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Was curious if the high voltage charging offered by the DC Fast charge option had any effect on the longevity of the battery.

Data available?
 

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Yes - but how much depends on a bunch of different factors (including the exact composition of the battery - which varies from manufacturer to manufacturer).

It is too early to tell for the Bolt.
 

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Yep, just too early to tell with Bolts. BUT, there was a study done on fast charging and degradation with 2012 Nissan Leafs.
http://www.autoblog.com/2014/03/17/dc-fast-charging-not-as-damaging-to-ev-batteries-as-expected/

4 2012 Leafs tested, 2 exclusively fast charged @ 50 kW, 2 charged only on 3.3 kW L2
After 50,000 miles of driving and charging, the Idaho lab found the fast charged Leafs only had 2.6% more degradation than the "slow" charged Leafs. Basically, almost a negligible difference.

Now that was with early Leafs with inferior battery tech and NO active TMS of any kind. The Bolt has the latest and greatest battery from LG Chem, and also has active TMS. Combined with GM's seemingly conservative fast charging approach (charge rate taper at ~50% and 70%) and I think degradation from fast charging will be a non-issue. :)
 

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No I haven't heard anything specifically about the Bolt but it pretty well documented on the Tesla's and the Leaf. The thing, is other than improving range, battery longevity and fast charging is probably the most researched subject. Between the latest cell chemistries and the most advanced charging protocols projected useful battery longevity has been push well over ten years. DCFC will degrade battery capacity quicker has been shown but DCFC should only be used as an occasional charging option and not as your standard power source. Regular charging should be done at level 2 for the best balance of quickness and battery longevity.

The Bolt has the latest most up to date battery chemistries and design. I'm sure it will also have the most robust battery currently on the market for fast charging. That said, personally I would only fast charge occasionally and use level 2 charging to further protect my battery's longevity.
 

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to my knowledge there is no detrimental effect using DC Fast charging technologies - at least no major effect that will manifest itself in the typical 7-10 year life of the car - and even if there is replacement batteries will probably offer higher capacity and lower costs - on order of cost similar to any major car repair for a long time use vehicle. The Tesla forums and studies have shown no major loss of range or capacity - what is a problem is constantly charing to 100% rather than a more reasonable 90% and limiting use of constantly topping off one's battery to only when you'll need the extra 10% of range for long distance driving...

don't fear the DC charger it's your friend - but like all things moderation is key.
 

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I thought the Bolt has the option to limit charging to 90%? Or does that not apply to fast chargers?
Most of the time I won't even be able to find one, let alone use one enough to cause battery degradation so it's really a non issue.
 

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The "hill top reserve" feature is the Bolt's limit my charge to 90% setting. Although in my observed usage it varies from 89-92% when checking the SOC from the myChevy app.
 

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Charging a Bolt in Brooklyn, NY

I live in Brooklyn, NY and park my car in the street.

I'm considering buying a Chevy Bolt.

In NYC it is possible to rent a monthly parking space with a level-2 charger, but the cost of private parking here is astronomical.

There are a number of nearby parking lots connected to retail stores (Whole Foods, Walgreens) that have both level 2 and DC charging ports.

I'm not sure if I can leave my car in a Whole Foods parking lot for 10 hours, but I know I can leave it for 30 minutes while I shop.

From what I'm reading above it sounds as if I could exclusively use DC charging and not worry too much about battery degradation.

95% of my driving is here in the city and the rest is road trips to places like Philadelphia and Washington.

I have never owned an electric vehicle but I would love to drive around the city in clean, quiet Bolt.

I'm curious if anyone has insights about owning an EV in a city setting.
 

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City life with Bolt

Driving an EV in the city is its’ most efficient place. As long as traffic is moving most of the time, the efficiency can be huge! If a good miles/kWh number is 4, which is average used for 238 mile range number that Bolt gets, you could see 5 to 8 mi/kWh when city driving, which would reveal itself in an overall range easily in excess of 300 miles. A full charge could last weeks depending on how little you really drive. Using the heater in winter will take away nearly half of the available range if you use it a lot and don’t drive very far on each trip. Using regenerative braking in a city environment saves a bunch of energy. No emissions. If you can locate a place to charge it occasionally, a Bolt in the city makes a lot of sense!
 

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Thanks Catster.

I currently drive a gas-guzzling behemoth Dodge Grand Caravan. While it gets fairly decent mileage on the highway (up to 28 MPG) in NYC city driving my average is slightly below 14 MPG.

I drive about 6,000 miles a year; most of the mileage is from the occasional road trip, although most of the driving is running errands here in NYC.

In my Grand Caravan my city driving range is about 220 miles.

With the amount of driving I do I fill up my current car once every two weeks, sometimes less frequently.

The Bolt would really be ideal for me although I worry about parking etiquette in the lots where there are EV charging stations.

Do ICE vehicles routinely park in these spots, thus making them unusable for EV charging?
 

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my question would be, why own a car at all in brooklyn? public transit actually works. also NY winters are cold, and that's gonna affect your range. i think i read somewhere that it affects DCFC speed as well.
 

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Public transportation in Brooklyn is truthfully pretty uneven.

In downtown Brooklyn and most of "inner" Brooklyn, subway and bus coverage is outstanding.

But as soon as you go beyond this zone, there is no subway and the buses are infrequent and slow.

Some neighborhoods of "outer" Brooklyn barely have any bus service and the only public transportation there consists of "gypsy" buses known as dollar vans.

I live in an area of Brooklyn with tremendous subway access but I often find myself going to neighborhoods of Brooklyn where there is barely any bus service, hence the need for a car.

Yes, winters are cold but my average weekly mileage is barely about 100 miles, so I should be able to deal with reduced range.
 
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