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Discussion Starter #1
New to the forum. I just lost my dear little city car, 2012 Mitsubishi iMiev, about a month ago to a car accident. So, with the small amount of insurance money I have from that, I was looking to upgrade my little car.
I am a drummer, so my little car worked just fine for gigs in town.... However, after that, I needed to take our truck. Looks like with the rear seats folded down, the Bolt would have a touch more room - and obviously more range. I thought it may be good to get online and speak with some owners about their experiences. I've hauled nearly 700 lbs of landscape block in my little iMiev, loads of lumber, even a 2" receiver on the back and would move trailers around (very light ones) and loads of bicycles.
Does anyone find that much utility in their Bolt?
Also, what are people seeing for battery life and management? Is the Quick DC charging too slow for folks? I'd love to know.
thank you!!
 

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Hello and welcome. I would make sure you get the CCS quick charging option and think seriously about what options you want but as long as the Bolt can take the weight mentioned you should be A-OK and 700 pounds is 3 average sized Americans so you should be OK. The bolt was recently rated #1 in how slow batter degradation occurs and right now you can get a smoking deal on a new Bolt if you look around. You can get a receiver hitch but install is a bit tricky. In general I would say it is a major upgrade from your last car and the only downside is you might have room to buy more kit for your drum set. Seriously, make sure everything fits and if it does the Bolt is a great choice and the back hatch opens nice and wide.
 

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I knew that the Quick Charge was on option on my Mitsu - but that was 2012. I would have thought that QC would be a 'standard' option on a 2017+ model.
I did read a report that the battery was holding up well. And then I read from GM that it could be anything from 10%-40%. That was kind of shocking.
 

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There are a couple threads on this forum re: hitches and towing. I added a 1 1/4" Draw-Tite receiver to my 2019 Bolt and pull a small 25 HP boat with it. No problem. We have a cabin on a lake about 90 miles from home, and I've been towing the boat back & forth without problems. Towing the boat drops my range by 30-40%. I recharge while at the lake. Working out well.
 

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I knew that the Quick Charge was on option on my Mitsu - but that was 2012. I would have thought that QC would be a 'standard' option on a 2017+ model.
I did read a report that the battery was holding up well. And then I read from GM that it could be anything from 10%-40%. That was kind of shocking.
DCFC still an option on the Bolt's, so make sure you check for it.

From what i have seen everywhere, the degradation is relatively minimal on the battery (it was engineered for longevity apparently, perhaps maybe too conservatively ;)) . 8% or less at 100,000 miles.
Check out @NewsCoulomb video's on youtube. He fast charges a lot and has only minor degradation thus far.
 

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I knew that the Quick Charge was on option on my Mitsu - but that was 2012. I would have thought that QC would be a 'standard' option on a 2017+ model.
I did read a report that the battery was holding up well. And then I read from GM that it could be anything from 10%-40%. That was kind of shocking.
Quick Charge has unfortunately, always been optional on Bolts, at least in the US. Only way to tell if it has it is the sticker on new Bolts, and\or open the charge hatch and see if there is an orange flap covering the lower pins.

Charging on QC is a bit slower than many modern EV, it maxes at about 55kW, provided the EVSE is higher power than that. You won't always get 55kW, it depends on SOC and temps, but in ideal conditions, you will come really close.

Battery degradation seems to be minimal. Check out the @NewsCoulomb YouTube channel where he covers his degradation in a 2017 Bolt, he estimates around 8% I recall. He is a regular on this forum as well. He commented that he is perhaps more of a "stress tester" than most Bolt owners as he is up to 120K miles, does 500+ mile trips almost every weekend (it seems), lots of DCFC in all kinds of temperatures, and a propensity to live up to the nickname someone on this forum gave him, 1% Eric. He seems to like flirting with danger, charging no more than he has to in order to reach the next charge stop, and often arrives with 1-2% SOC.

Consensus seems to be Bolt batteries are better than many WRT degradation, largely due to good thermal management of the pack, restricted charge speed on DCFC. The things to avoid to keep the battery as healthy as possible seem to be:

1. Attempt to keep SOC between 20-80%, only charging to 100% when needed.
2. Limit DCFC use if it is not necessary, but by all means use it if you need it.
3. Leave the car plugged in when temps are "extreme". Basically, anything under 30F and over 95F you should be plugged in, even if not actively charging. Why? Because thermal management runs more often when plugged in, allowing the system to keep battery temps in more optimal temp ranges.
4. Fast charging and discharging are perhaps the biggest culprits. Since GM addresses the fast charging, your only concern would be fast discharge, limit the lead foot.

Like anything in life, it is all about moderation. Use the full capabilities when necessary, but moderate your driving habits and you may well end up with a 300K mile car 25 years down the road.
 

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Just do it!
Bolt is awesome - tons of interior room, plenty of people towing small trailers bike racks & even small boats or jet skiis.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
1. Attempt to keep SOC between 20-80%, only charging to 100% when needed.
2. Limit DCFC use if it is not necessary, but by all means use it if you need it.
3. Leave the car plugged in when temps are "extreme". Basically, anything under 30F and over 95F you should be plugged in, even if not actively charging. Why? Because thermal management runs more often when plugged in, allowing the system to keep battery temps in more optimal temp ranges.
4. Fast charging and discharging are perhaps the biggest culprits. Since GM addresses the fast charging, your only concern would be fast discharge, limit the lead foot.

Like anything in life, it is all about moderation. Use the full capabilities when necessary, but moderate your driving habits and you may well end up with a 300K mile car 25 years down the road.
Thanks - I know that I pushed my little iMiev a bit hard. I didn't QDC much - but several 3 or 4 500 mile trips. In four years I was just touching 50k. But with such a small battery, I charged every night 100%, and usually at more amps than suggested - 110v @ 13 amps... and often level 2 - 220V @ 11 amps - just to make sure I could get a little more than my normal commute in and have heat in the winter.
I was experiencing about 15-20% degredation to my estimates. I was/am very sad that it was totaled. But, on the other hand, it has forced me to upgrade.
 

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Going from the i-MiEV to the Bolt EV would be like going from night to day. The Bolt EV has more room with the seats down 56.6 cu/ft (though the i-MiEV isn't too shabby itself with 50.4 cu/ft). The biggest differences you'll notice is range and power. The Bolt EV will go about four times farther on a charge and reach 60 mph in about half the time.

Yes, you'll want to verify that it has CCS charging (the little orange flap and DC connectors in the charge port). I think GM intended to sell a lot of the Bolt EVs as fleet vehicles, which wouldn't really require CCS charging, so the $750 difference might have seemed worth it.

In terms of charging speed, you'll be adding range at about the same rate as you did in your i-MiEV, but because you'll be adding three to four times as much range, you can be spending three to four times as long charging. It's not all bad, though. Because it's longer between stops, you can put those stops to better use (breaks, meals, shopping, etc.).

As other's have noted, I've put over 120,000 miles on my Bolt EV, and my battery degradation appears to be about 8% right now. Of course, I'm not a typical user, so I wouldn't be surprised if most Bolt EV owners experienced about half the degradation I've seen after 120,000 miles.
 

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limit the lead foot
I'll do everything else, but not this. Battery degradation won't limit me with my lead foot, but I do back off a little so my tires will last longer. I lost a frightening amount of thread on my front tires early in my ownership. Rotated once and have left those on the rear. I'm doing better now and tires appear to be lasting longer.
 

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Going from the i-MiEV to the Bolt EV would be like going from night to day. The Bolt EV has more room with the seats down 56.6 cu/ft (though the i-MiEV isn't too shabby itself with 50.4 cu/ft). The biggest differences you'll notice is range and power. The Bolt EV will go about four times farther on a charge and reach 60 mph in about half the time.

Yes, you'll want to verify that it has CCS charging (the little orange flap and DC connectors in the charge port). I think GM intended to sell a lot of the Bolt EVs as fleet vehicles, which wouldn't really require CCS charging, so the $750 difference might have seemed worth it.

In terms of charging speed, you'll be adding range at about the same rate as you did in your i-MiEV, but because you'll be adding three to four times as much range, you can be spending three to four times as long charging. It's not all bad, though. Because it's longer between stops, you can put those stops to better use (breaks, meals, shopping, etc.).

As other's have noted, I've put over 120,000 miles on my Bolt EV, and my battery degradation appears to be about 8% right now. Of course, I'm not a typical user, so I wouldn't be surprised if most Bolt EV owners experienced about half the degradation I've seen after 120,000 miles.
Well, as a drummer, he deciding point will be if my kit, the full kit, fits in the car. The iMiev did just fine, till I added the second kick drum... Then I had to drive the pickup to gigs ;-(
 

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I knew that the Quick Charge was on option on my Mitsu - but that was 2012. I would have thought that QC would be a 'standard' option on a 2017+ model.
I did read a report that the battery was holding up well. And then I read from GM that it could be anything from 10%-40%. That was kind of shocking.
It is "standard" in the sense that in 2 months of searching online back in Dec/Jan between Florida and Md.,I didn't see a single Bolt without the fast charge option. There may be one out there somewhere though. If you're shopping online,nearly every Chevy dealer has a small icon in the listing that shows the window sticker and the DCFC is listed there.
 

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Well, as a drummer, he deciding point will be if my kit, the full kit, fits in the car. The iMiev did just fine, till I added the second kick drum... Then I had to drive the pickup to gigs ;-(
I haven't done a direct comparison of the spacing between the two cars. Frankly, I was surprised that the i-MiEV had that much seat down cargo capacity, as that makes it larger than any sub $40,000 EV other than the Chevy Bolt EV and KIA Niro EV. If the Bolt EV's configuration works, and the extra 6 cu/ft can fit a kick drum, it should work for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I haven't done a direct comparison of the spacing between the two cars. Frankly, I was surprised that the i-MiEV had that much seat down cargo capacity, as that makes it larger than any sub $40,000 EV other than the Chevy Bolt EV and KIA Niro EV. If the Bolt EV's configuration works, and the extra 6 cu/ft can fit a kick drum, it should work for you.
I ordered one to be delivered to the nearest CarMax - where I bought my iMiev, so I can go get my hands on one. From the different reviews I"ve read and watched - people are really impressed at the get up and go and the regen, but lackluster about the seats, the quality of the interior and the rear suspension - all marked as 'cheap'. Things like the seats being too small without much padding to lots of windshield glare from the acres of plastic on the light colored dash.
Any thoughts from folks here? My iMiev had a horribly cheap interior. But that isn't why I bought it. It was out in production before the leaf and was designed as just a commuter run about - the issue was, being so early on, it was a cheaply made car with a $30+k price tag. But now, with real life range at that $30k sweet spot, a $30k interior would be nice.
Anyone here dissappointed in their interior?
 

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The interior is basic, but doesnt bother me a bit. If you desire a nicer interior, the Bolt wont be for you.
Apple Carplay is nice. That sold me on mine.

You will thoroughly enjoy the test drive though 🏎. Enjoy.

If you're buying used, you should be able to get one for under $20k though. That is where i would start anyway. New LT's can be found for $26'ish depending on where you live (before state/local rebates).
 

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The interior is basic, but doesnt bother me a bit. If you desire a nicer interior, the Bolt wont be for you.
Apple Carplay is nice. That sold me on mine.

You will thoroughly enjoy the test drive though 🏎. Enjoy.

If you're buying used, you should be able to get one for under $20k though. That is where i would start anyway. New LT's can be found for $26'ish depending on where you live (before state/local rebates).
yeah, I'm an androider... they have that too - so that is a big step up for me. I was considering getting a 2din dash for my iMiev and an android head before it was wrecked.... I'm sure that the interior will be a step or two up from the iMiev as well. People complained about it to - but that little car was just a brute.... I would buy their iMiev van in a heart beat if they would bring it over, even with sub 100 miles range....
 

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I ordered one to be delivered to the nearest CarMax - where I bought my iMiev, so I can go get my hands on one. From the different reviews I"ve read and watched - people are really impressed at the get up and go and the regen, but lackluster about the seats, the quality of the interior and the rear suspension - all marked as 'cheap'. Things like the seats being too small without much padding to lots of windshield glare from the acres of plastic on the light colored dash.
Any thoughts from folks here? My iMiev had a horribly cheap interior. But that isn't why I bought it. It was out in production before the leaf and was designed as just a commuter run about - the issue was, being so early on, it was a cheaply made car with a $30+k price tag. But now, with real life range at that $30k sweet spot, a $30k interior would be nice.
Anyone here dissappointed in their interior?
It seems like forever since I've sat in a i-MiEV (I still had my EVO X at the time, so it might have been nearly a decade ago). The interior wasn't great, and frankly, I think the Bolt EV's interior would be a huge step up. However, that being said, the Bolt EV does not have a premium interior. I think most of the complaints you hear about interior quality are from people who got Premier trim, and from that perspective, I agree with them. There's almost no difference in the interiors between the LT and Premier other than a strip of LED lights and the option for leather seats (which actually exacerbate the thin cushioning). If you're going to pay a $4,000 to $5,000 premium, you expect to have a slightly nicer interior than the base version, but that didn't happen.

The seats are the seats, though. They are narrow, yes, but that's based on the width of the car. The Hyundai Kona Electric has the exact same size seats, so really, the only differences are in power adjustment and the amount of cushioning. If that means the Bolt EV's seats are cheap, then I guess they are. I haven't had an issue with them, and in fact, I didn't even realize they were a problem until a Tesla Model S owner started bouncing up and down on my seats at an EV car show trying to convince his friend how uncomfortable they were. His friend sat in them and shrugged, but the harping on continued. It's become quite a thing. Sit in them. Decide for yourself. That's all I can say.

The rear suspension is a torsion beam suspension, which some claim is cheap. In dollars, they're right. Torsion beam suspensions are used to reduce cost, weight, and complexity, but in terms of performance, there's little to no difference between them and independent rear suspensions outside of an actual track/performance car. I test drove the 2019 KIA Niro EV, which has an independent rear suspension, and the handling was cringe-worthy by comparison (I've never driven another car that made Highway 1 such an unfun experience). The rear springs in the 2017s are a little harsh (they were tuned by a race car driver, ha!), but somewhere between 2018 and 2019, Chevy softened the ride. When I test drove the 2020 Bolt EV with the updated suspension, it's an all-around improvement: softer ride without giving up much of the handling.

There are definitely glare issues in the Chevy Bolt EV. The combination of shiny pieces, light dash color, and A LOT of windows makes this a problem. I think most Bolt EV owners would agree that they don't want to give up the windows (the Bolt EV is one of the best cars I've ever driven in terms of visibility), so something else does need to be addressed. I think going over every surface in the interior with a matte finish would be a good idea. Still, the glare is only bad in certain circumstances, and keeping the inside of the windshield clean goes a long way.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I see lots of suggestions to get the 'darker' interior.
I would assume that there is an app or remote for pre-heating or pre-cooling the car while it is plugged in? I actually saw a gal park her Bolt in the Trader Joes Parking lot with her dog in it with the windows up. I tried to remember it the Bolt had the ability to cool the interior in a situation like that. I think it can?
I will have to go on youtube and see if I can find some vids about that. The iMiev remote was archaic at best. you had to pull out a little antenna and even then, you had to be pretty dang close to the car. I was hoping that the Bolt would have some kind of cellular or wifi connectivity.

Overall, If I think my drums will fit, with a passenger (or bring a 'normal' sized kit and maybe a third person) I will likely go with the Bolt. I come from a family of GM owners for the most part. My last ICE rig was my dad's 1989 GMC Sierra 1500 4x4. The $160/month in gas alone was enough to push me over the edge and get the iMiev. With next to no cash in hand, I financed it, paid for full coverage, extra electricity and still was paying less a month to get to work and back. Then you start adding in the maintenance cost - and I was coming out waaaay ahead. But I did miss my truck!!! But I can't think of going back to GAS!
 

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btw - my iMieve came with a 110v EVSE. I sent that out to a company called EVSEupgrade - which is no longer around - to have it changed to have a 220 plug put on the end. It was also changed to be programmable (very manually) from 6-13 amps on the the 110v and 9-13amps (I think) on 220v. The EVSE didn't care what you plugged it into. I bought an adapter that allowed me to plug into a normal 3 prong 110v outlet, but the EVSEupgrade changed the plug end on the brick to a NEMA L6 style.
If I am reading the sites correctly, it looks like the Bolt comes stock with just the 110v EVSE. Can that be adapted to be used with 220v?
 

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I see lots of suggestions to get the 'darker' interior.
I would assume that there is an app or remote for pre-heating or pre-cooling the car while it is plugged in? I actually saw a gal park her Bolt in the Trader Joes Parking lot with her dog in it with the windows up. I tried to remember it the Bolt had the ability to cool the interior in a situation like that. I think it can?
I will have to go on youtube and see if I can find some vids about that. The iMiev remote was archaic at best. you had to pull out a little antenna and even then, you had to be pretty dang close to the car. I was hoping that the Bolt would have some kind of cellular or wifi connectivity.

Overall, If I think my drums will fit, with a passenger (or bring a 'normal' sized kit and maybe a third person) I will likely go with the Bolt. I come from a family of GM owners for the most part. My last ICE rig was my dad's 1989 GMC Sierra 1500 4x4. The $160/month in gas alone was enough to push me over the edge and get the iMiev. With next to no cash in hand, I financed it, paid for full coverage, extra electricity and still was paying less a month to get to work and back. Then you start adding in the maintenance cost - and I was coming out waaaay ahead. But I did miss my truck!!! But I can't think of going back to GAS!
Yes, there is an option for "preconditioning." I wouldn't use that for a pet, though, because it shuts off after 20 minutes (even when plugged in). It can be activated remotely, though, through the MyChevy app. I actually had to do a 200+ mile run the other day with my dog in the car (temperatures were 95 to 100 F). In that case, I just left the car on and locked with the AC running at max LO. It will stay on that way for an hour, but I still advise caution. And in my case, because I was already low on battery, I was doing that while plugged into a DCFC, but L2 AC would work too.

The Bolt EV also has a standard Wi-Fi hotspot, and yes, it will connect through the internet (OnStar uses this data connection).
 
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