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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Here is my latest bill. Notice the red box at the bottom. I called Eversource to inquire about the time-of-day rate and the hand-written notes are from that phone call. Basically I can save $0.02 per kwh on my Delivery charge during off peak hours (7pm to 1pm), but my on peak rate Delivery charge would jump from $0.087 to $0.155. Plus, there is an additional $2.70 monthly service charge assessed to use this bifurcated rate structure. So clearly this won't make sense for us based on the steep charge for on-peak usage, which will swamp any savings we might get off peak. The Eversource rep did however tell me we could choose a different Supplier and possibly save some money. I went to the website they suggested (puc.nh.gov) and found a long list of suppliers. One of them is 3 cents cheaper per kwh and has no cancellation fee. So, it seems like a no-brainer to switch to that supplier. Does anyone out there have experience with switching suppliers? According to Eversource nothing really changes. They continue to be my utility company for service and outages and billing. The only time I would need to deal with the supplier is if I have a disagreement with regards to the rate they charged me.


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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
When I talk about how much I pay per kWh, I mean how much they charge per kWh. Not the fees that are static. There is the base electrical rate, then about 5 or 6 other fees and taxes that are based on usage. All of those dynamic fees added up are what I consider to be my kWh rate.
If you look at my bill I posted, there is a Supply charge and a Delivery charge. Most of the delivery charge is also multiplied by usage. However, there is a fixed $13.50/month charge irrespective of usage. The number I quoted ($0.313/kwh) excluded the fixed $13.50 charge.
 

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Here is a sample from western PA. First Energy / West Penn Power. They only offer one residential rate, and no off-peak options. I can't complain, as our rates seem to be at or below average. Comes out to .128288 total.

They itemize multiple, less than clearly explained, charges. Though I will say, much fewer than some of the other examples. The bill also states that the bill includes $8.02 in PA taxes, though I am not sure where that is included... I assume the supply service?

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When I talk about how much I pay per kWh, I mean how much they charge per kWh. Not the fees that are static. There is the base electrical rate, then about 5 or 6 other fees and taxes that are based on usage. All of those dynamic fees added up are what I consider to be my kWh rate.
So then this is not what you pay. The only real way of discussing how much we all pay is to take the total payment and divide it by how much you use. Dollars per kWh. Simple. Any strategies that are used to minimize this, such as off peak pricing, will be reflected in the total.
 

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Time to invest on solar panels, you don't have to go all out. Start small and keep expanding as you see there is money to be spent.
In my state Oct-May kWh is 0.0547 and additional taxes and other fees.
May-October 0.0764 kWh.
And we are already thinking about completely going off grid because our solar power and 250 kWh battery storage is making enough energy for house and powering EVS when necessary. My business has commercial rate so any additional juice necessary can be done there.
And once you start charging on free energy then you will count how many smiles you have per mile. If you decide to go this route and you can actually install solar, make sure you do good research and learn about everything related to off grid living. There is a lot of hardware that can be purchased for not much money and will serve you for many decades to come.
You've got the equivalent of about twenty Powerwalls-worth of storage?
 

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That doesn't tell us a whole lot without the number of kWh delivered for that amount.
Admittedly we are a special case, with my wife and I both driving between 2,000 - 3,000 miles per month on a pair of EUVs. This has also been the hottest month of the year, with about a 2-week stretch of temperatures approaching or exceeding 110 degrees every day.

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You've got the equivalent of about twenty Powerwalls-worth of storage?
All my 250 kWh battery banks are made by CATL LFP chemistry battery cells, i do have total of 40 kw power output on good day and perfect angle when sun is at peak .
I did it all together with my Dad and this project took 7 years to get it completed.
I was not in rush, i was doing little every year.
Battery packs where last I did and it took 2 years to get it this big. Before i had 15 kWh storage for learning and playing before moving into most expensive part of building 250 kWh worth of storage. I have dropped from 4000+ kWh use to 500 kWh or less a month by using solar power. I could go completely off grid but my mom is still not following schedule when to charge EV or how to use off grid power supply.
 

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The explanation was that the cost of natural gas has doubled, and much of our power comes from gas generators.
In MN the cost of the fuel used to generate the power is passed thru directly (no markup afaik) to the customer bill. For 15+ years I've subscribed to our utility's wind power program and it has always cost more per kwh than the fuel would - until a few months ago when the fuel cost is more.

The bill shows the fuel cost charge, then the wind cost charge, then the fuel cost credited back:

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Since I do almost half my charging for free at work, I've bought 63 kWh so far to go 640 miles in my first week and a half of ownership. That yields 10.6 miles per purchased kWh. I have solar power and the utility buys my excess production at 3 cents per kWh. So, that comes to 63 kWh at $0.03/kWh or $1.89 to cover 640 miles. That's about 0.3 cents per mile so far. My Prius Prime was running about 1.5 to 2.5 cents per mile.

Percentage wise, this thing is saving a LOT. Dollar wise, not so much, but it sure is satisfying.
 

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So then this is not what you pay. The only real way of discussing how much we all pay is to take the total payment and divide it by how much you use. Dollars per kWh. Simple. Any strategies that are used to minimize this, such as off peak pricing, will be reflected in the total.
Here we go again, sendler attempting to confuse people on yet another forum because he can't personally understand the importance of differentiating between fixed and variable costs.

Might as well add in the cost of the mortgage and insurance and divide by that too, as you wouldn't get electrical service unless you had the house, and if you have a house you've got to have insurance. :rolleyes: Looks like I'm paying about $20 / kWh then :D My most recent months I've been billed for no electricity because my solar has overproduced. Guess I should take that $12 fixed cost and divide it by zero kWh :p Go ahead and put that into a calculator and get back to me on the result.

Don't know why informing people incorrectly is the hill to die on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Since I do almost half my charging for free at work, I've bought 63 kWh so far to go 640 miles in my first week and a half of ownership. That yields 10.6 miles per purchased kWh. I have solar power and the utility buys my excess production at 3 cents per kWh. So, that comes to 63 kWh at $0.03/kWh or $1.89 to cover 640 miles. That's about 0.3 cents per mile so far. My Prius Prime was running about 1.5 to 2.5 cents per mile.

Percentage wise, this thing is saving a LOT. Dollar wise, not so much, but it sure is satisfying.
Funny story. Back in 2017 when I was considering getting an electric I asked my company's building manager if they were going to put in EV chargers. He said yes, in the summer. As it turned out I bought the Volt (53 mile electric range) even though my commute was 74 miles round trip. I figured I could charge at work to have enough charge to get home. Anyhow, summer came and went and no chargers. I contacted the building manager again in the autumn and he said the chargers we too expensive so they weren't going to put them in. Luckily I got the Volt with the range extender. Anyhow, 3 years later I retired -- still no chargers. Then I went back for some consulting work 6 months after retiring and lo and behold, a bank of 8 chargers, free for employees. <sigh>
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
So then this is not what you pay. The only real way of discussing how much we all pay is to take the total payment and divide it by how much you use. Dollars per kWh. Simple. Any strategies that are used to minimize this, such as off peak pricing, will be reflected in the total.
The fixed cost was incurred before I bought the EV, so for comparison purposes I don't consider that a EV mileage cost.
 
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