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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This evening I took the Bolt to the local Nugget Market, which has 2 of the CCS/SAE fast chargers, as a test as I had never used the DC fast charging before. One of the charging lots was open, and it took a bit of time to figure out what the GreenLots terminal and app needed to get going. But once I got it figured out and pressed the 'Start' button, the screen shows 386 VDC, and 64 A.

I let it charge for 18 minutes, and I consumed 6.3 kwh, for $1.45, plus 11 cents 'tax and fee' and another 35 cents 'transaction fee', which I guess was for the first time use of the listed credit card.
 

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Out of curiosity, do you know if the fee is assessed per minute, or per kwh? It sounds like you were either mostly charged to begin, or in a cold environment. If you're getting charged by the minute and can wait 'til you're below 50% full - might be worth it.

The first time I plugged into a Level 3 charger I was disappointed not to see [email protected] But I had ¾ of a tank already. I have since let the battery get below 50% and then get the full rate - or close enough.

With the amount of noise the fan makes, it must be pretty big. I should take my IR camera out and snap a pic at the start and finish of a charge session. I guess they don't have any dynamic thermal management systems - or in the summer it's gonna sound like a C-5 Galaxy at takeoff if they do...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did take photos of the display before and after.

Before: 81%, 386 VDC, 64 A.
After: 90%, 394 VDC, 43 A.

The temperature was mild here in California.

While the email I had received back said I had been charged for 6.3 kwh, which I calculated to be 10.5% of the battery, and since the charge took 18 minutes, a full recharge of a depleted battery would take about 180 minutes, or 3 hours, but the service restricts users to 1 hour.
 

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Before: 81%, 386 VDC, 64 A.
Using a DC fast charger at 80% or above is a waste of time, and money. As you found, you averaged a 21 kW charge rate. At 30% and below, it starts to make sense. If we ever get ubiquitous DC fast charging, nobody is going to both until they are almost empty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Using a DC fast charger at 80% or above is a waste of time, and money. As you found, you averaged a 21 kW charge rate. At 30% and below, it starts to make sense. If we ever get ubiquitous DC fast charging, nobody is going to both until they are almost empty.
For me, it was worth the buck and a half to do a test run to learn how to use the terminal, and I did shopping at Nugget so it was neither a waste of time nor money.
 

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For me, it was worth the buck and a half to do a test run to learn how to use the terminal, and I did shopping at Nugget so it was neither a waste of time nor money.
Absolutely. We checked out two of the local DC fast chargers before venturing out on our one long trip, so far. The first one was "free" with a one hour parking limit, at a public parking lot. We did have to pay $3 for the one hour of parking. The other was an actual free hour in a hotel parking lot, while we ate at an Asian restaurant. Both times we were below 50% SOC, and saw 48 kW at the start.

On the actual trip, we used DC fast chargers six times in 1012 miles. We only had to pay at the EVgo unit, more than the cost of gas, but well worth it at this stage of the game.
 

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I'm lucky enough to have a free DCFC near enough to my office that I can walk to it and being new to EV's I have experimented with it.
In particular, I learned about reduced charging rates at high states of charge, and "proximity error" - it now has a new handle.
 
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