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Discussion Starter #1
I want to install my own 50 AMP breaker for a NEMA 14-15 outlet. I've never messed with breakers before but I'm comfortable with electricity. I've wired tons of stuff in my own house. Process seems pretty straightforward when looking at DIY guides on the interwebs... however I only have a spot for a single breaker left on my panel and a 50 AMP breaker needs two spots. Does this mean I would have to install a subpanel? Does this make things a lot more complicated?

Thanks!
Todd
 

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I want to install my own 50 AMP breaker for a NEMA 14-15 outlet. I've never messed with breakers before but I'm comfortable with electricity. I've wired tons of stuff in my own house. Process seems pretty straightforward when looking at DIY guides on the interwebs... however I only have a spot for a single breaker left on my panel and a 50 AMP breaker needs two spots. Does this mean I would have to install a subpanel? Does this make things a lot more complicated?

Thanks!
Todd
You may be able to replace a couple 15 Amp breakers with a couple half sized breakers to free up some space for the 50. Do a search for Tandem Breaker. Do not double tap any breakers. Adding a sub panel is significantly more work.

As for doing your own electrical, only you can know if you are comfortable with it - Not knowing you, or your qualifications, I would say this can be dangerous and may be well worth the cost of an electrician to have it done properly.
 

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You may be able to replace a couple 15 Amp breakers with a couple half sized breakers to free up some space for the 50. Do a search for Tandem Breaker. Do not double tap any breakers. Adding a sub panel is significantly more work.

As for doing your own electrical, only you can know if you are comfortable with it - Not knowing you, or your qualifications, I would say this can be dangerous and may be well worth the cost of an electrician to have it done properly.
This. You'll need to buy in addition to the 50 amp 240v breaker also something like this-



They are available for most brands of panels and come in 15/15, 15/20 and 20/20 amp configurations. This will free up the space you need most likely.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You may be able to replace a couple 15 Amp breakers with a couple half sized breakers to free up some space for the 50. Do a search for Tandem Breaker. Do not double tap any breakers. Adding a sub panel is significantly more work.
Well my panel is full... and already full of a lot of tandems. The only breakers I can consolidate are 4 - 15amp AFCI breakers. Do they make tandem AFCI breakers? A google search is not yielding me promising results :-/

I've attached a picture of my panel... any other ideas?

Thanks,
Todd
 

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Well my panel is full... and already full of a lot of tandems. The only breakers I can consolidate are 4 - 15amp AFCI breakers. Do they make tandem AFCI breakers? A google search is not yielding me promising results :-/

I've attached a picture of my panel... any other ideas?

Thanks,
Todd
You could do a tandem 240 on the current A/C slots like you have for the dryer/cooktop.

You might need to install it as a 40 to match the A/C.

That would give you a 32A EVSE and max out the charge rate on the Bolt. And yes, a 40A breaker on a 14-50 is fine.
 

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Thanks Gary, Is this right: (my post count isn't high enough to post links)

homedepot.com/p/Eaton-Two-40-Amp-2-Pole-Type-BR-BQC-Quadplex-Circuit-Breaker-BQC240240/100557207?MERCH=REC-_-PIPHorizontal1_rr-_-100167402-_-100557207-_-N

I was going to get the 40A Clipper Creek w/ 14-50 anyways so this might be perfect.
 

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You could do a tandem 240 on the current A/C slots like you have for the dryer/cooktop.

You might need to install it as a 40 to match the A/C.

That would give you a 32A EVSE and max out the charge rate on the Bolt. And yes, a 40A breaker on a 14-50 is fine.
Could also replace the wall oven breakers with a tandem.

There's also a free slot at the bottom of the panel. The 20A breaker above that one is labeled Hood. You could pull that breaker and install a tandem breaker that has 2 20A single pole breakers with a double pole 40A breaker:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-One-40-Amp-2-Pole-and-Two-20-Amp-1-Poles-Type-BR-BQ-Quadplex-Circuit-Breaker-BQ2402120/100543911
And there's a 50A version available:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-One-50-Amp-2-Pole-and-Two-20-Amp-1-Poles-Type-BR-BQ-Quadplex-Circuit-Breaker-BQ2502120/100140850
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Got my equipment, I'm going to double up the Hood Fan breaker. Since the 14-50 is rated for 50 amps I got a 50 amp breaker and 6 gauge wire.

Is it ok that the receptacle is 14-50R ? Not sure what that 'R' means.

Also, I was told I could remove the metal bracket connecting the two 20 amp breakers to make them 'singles' instead of a 'double'... true?
 

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Got my equipment, I'm going to double up the Hood Fan breaker. Since the 14-50 is rated for 50 amps I got a 50 amp breaker and 6 gauge wire.

Is it ok that the receptacle is 14-50R ? Not sure what that 'R' means.

Also, I was told I could remove the metal bracket connecting the two 20 amp breakers to make them 'singles' instead of a 'double'... true?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector

the “R” in the NEMA notation means “receptical” or the female of the tandem

“P” stands for plug or the male part of most cords…

NEMA 5-15R - is a normal house hold outlet
NEMA 5-15P - is the 3 prong plug on the end of most electrical device cords…

NEMA 14-50R - is the receptacle you install on your wall
NEMA 14-50P - is the plug/connector that will be on the end of your EVSE charger
 

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There are many many NEMA plugs - most you will never encounter in real life.
NEMA adapters have notation - the number before the hyphen is the connector “type” the number after the hyphen typically indicates breaker AMP load - all AMPs should be “discounted” by 80% for the proper charge setting on a Tesla (20 AMP * 80% = 16 AMP charge setting on the Tesla charge screen)!!
NEMA 5 Connectors are 120v 3 prong (hot, neutral, ground)!
NEMA 6 Connectors are 240v 3 prong (hot, hot, ground)!
NEMA 14 Connectors are 240v 4 prong (hot, hot, neutral, ground)!!
“P” - stands for “plug” or male connector!
“R” - stands for “receptacle” or a female connector!
“L” - stands for “locking” connector - typically twists/locks in to a “R” receptacle!!
so a NEMA L14-50P breaks down as follows:!!
L = locking!!
14 = 4 prong connector!!
50 = MAX 50 AMP Service!!
P = Plug - or male connector!!
 

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Thanks guys! And how does that breaker I bought look???
I don't see anything wrong with removing that metal bracket. The breakers work individually, the bracket itself just makes sure that both legs trip if one does in a 240 configuration. Also,if you were to "turn off the breaker" on a 240V appliance that didn't have this bracket, it would still be live if you don't turn off both (it's probably illegal to power a 240V circuit without a shared tripping mechanism).

The actual breaker components do not change from 120-240v configuration so you are fine to remove that bracket if using them in two separate 120V circuits.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks again everyone. I took a peek under the hood of my panel and cut away the drywall between the panel and receptacle location. It all looks straightforward from this point now that I have all the supplies I need. I plan to take pics of the process and post a DIY here to help future DIY'ers.
 
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