRC, SMUD recently raised rates. The "winter" EV rate is now just about 10 cents/kwh, or easily rounds to that. Check your bill. SMUD gives EV owners a 1.5 cents/kwh discount from off-peak rates for all usage (I'm sure you can figure out how to game that; my dishwasher and clothes washer, for instance, both have delay timers...) between midnight and 0600.

PS: paid $5.11 for regular at Arco in Santa Nella last week.
 

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I’m on the west side of Michigan where consumers power charges me $.07/kWh IF I set my car to charge from 11pm til 6am (which is plenty of time). I’m averaging just over $.02/mile with my Bolt vs $.20/mile with my Buick Enclave. Consumers even sends me a $20 check monthly if I only charge in my time range. Loving this car!
Now THAT is how a public utility SHOULD work!! (Totally jealous of your electric company) 🖕Pacific Graft and Extortion
 

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IIRC, SMUD recently raised rates. The "winter" EV rate is now just about 10 cents/kwh, or easily rounds to that. Check your bill. SMUD gives EV owners a 1.5 cents/kwh discount from off-peak rates for all usage (I'm sure you can figure out how to game that; my dishwasher and clothes washer, for instance, both have delay timers...) between midnight and 0600.
Again, that is how things SHOULD WORK!
🖕 for-profit power companies! Turn PG&E into a municipal owned nonprofit!!
 

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Again, that is how things SHOULD WORK!
🖕 for-profit power companies! Turn PG&E into a municipal owned nonprofit!!
Just to make you more jealous (though nobody should be charging a EV during this time), SMUD's new summer peak (5-8 PM) rate is just over 30 cents/kwh.

I've considered resetting my EVSE to run at 16A instead of 32. For overnight charges, that would extend a typical one from the present 2ish hours to over 4 (still works with a midnight-0600 EV discount). But it would also allow charging around mid-day within the output envelope of my solar panels (just a 3.8 kw nominal/3.5 typical setup, which was all SMUD would allow me to install a couple of years ago because it covered 80% of my (pre-EV) usage). SMUD no longer has net metering at all, but I'm grandfathered until 2030; they now require solar+battery for new interconnects, which makes new installs quite non-cost-effective (the battery roughly doubles the cost of a system).
 
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