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I will be more than happy to help anyone who is interested to do his own work and start journey to independence. Start small and keep expanding as your budget allows.
There is great prices on used solar panels for beginners and some of used solar panels can easily last for another 20 years. Biggest cost is sourcing battery cells to make power banks, inverters are not anymore expensive as they use to be.
Battery banks are last step anyway, until you figure out everything else and you are ready to store energy in future for consumption when there is no sun or not enough energy to power entire house from solar panels ( weather is sometimes against giving away free energy).
 

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I will be more than happy to help anyone who is interested to do his own work and start journey to independence. Start small and keep expanding as your budget allows.
There is great prices on used solar panels for beginners and some of used solar panels can easily last for another 20 years. Biggest cost is sourcing battery cells to make power banks, inverters are not anymore expensive as they use to be.
Battery banks are last step anyway, until you figure out everything else and you are ready to store energy in future for consumption when there is no sun or not enough energy to power entire house from solar panels ( weather is sometimes against giving away free energy).
You're talking not grid-tied though, right?

Seems it would be a nightmare to constantly seek approval with the utility to expand solar, then another round of inspections, etc.

I'm considering expanding my 6.4 kW (20 panels) system, but then it isn't so straightforward with a string inverter. I'd need to replace it. I've only got west facing roof let to add too, also.
 

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You're talking not grid-tied though, right?

Seems it would be a nightmare to constantly seek approval with the utility to expand solar, then another round of inspections, etc.

I'm considering expanding my 6.4 kW (20 panels) system, but then it isn't so straightforward with a string inverter. I'd need to replace it. I've only got west facing roof let to add too, also.
I would never sell my energy to the energy suppliers.... but if this is your cup of tea it will cost you arms and legs to comply with so many rules forced on you.
Regarding string inverters that is little complicated to make it off grid easily. But ripping them out and selling them will buy you more solar panels and use more traditional way. I do agree that string inverters do deliver better efficiency but if you have enough space couple more solar panels will improve numbers you are looking for.
I'm going off grid completely by 01/01/2023 and I will never look back. I will probably go with 15-20 kw solar panels more and increase my my battery banks to 500 kWh so my sister house next to me can enjoy it. Hopefully this part of project will be done by 2027, because I don't want to burn so much money quickly. It is possible to accomplish something i have but there is no need to go crazy and get it done quick. Take your time go slow and learn while you doing it yourself. As you become more experienced and have more knowledge about your project it will be much easier and when something goes wrong you will be one that can figure out problem with out spending thousands on someone else to fix.
HV AC is dangerous as HV DC battery banks but if you learn how to work around safely it will be like any other job. I have fried couple inverters myself because I was not reading instructions and going by what I knew already. Some money will be waisted on mistakes but eventually you will be very proud some day with everything you did yourself and becoming independent from energy supplier.
 

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My personal opinion if location allows should be requirement from government to become independent and have your own way to produce energy and provide energy to others in emergency disasters. All of this EV rebates should be invested on every household to become own energy producer and by doing it it will help big energy producers to focus on fast DC charging locations and provide unrestricted power to the EV charging networks. Out taxpayers money is waisted and manufacturers are using loopholes to inflate MSRP so they are the ones that benefit from EV rebates.
 

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I've been interested in going solar or micro-hydro since the 90s when it wasn't even legal to grid connect (guerilla solar) and got inspiration from HomePower magazine.

The problem for my location is how much excess sizing is required to get through winter. My weekly peak production in late spring is 14x more than minimum production at the end of December. It isn't a good use of resources for me to build 14x more capacity than I need in spring just to get me through winter.

Some locations don't vary so drastically, but there's no getting around the fact that a system must be built in such a way that it's almost always underutilized, sometimes by several multiples of need, and other times extremely close to being insufficient.

For that reason, and time constraints, I utilize the grid as my battery year-round. The utility isn't making any money off me with their $12 monthly meter charge. I represent a net liability to them.
 

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We have just signed a contract for installing a 6.4kw system on our roof. It is calculated to produce about 125% of our needs on an average. The excess will go to the grid since we didn't opt for battery. The batteries are still very expensive. Heck, i noticed that the panels are not too expensive, it's only about 25% of the entire cost to install. I really wish i could install them myself and save a ton of money, but getting permits, working with utility provider, and installing on the roof it on the roof is just too much.

I do agree though the these rebates are nothing but corporate welfare. I always wondered what the cost to install these panels would be if we didn't get rebates.
 

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So then this is not what you pay. The only real way of discussing how much we all pay is to take the total payment and divide it by how much you use. Dollars per kWh. Simple. Any strategies that are used to minimize this, such as off peak pricing, will be reflected in the total.
Not really. Theres how much I pay per kWh and then there are other fees. It’s kind of like saying your cost per gallon of gas includes the gas it takes to get you to the gas station, the wear on your tires, and half an hour worth of car insurance.

If the per kWh fees add up to, for instance, 12 cents… that’s what I pay for each kWh I use. The other fees, tiny as they are, do not change whether I charge my car or not. By your logic, if I use zero kWh, I am paying infinite dollars per kWh.
 

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Man that is hurting my eyes just looking at so many lines they use for calculations.
This is lightyears better than it used to be. Used to be this complicated but not this clear. Apparently someone got it in their head that a confusing bill will help the $.24 /kWh go down. It's also long, I just found this which is actually much better:

Product Rectangle Font Parallel Screenshot



The $0.1427 is actually about $.13 because of another rebate I'm getting for the smart charger. As worded it should bring it down to $.09 since the smart EVSE discount is $.05, I need to look into that, it just seems like such a chore.
 

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This is lightyears better than it used to be. Used to be this complicated but not this clear. Apparently someone got it in their head that a confusing bill will help the $.24 /kWh go down. It's also long, I just found this which is actually much better:

View attachment 47122


The $0.1427 is actually about $.13 because of another rebate I'm getting for the smart charger. As worded it should bring it down to $.09 since the smart EVSE discount is $.05, I need to look into that, it just seems like such a chore.
I'm not quite sure how big your residence is but you should look in inverter type compressor style air conditioning for house and if you have swimming pool try to get pump on solar.
I have 3200 square feet residence and once I moved to split air conditioning style with inverter variables compressor technology my energy usage went down 60+%. And i have absolute control over what is cooled or heated by motion sensors and efficiency is way higher than central unit with air flow lines. Biggest energy users are old technology air conditioning single or 2 speed compressor, inverter type variable speed compressor have been improved dramatically over the years and they are more lasting than old technology that is still pushed towards people for cooling or heating. And there are ways to harness your EVSE for other heavy users besides EV, if your kWh is cheaper over EVSE.
 

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I'm not quite sure how big your residence is but you should look in inverter type compressor style air conditioning for house and if you have swimming pool try to get pump on solar.
I have 3200 square feet residence and once I moved to split air conditioning style with inverter variables compressor technology my energy usage went down 60+%. And i have absolute control over what is cooled or heated by motion sensors and efficiency is way higher than central unit with air flow lines. Biggest energy users are old technology air conditioning single or 2 speed compressor, inverter type variable speed compressor have been improved dramatically over the years and they are more lasting than old technology that is still pushed towards people for cooling or heating. And there are ways to harness your EVSE for other heavy users besides EV, if your kWh is cheaper over EVSE.
It's complicated, I'm in an urban/suburban house with only 1400 square feet. The house was built in 1930s and needs a lot of work and currently run through the wall AC units. I'm planning to rip out an oil/steam radiator system and put in an HVAC system with heatpump run on electric. I can also get about 11kW of solar since I have a large detached garage roof. I just within the past few weeks made the decision to stay here long term. I think now I'm going to save up like $100k and do everything all at once, potentially even more since I want to push up on the house and it obviously makes sense to do that before you put in solar.

Just getting to a point where starting one thing leads to another so I'm like, "screw it, save it and do it at once."
 

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My electricity is up to $0.19/ kWh all in at the bottom of my bill in Syracuse, NY. Up from $0.13 a couple years ago.
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View attachment 47075
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I also live in the area.
Have you read much about their TOU plan? My brief review suggested that savings were minimal at best, and using the ac at the house during the day might cost a fair bit more, actually raising the bill.
 

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It's complicated, I'm in an urban/suburban house with only 1400 square feet. The house was built in 1930s and needs a lot of work and currently run through the wall AC units. I'm planning to rip out an oil/steam radiator system and put in an HVAC system with heatpump run on electric. I can also get about 11kW of solar since I have a large detached garage roof. I just within the past few weeks made the decision to stay here long term. I think now I'm going to save up like $100k and do everything all at once, potentially even more since I want to push up on the house and it obviously makes sense to do that before you put in solar.

Just getting to a point where starting one thing leads to another so I'm like, "screw it, save it and do it at once."
I would suggest ground setup for solar vs roof. If you have room. Cleaning leafs under solar panels on the roof are no fun, and when time comes for roof repair or replacement it is double work. I have learned my lesson having roof solar panels.
Another suggestion regarding your residence, i would really focus on insulation and good quality windows and doors, take time don't rush, as you progress slowly you will find a lot of ways to save money and change from actual design you had at the beginning of construction. Believe me on this this is not my first rodeo working on old houses. Take your time before start burning a lot of cash at once.
And here is my first attempt trying to make house all by myself in the woods far away from civilization
Plant Building Sky Window Natural landscape
Plant Building Sky Window Natural landscape

And I have never worked in my life on house before, but plenty of patience and a lot of YouTube videos.
 

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This is lightyears better than it used to be. Used to be this complicated but not this clear. Apparently someone got it in their head that a confusing bill will help the $.24 /kWh go down...
Tangent thought inspired by my misunderstanding of your graphic...

What if utilities gave an allowance during peak times to every household, where the first x amount of consumption is billed at the base rate, with amounts over that being billed a very high peak rate? In fact, just take baseload and divide it evenly among all households to determine the allowance given. This would tend to allow less wealthy households to use some minimal amount of electricity during that time without incurring a large electric bill, while the big mansions with swimming pools would end up with a bigger bill. The wealthy households could choose to consume less during peak events, but if they are wealthy enough to not bother, might as well have them pay.

In other words, take peak pricing and apply it more heavily to peak users. Double-peak pricing. It reduces financial burden on those least contributing to the high electrical demand and provides relief to lower income families.
 

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You're talking not grid-tied though, right?

Seems it would be a nightmare to constantly seek approval with the utility to expand solar, then another round of inspections, etc.

I'm considering expanding my 6.4 kW (20 panels) system, but then it isn't so straightforward with a string inverter. I'd need to replace it. I've only got west facing roof let to add too, also.
Most solar companies won't expand existing systems. They'll just install a new one, alongside the existing one.
 

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Most solar companies won't expand existing systems. They'll just install a new one, alongside the existing one.
I spoke to the electrician from my company when he was out to repair the squirrel damaged wire. My 20 panel (320w ea) system is utilizing both of the inverter inputs. He said if I expanded, I'd have to buy a higher power inverter with 3 inputs, which is the 10kw unit (currently have 6kw), and I'd have to tap into the mains instead of simply go through a breaker.

Would be neat to flatten my production curve as sun shifts from south to west by having panels on both sides. No tree obstructions to contend with on the west side, too.

Kicking myself for a. not going with string inverters to begin with, and b. not going for a larger system to begin with. I planned for the minimum size that would exhaust 2 of the 3 subsidies. Going larger then would have only seen the federal tax credit.

Maybe I'll just invent a misting system to clean and keep the panels cool to boost efficiency.
 

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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
Hello, a + is we reduce the pollution. I wonder if you can get in you state a electricity reduction for the EV?

good luck
 

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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
I live in NJ, where we have Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L), which is part of GPU. I don't look at the separate energy and delivery costs, that would be like looking at what part of a gallon is the fuel and what is the tax. Might be interesting, but you just pay the total. From what I had believed prior to what you wrote, Long Island (LIPA), NYC (ConEd), and NJ had some of the highest costs in the country... Yours appear to be way higher. When I divide my bill TOTAL including taxes by the number of kwh, I get $0.162. I know that the Northwest, because of hydro power, used to be less than a third what we pay. No idea if that is still true. BTW, you are assuming perfect efficiency in charging, and if you leave the car plugged in, you are not accounting for conditioning (cooling in the summer and heating in the winter) to keep the battery in the sweet spot for power. Using your numbers I would come out to about $0.04 per mile. I would round up to $0.05 for conditioning and efficiency. Still good numbers. I think you electricity consumption is higher by a tad than you estimate, but also remember that gasoline consumption goes up in winter due to warm-up (most important for short trips). Renewable energy is now lower cost than coal, and faster to build than any other generation source, so let's hope that energy costs stabilize and locally produced renewables bring costs down
 

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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
no, I pay 15 cents @1000kw/month in Ohiop. if use 2000kw/month I pay less than 15 cents /kW. caveat: there is a factor greater than 1 you must use. Because your Bolt reading is kw in and not from your house or source.
 

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Time to invest on solar panels, you don't have to go all out. Start small and keep expanding as you see there is money to be spent.
In my state Oct-May kWh is 0.0547 and additional taxes and other fees.
May-October 0.0764 kWh.
And we are already thinking about completely going off grid because our solar power and 250 kWh battery storage is making enough energy for house and powering EVS when necessary. My business has commercial rate so any additional juice necessary can be done there.
And once you start charging on free energy then you will count how many smiles you have per mile. If you decide to go this route and you can actually install solar, make sure you do good research and learn about everything related to off grid living. There is a lot of hardware that can be purchased for not much money and will serve you for many decades to come.
I agree. We have solar panels, which helps a lot! We live in MA, where electricity is also ver expensive. The solar panels have made a huge difference.
 
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