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Hi everyone,
I am getting a bolt ordered later this week. I have an electrician coming to my house today to get an estimate for installing a 240volt line installed in garage. My question to everyone is: If I get the juice box 40amp, Can I charge either the bolt or the Tesla, or do I need to purchase a second charger for her Tesla?
Also, since I have your ears, I am planning on ordering a premier with driver safety pkg, and infotainment pkg, and dc charging capabilities. Are there any other options I should get?
 

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Telsas come with a little adapter that you put on a J1772 plug (the standard plug type for EVs) and it converts it to the Tesla standard. Juice box will work for both, it just wont max out the Tesla charge rate.
 

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FWIW- the Bolt maxes out at 32amps on L2, so the 40amp JB is perfect for the Bolt.


Accessories....
I bought the full "all weather heavy duty" OEM mat set including the rear cargo area... excellent quality. Got it online vs. ordering at the dealership.

Ordered a custom front windshield shade at autogeek.

Picked up a two cylinder inflation pump at Costco for $25. Yes, the tires are self sealing, but if they leak out some air before sealing... it would be nice to have a pump onboard for that. I also keep a tire plug kit ($10 @ Walmart) onboard to plug any leak the self seal goo won't fix.
 

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How can your daughter get a Model 3? It isn't in production until the end of this year!

Get her a Chevy Bolt EV or a Chevy Volt instead. Both can be purchased now. And if you wish to save, get a used Volt.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

It should be fine, looked up the Juice Box and it says it's compliant with the Tesla Model S, Tesla Model X, Tesla Model 3, Chevy Bolt. At least this one I found is: https://emotorwerks.com/store-juicebox-ev-charging-stations/202-juicebox-pro-40-smart-40-amp-evse-with-24-foot-cable/category_pathway-23
I have a EMW Level 2 Juicebox EVSE that I assembled from a kit in 2014 (it is in my signature). It is rated at 16 kW (80 A) so it can feed any present and future EV. When I installed it I set it up for 30 A or 7.2 kW because it is on a 40 A circuit, but I can replace that breaker and wiring for higher currents. And by coincidence, GM made the Chevy Bolt EV with a 7.2 kW charger, so they met my exact specs!;)

I posted pictures and a description of it at "gm-volt.com".

Edit: EMW sells DC chargers up to 25 kW for BEVs, and sell the CHAdeMO interface for the Nissan Leaf. I wrote and asked them about the SAE DCFC (CCS) interface and EMW responded that they are working on it. So to every Bolt EV owner who wish to charge DC at home, do follow up with EMW on the status of that interface. If you plan to add a second Bolt EV or another BEV that uses CCS, this is a valid option.
 

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Telsas come with a little adapter that you put on a J1772 plug (the standard plug type for EVs) and it converts it to the Tesla standard. Juice box will work for both, it just wont max out the Tesla charge rate.
Well, in all fairness, nobody knows what the Model 3's charge rate will be yet. My advice would be to buy a charger big enough to max out a Model S and you'll likely be fine for both the Model 3, or the Bolt and have some future proofing.
 

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Well, in all fairness, nobody knows what the Model 3's charge rate will be yet. My advice would be to buy a charger big enough to max out a Model S and you'll likely be fine for both the Model 3, or the Bolt and have some future proofing.
Good point. We don't know the L2 charge rate yet. If you buy a higher powered charger make sure that your incoming service can handle it too. A 80A station isn't an option for my 100A incoming main service. Upgrading the service would be a significant cost.
 

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In spending the money to run the cable and hook up the charger in your garage, I would recommend you put in the highest current carrying cable that your system will support. Why pay twice? Then if you are purchasing a charger buy the one that is the highest amperage given the cable and circuit. That way you are future proof. You can acquire a 75 amp unit that will work with the Tesla as well as the Bolt. I think the challenge is to figure out how to switch out the car and still get your charging done during the off peak hours. I have two cars, a Kia Soul EV plus the Bolt. If both need charging it is a problem. I really don't want to get up in the morning to switch cars. I had considered running the largest cable and then having two receptacles in the garage. I could then have two chargers plugged in. If I could control when each charger would start then it would not make a difference that both exceed the cables and circuit capability. I did not go this route because we rarely use both cars to a point where they have to be charged. I should mention that I have solar panels and that is why I am on TOU Time of Use with SCE. I generate during the day and get credit that results in my charging the car almost for free. The rate that is charged super off peak is around $0.13/kwh versus getting a credit for around $0.35 during the day when I am generating electricity. Kind of cool. I ran my own cable from the electric panel to the garage. I used a cable that was 6 gauge and a 50 amp circuit breaker. That was about the largest cable I could feed through the panel conduit that leads from the panel through the wall. In retrospect I probably could have used 8 gauge with double conductors and ended up with greater capacity but less volume. That is what Tony and his company use to end up with easily handled cable for their JESLA (I believe I am correct?) I could have perhaps run as much as 80 amps from my panel which is a 200 amp panel.
 

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In spending the money to run the cable and hook up the charger in your garage, I would recommend you put in the highest current carrying cable that your system will support. Why pay twice? Then if you are purchasing a charger buy the one that is the highest amperage given the cable and circuit. That way you are future proof. You can acquire a 75 amp unit that will work with the Tesla as well as the Bolt. I think the challenge is to figure out how to switch out the car and still get your charging done during the off peak hours. I have two cars, a Kia Soul EV plus the Bolt. If both need charging it is a problem. I really don't want to get up in the morning to switch cars. I had considered running the largest cable and then having two receptacles in the garage. I could then have two chargers plugged in. If I could control when each charger would start then it would not make a difference that both exceed the cables and circuit capability. I did not go this route because we rarely use both cars to a point where they have to be charged. I should mention that I have solar panels and that is why I am on TOU Time of Use with SCE. I generate during the day and get credit that results in my charging the car almost for free. The rate that is charged super off peak is around $0.13/kwh versus getting a credit for around $0.35 during the day when I am generating electricity. Kind of cool. I ran my own cable from the electric panel to the garage. I used a cable that was 6 gauge and a 50 amp circuit breaker. That was about the largest cable I could feed through the panel conduit that leads from the panel through the wall. In retrospect I probably could have used 8 gauge with double conductors and ended up with greater capacity but less volume. That is what Tony and his company use to end up with easily handled cable for their JESLA (I believe I am correct?) I could have perhaps run as much as 80 amps from my panel which is a 200 amp panel.
I have found a few EVSE that you can plug two vehicles in and it charges them at the same time (half the stations capacity each). When one finishes, it maxes out the other. I don't think they are very cheap though. Here is an example:
http://insideevs.com/clippercreek-power-sharing-product-lets-you-turn-one-charging-station-into-two/
 

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In spending the money to run the cable and hook up the charger in your garage, I would recommend you put in the highest current carrying cable that your system will support. Why pay twice? Then if you are purchasing a charger buy the one that is the highest amperage given the cable and circuit. That way you are future proof. You can acquire a 75 amp unit that will work with the Tesla as well as the Bolt. I think the challenge is to figure out how to switch out the car and still get your charging done during the off peak hours. I have two cars, a Kia Soul EV plus the Bolt. If both need charging it is a problem. I really don't want to get up in the morning to switch cars. I had considered running the largest cable and then having two receptacles in the garage. I could then have two chargers plugged in. If I could control when each charger would start then it would not make a difference that both exceed the cables and circuit capability. I did not go this route because we rarely use both cars to a point where they have to be charged. I should mention that I have solar panels and that is why I am on TOU Time of Use with SCE. I generate during the day and get credit that results in my charging the car almost for free. The rate that is charged super off peak is around $0.13/kwh versus getting a credit for around $0.35 during the day when I am generating electricity. Kind of cool. I ran my own cable from the electric panel to the garage. I used a cable that was 6 gauge and a 50 amp circuit breaker. That was about the largest cable I could feed through the panel conduit that leads from the panel through the wall. In retrospect I probably could have used 8 gauge with double conductors and ended up with greater capacity but less volume. That is what Tony and his company use to end up with easily handled cable for their JESLA (I believe I am correct?) I could have perhaps run as much as 80 amps from my panel which is a 200 amp panel.
First off - the charger is part of the car (for L1 & L2 AC charging).

And running the largest possible cable may be an unnecessary expense for many. Using Tesla's calculator for a Model S - if you drive 200 miles a day (few do), the charge time for a 32A EVSE (40A circuit) is ~ 7 hours. Charging from a 48 A EVSE (60A circuit) drops that to a little less than 6 hours. At 100 miles/day, you would save a bit more than 1/2 an hour in charge time.

For most people, a 32A EVSE is overkill for charging at night.

Charging 2 EV's during off peak is challenging. But it is far safer (and meets code) to run standard equipment on separate circuits (this could be done with a sub-panel near the EVSE's).

There are some EVSE's that are designed to communicate and share a single circuit. The JuiceBox Pro does that @ $599 and it is a 10 kW (40A) EVSE. Clipper Creek sells a pair of 32A EVSE that share for $1,498.

From an economic standpoint, it may be cheaper to charge one of the EV's at a time when electricity is a bit higher. Mid peak? Spending $600+ for a second EVSE could take a long time to recover as compared to the difference in electricity cost.
 

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I currently have a Model S and a Bolt. I have two chargers, a Tesla wall charger and a Juice Box I assembled in 2014. I use pig tails for both and they are connected to two 14-50 outlets. Run a sub panel to the garage and run you feeder lines from the sub panel to the chargers, that way you plug them both in and they both charge, no need to swap chargers
 
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