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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just wondering what others have paid for having the 220 volt home charger installed.
Trying to get a ballpark range for planning.
Also, did you get someone out to give you an estimate before committing to your purchase or just roll the dice and buy the car first.
I feel like there is a bit of a chicken and egg situation here.
 

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It could cost as little as $100 and as high as $5000. I paid my electrician a little over $100 because he installed the charger right by my electrical panel. It was a very simple hard-wired installation. This could get much more expensive depending on what needs to be done. If you need to upgrade your panel to 200 A and the charger is a far distance from your electric panel it could add up very quickly. I knew my job was simple and it wouldn't cost much. If you are unsure I would contact an electrician for a quote and your options.
 

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I'd imagine there will be a pretty big variance in pricing depending on where you want your charger and where your electrical panel is. For example a lot of newer houses have the breaker panel in the garage but with mine I have a detached garage almost on the other side of the property so I expect there will be some trenching and concrete drilling required.
 

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My Clipper Creek HCS-40 was $600, and the install was $350.

The cost for install can vary quite a bit depending upon a number of details:

First, is your existing electric service adequate to support a new 40 amp breaker? If your existing panel or service need to be upgraded, figure on spending at least $1k on the install.

Second, how accessible is the EVSE location? If your electric panel is in the garage a couple of feet from where you want to install the EVSE costs will be much less than if you need to pull 100 feet of wire through your home, especially through finished spaces. 8 gauge wire isn’t cheap.

Third, what local codes and permits do you need? Many localities require permits and inspections, and those costs vary quite a bit.

Fourth, do have an existing 220 volt outlet that can be used? If you have an existing 220 volt outlet wth the proper amp breaker and wiring, and you get an EVSE with the correct matching plug, your installation cost might be $0, just screw the EVSE to the wall and plug it in. I would recommend having an electrician check the outlet, breaker, and wiring to make sure all are up to code unless you’re certain that the existing outlet meets required specs.

Fifth, do you need to charge at the full 7kw rate? Some owners use the included portable EVSE that comes with the Bolt to charge at a 3kw rate by using a plug adapter and a 220 volt outlet. Charging will be twice as slow, but you won’t need to buy an EVSE, and installing a basic 30 amp 220 volt outlet will be cheaper. You can buy an adapter for about $50 or $60 online, or make your own for less than $20 in parts if you’re handy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Fifth, do you need to charge at the full 7kw rate? Some owners use the included portable EVSE that comes with the Bolt to charge at a 3kw rate by using a plug adapter and a 220 volt outlet. Charging will be twice as slow, but you won’t need to buy an EVSE, and installing a basic 30 amp 220 volt outlet will be cheaper. You can buy an adapter for about $50 or $60 online, or make your own for less than $20 in parts if you’re handy.
That's a very interesting option that I wasn't aware of!
That would probably work just fine for me thanks!
And save me $650 up front.
 

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If you've ever done any electrical work or wiring it's as straightforward as installing any other outlet - especially if your electrical panel is already in the garage where you'll be installing the EVSE. The problem will be if your panel is full or can't support the load.

IIRC I paid $20 in materials and $100 to get it permitted by the city (for home warranty purposes).
 

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How many miles per day is your commute? As others have mentioned, you may be able to get by with a standard 120v outlet. Even if it doesn't completely charge your car every night, it might give you enough miles during the week that charging can catch back up over the weekend.

I paid about $70 in materials to self-install a 50 amp breaker, run 6 awg wire about 15 ft, and install a NEMA 14-50R receptacle.

Give us a little info about your typical daily and weekly driving habits, as well as if you have any existing unused 240v outlets, and how far the breaker panel is to where you would want the EVSE installed.

Do not wire it in yourself with lampcord! :p
 

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$500. About 40ft of wire, 20ft in open basement ceiling and 20 in finished garage wall. Includes cost of breaker and and plug. Charger, Siemens, was about another $500. Unless it is a very big money stretch, or you ONLY use your car very locally, you will probably want an L2 charger. I commute about 45mi a day, which wouldn't be a bother with a somewhat slower charger. Weekends are another matter completely. I can easily drive close to 200mi in a day. In cold weather, having a full charge to start with is pretty important and you don't want to wait hours before going to pickup some groceries once you get home. Of course where I live the charging infrastructure is pretty sparse, so your milage may very (pun intended!).
 

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Where are you located? Some states (NY for one) offer a rebate to help with the costs.
The NY rebate is for commercial use only. The rebate wording is confusing, but the installed EVSE must be used at least 50% for commercial use.
 

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If you've ever done any electrical work or wiring it's as straightforward as installing any other outlet - especially if your electrical panel is already in the garage where you'll be installing the EVSE. The problem will be if your panel is full or can't support the load.

IIRC I paid $20 in materials and $100 to get it permitted by the city (for home warranty purposes).
I’ve changed light switches and outlets, with the circuit off, of course. I never fool with the panel, there’s enough power there to kill me, even with the main breaker turned off. I’m sure a handy homeowner can safely add new circuits, but I’d rather leave that to a qualified electrician.
 

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I live in an old folks home which is a coop. The residents run the home through our elected board of directors. I convinced them to install a charging station at my assigned indoor parking spot. The wire run was pretty far from the box to my parking spot and through a couple of walls so it cost me $1400 plus $600 for the charger. One of the board members wanted to put the charger in an area where any resident could use it. That would mean I would pull into the area, charge up and then have to move my car to my assigned parking spot. Luckily my friends on the board sided with me and I merely pull into my spot, plug in and forget it.
 

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Fascinating. If the coop was funding the installation or the electricity usage, I would understand requiring coop-wide availability. But if you're capitalizing it, and you're paying the O&M, it's yours and they're just giving permission. If the coop wants to take up a separate but related motion to fit up, say, a 2-cord EVSE that can reach 6 spaces, on the coop tab, sounds like "new business" to me! :)
 

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I’ve changed light switches and outlets, with the circuit off, of course. I never fool with the panel, there’s enough power there to kill me, even with the main breaker turned off. I’m sure a handy homeowner can safely add new circuits, but I’d rather leave that to a qualified electrician.
We all have different motivations. I did mine with the panel live so my wife wouldn't notice that I was changing the house wiring for my new electric car. Had to remove four full size breakers so I could install two tandom breakers to make room for a 220V 40 amp breaker for the ESVE that came with the car. Mission accomplished and cost me $80. A month went by before she noticed the "new" outlet. I had a little explaining to do.
 

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The NY rebate is for commercial use only. The rebate wording is confusing, but the installed EVSE must be used at least 50% for commercial use.
It may appear so with the wording but they adjusted my taxes accordingly when I applied and I use a CPA for what it's worth. I know of a few others that have also claimed it for residential. I am not a CPA nor tax expert so proceed at your own risk.
 

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The local utility bought the station and I paid $160 for the install.

FWIW, how difficult depends. It ain't rocket science and in a typical garage where the breaker panel is nearby, most anyone reading this could do it himself.

jack vines
 

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It may appear so with the wording but they adjusted my taxes accordingly when I applied and I use a CPA for what it's worth. I know of a few others that have also claimed it for residential. I am not a CPA nor tax expert so proceed at your own risk.
Yes, the tax credit form can be used by either an individual or a business, although the form instructions include the caveat that the equipment must be primarily used for commercial purposes. I’m not surprised that the credit went through with the proper documentation, not sure how aggressive NY would be on checking the commercial usage requirement.
 

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We all have different motivations. I did mine with the panel live so my wife wouldn't notice that I was changing the house wiring for my new electric car. Had to remove four full size breakers so I could install two tandom breakers to make room for a 220V 40 amp breaker for the ESVE that came with the car. Mission accomplished and cost me $80. A month went by before she noticed the "new" outlet. I had a little explaining to do.
lol I'm not scared of electricity but I'd be scared to pull this off with my wife :eek:
 
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