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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
I'm also in NH. Eversource announced this rate hike months in advance and had to get PUC approval for it. I'm surprised it was approved, as a 50% increase to many people's bills is going to be a serious hardship, especially rolling into winter. We do have the ability to change energy providers though. I switched to Direct Energy back in August, and locked in $0.135 for 28 months. Their plans went up as well since then, but you can still shave a few pennies off compared to Eversource. Note that you still have the same delivery fees, this is just a change in the energy supplier charge. I don't know if their referral is still working, as their website seems kind of broken in multiple ways today, but here's my link if you want to try: Refer-a-Friend | Direct Energy

Here's my most recent bill. I got absolutely wrecked in August due to a perfect storm of high AC use, a temporary electric water heater, and the new Eversource rates kicking in. My switch to DE didn't go into effect until September.

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I’m sure I sound negative here, but I don’t see it going any other way than electricity costs going up and up. When there’s a need and a demand, and a way to make more money, systems find a way to squeeze it out of you. More EVs on the road equals more demand on the system, more outages and repairs, more infrastructure needed, and more staffing, more more more, which justifies more expenses from the electric companies and a demand for more revenue from the consumer. And while some of those things are legitimate, there’s an opportunity there to fluff. Bottom line is that whether non-for profit, cooperatives or otherwise, these are systems and systems want to grow and prosper. There are known savings happening from using EVs and therefore dollars that can be grabbed where most people will still be saying, like they’re already saying with this thread, “Well, at least I’m still saving some money from what I was or would be paying “, while that savings disparity gets whittled away. So the boundaries can be pushed and they will push them. It sucks but it’s the way of the world and this kind of stuff goes unchecked, aside from being talked about in unfulfilled campaign promises. That all said, I’m going to continue to enjoy the savings for as long as they last and there are other benefits to my EV that I love, so I’m looking for another one now.
 

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I'm also in NH. Eversource announced this rate hike months in advance and had to get PUC approval for it. I'm surprised it was approved, as a 50% increase to many people's bills is going to be a serious hardship, especially rolling into winter. We do have the ability to change energy providers though. I switched to Direct Energy back in August, and locked in $0.135 for 28 months. Their plans went up as well since then, but you can still shave a few pennies off compared to Eversource. Note that you still have the same delivery fees, this is just a change in the energy supplier charge. I don't know if their referral is still working, as their website seems kind of broken in multiple ways today, but here's my link if you want to try: Refer-a-Friend | Direct Energy

Here's my most recent bill. I got absolutely wrecked in August due to a perfect storm of high AC use, a temporary electric water heater, and the new Eversource rates kicking in. My switch to DE didn't go into effect until September.

View attachment 47235
I actually switched to Direct Energy a few days ago. I was only able to save 2.5 cents per kwh. My locked in rate for 26 months is $0.209 per kwh for supply, which makes my delivered rate $0.29/kwh, which is still crazy high. I am now looking at solar.
 

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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
you should enroll in Resident power - it is like a coop and uses large scale purchasing to keep rates low
 

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I actually switched to Direct Energy a few days ago. I was only able to save 2.5 cents per kwh. My locked in rate for 26 months is $0.209 per kwh for supply, which makes my delivered rate $0.29/kwh, which is still crazy high. I am now looking at solar.
Good idea, 2.5¢ will still add up over those months. I'm also going to be looking into solar for next year, especially with the new renewble energy incentives coming into play. I designed and installed a 4.81kW system (the state rebate rules limited me to 5kW or less) at my last home which paid for itself in under 5 years. My new house isn't as ideally situated, but I think I can still make it work. I'll be doing a lot of number crunching over the winter to see if it makes sense to put in a new one even with my site limitations.
 

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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
When I talk about how much I pay per kWh, I mean how much they charge per kWh. Not the fees that are static. There is the base electrical rate, then about 5 or 6 other fees and taxes that are based on usage. All of those dynamic fees added up are what I consider to be my kWh rate.
I’ve a residential rooftop solar system which nets to $0.09/kWh. I hear and cool with heat pump, charge and operate two Bolts totaling 5K miles per year. My annual utility cost is $540, which is less than the insurance in an ICE.
 

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Hawaii is highest. Vermont tries to compete among the highest rates. California turns folks power off and bills them for the trouble.

Curious why your bill doubled, and how it was "explained" to you as a great thing.

Electric Rates by State | Payless Power
I'm also in NH. It was never explained as a good thing, but the explanation given was that natural gas has gone way up. They did reduce the delivery charge slightly.

I do have solar panels. At least the price they pay me when I generate enough to send back to the grid also went up.
 

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The interesting side benefit of solar to me is that I can see all the power coming and going through the main service panel. After time and paying attention I can tell what device is running my house and how long it is running and how much it is using. Just this year I'm starting to learn how much my electric hot water heater is benefiting me from the device on my geothermal heat pump that preheats a separate hot water tank that feeds my actual hot water heater. The dummy hot water heater is preheated from excess energy from the geothermal when in use. During the summer I noticed my actual hot water heater running more than when the geothermal was preheating it. Now I will figure out how much.
Last August 2021 I updated my geothermal from a older model that was in the house when I bought it which didn't have this feature. The old model was about 30 years old and still running.
 

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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
Another precinct heard from: Here in Northern California, we have Time of Use rates (TOU) with PG&E (which also offers free "heat" in the form of cozy forest fires, and free romantic sunsets courtesy of the smoke the fires generate!). Peak rates are $0.39/kwh; Partial Peak is $0.37, and Off Peak is $0.21 (as of February). We installed solar, and are on their Net Metering program. Now we get bills that are over ten pages long and provide no pertinent information about rates! What a great deal!

But wait! There's more! PG&E credits us for the power we provide them at a rate that is a fraction of what they charge us when the current runs the other way. They also restrict how much power we can generate (through regulating how many panels we were allowed to install) with a required contract, AND now they want to charge people who go completely off grid! (Just think about that for a minute! Exxon, listen up: Why not charge EV users for not buying your fossil fuels!) But the best thing is that the money they saved by not maintaining clearance around their transmission lines went to their then-CEO, which must be a great comfort to the folks who are still waiting to be compensated for the loss of their homes, neighborhoods, and loved ones.

That's the great thing about running a monopoly. It's not as if we and our houses can pick up and stroll to another state to shop for better rates. A li'l lobbying goes a long way in California.
 

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I pay about $0.255/kWh in Connecticut. Not quite as high as you, but also not fun. It's kind of wild how extreme the variations are in electrict I think they go up a bit in the winter rates across the country.
Summer electricity rates in Seattle are about .125 kwh including all fees. There is no off peak rate but they may go up in the winter. We have hydroelectric and we own the utility. Our gasoline prices are some of the highest in the country. Costco is 3.99 Highest price is 5.69.
 

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I’m sure I sound negative here, but I don’t see it going any other way than electricity costs going up and up. When there’s a need and a demand, and a way to make more money, systems find a way to squeeze it out of you. More EVs on the road equals more demand on the system, more outages and repairs, more infrastructure needed, and more staffing, more more more, which justifies more expenses from the electric companies and a demand for more revenue from the consumer...
That's generally not true of commodities like electricity. The greater the use, the cheaper it gets. US electricity consumption rose steeply all the way until about 2005, when efficiency began to create a plateau in demand.



As demand massively expanded, prices trended downward


Bad policy and mismanagement conspire to increase electricity prices, not the fact that demand might increase. Increasing demand is not a causal factor of long-term price increases.
 

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Those of us up here in the frozen-ass-end-of-nowhere have relatively low line costs, (10.5 cents per kilowatt hour) which is a good thing, because our house doesn't get enough sun to pay back solar. For the next eight months, October through May, the sun is seldom seen.

jack vines
 

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So here in NH our electricity cost just more than doubled last month. That means we now pay $0.313 per kwh for our electricity ($0.226/kwh is the electricity cost and $0.09/kwh is the delivery cost). So, if I drive 1000 miles per month and I get 4 miles per kwh, it will cost me $78 in charging costs for home charging, or about $0.078 per mile driven. Our ICE SUV gets 30 mpg, which translates to $0.116 per mile driven if gas costs $3.49/gallon. In other words, even at these grossly high electricity prices the EV is still about 33% cheaper than ICE per mile. And this ignores maintenance costs, which are much higher for the ICE. But once winter sets in I expect the efficiency to drop to 3 miles per kwh, or perhaps even lower. That would raise my electricity cost per mile to $0.104, or almost parity with burning gas in my ICE.

Does anybody out there have higher electric rates than we "enjoy" here in New Hampshire?
Oh, I’m so sorry for you. Your monthly bills must be a killer. In Las Vegas I get a special rate because of my EV. It costs me next to nothing to charge. Sorry to rub this in but I pay $0.06 per Kwh during peak times and $0.05 during overnight charging time. But, New Hampshire is more beautiful, unless you like the desert.
 

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In Colorado, my electric co-op just raised their per kWh price from 11 cents to 11.7 cents. They also raised their peak demand rate (during 4-8 pm) from $1.50/ kW to $2.00/ kW. They also raised their grid connection rate to $13.50 / month.

Since I don't charge during peak hours, the peak demand and grid connection charges are the same as they would be if I didn't have an EV.

However, I have 40 solar panels putting out a peak AC power of 9.8 kW. I have net metering so any kWh I supply to the grid is subtracted from any kWh I pull from the grid. Over the course of the year, even with charging the EV most of the time at home, I produce about 2 MWh more energy than I use. The co-op then reimburses me the going wholesale rate (last time it was 4.8 cents/kWh) for the excess. So, any energy I use to charge the Bolt just reduces the rebate I get each year by 4.8 cents/ kWh. I'm getting easily 4.5 - 5.0 mi/kWh during fair weather for local travel. Winter is more like 3.9 - 4.1 mi/kWh as long as I'm not carrying bikes externally or driving up into the mountains. My last long-distance trip to Wyoming I was getting 4.1 miles/kWh. My last trip to the East Coast and back I got 3.8 mi/kWh (Due to high speeds and lots of A/C.)

Let's say 4.0 mi/kWh in general. That means that it costs me 1.2 cents/mi for home charging. My East Coast trip (3711 miles costing $217 in DC fast charging) comes out to 5.85 cents/mile. Last gas price I saw was $3.69/gallon at the best local place. My wife's ICE got only 17.8 miles/gallon on the Wyoming trip. That works out to 20.73 cents/mi.
 

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I live in SE Ohio and our supplier is South Central. Last month's rate was $.113026 KWh. We also pay a $19.00 per month consumer charge. I have an 8.8KW solar system with a 7.6kw inverter grid tied. 22 400 watt panel on a ground mount. Since the system was installed July of last year I've paid about $147.00 in total and presently have a $146.16 credit. I get reimbursed 7.7cent per KWh for excess. I only charge my Bolt between 10am-4pm. I have six more 400 watt panels to install on a separate adjustable ground mount. I drive about 1000 miles per month in the Bolt. I have mini splits for AC/ backup heating. I have my own low pressure gas well but it doesn't have enough volume for the the furnance so I have propane. The gas well does have enough pressure for the hot water heater, dryer, and range. I do feel fortunate that I get gas royalties from a deep well about a 1/2 mile from my property.
 

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Hawaii is highest. Vermont tries to compete among the highest rates. California turns folks power off and bills them for the trouble.

Curious why your bill doubled, and how it was "explained" to you as a great thing.

Electric Rates by State | Payless Power
well it could be worse, you could be in Texas, and if it got colder than normal (though not much worse than any other year in the last 15 years), you could have your power turned off several times a day (at least once every 3-4 hours.,.if not mre often), and if you were really unlucky and bought electricity from the wrong company, your bill for the month, could be almost $10000, though were semi nice about and let you pay it over a few decades or more. course they also spread out the bill so not just you paid for it, you and everyone else did. course Texas and Oklahoma both have gas, but the rates arent exactly the same are they? deregulation in Texas (oh and California) have been major disasters.
 
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