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It is inconvenient to charge only up to 90% or say when at 30%. And for some to park indoors.
Say you charge to 95% and it catches fire. Or your house burns down. Does doing these things reduce your claim against GM if bad things happen?
 

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Wonder how many owners have not received any form of Recall Notice and/or “suggested” charge/storage protocols, seems that GM has not removed their potential LIABILITY.

How have Lessees & Owners been receiving their Recall Notices, trackable with signature required?

Would be interesting to know how many “owners” who have had a fire were in receipt of The Recall???
 

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We may also start to see incomplete (close mouthed) or distorted (lying) reports from owners as to the charge status at the time of the fire to prevent losing leverage in any forthcoming legal battles where they could get called out for not following the new guidelines.
 

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We may also start to see incomplete (close mouthed) or distorted (lying) reports from owners as to the charge status at the time of the fire to prevent losing leverage in any forthcoming legal battles where they could get called out for not following the new guidelines.
Is that information traceable through OnStar?
 

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On a long term basis of habits as you drive, yes. For the last specific event, no. It probably wouldn't be uploaded until the car was outside and turned on at the earliest.
If your Bolt received the latest recall software, the car is automatically turned on for extra cooling of the battery 4 hours after charging. The battery status would be automatically uploaded via OnStar at this time. The OnStar connection behaves just like your cell phone inside a house. As long as you have cell phone signal, the connection to OnStar is there! GM has already started to identify cars that receive regular deep charging outside their recommendation. GM already sent out battery replacement letters to these cars first.
 

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It is inconvenient to charge only up to 90% or say when at 30%. And for some to park indoors.
Say you charge to 95% and it catches fire. Or your house burns down. Does doing these things reduce your claim against GM if bad things happen?
IANAL, but as a potential juror, I would say no. GM's guidance takes the form of recommendations. GM has to expect that some owners will not be able to follow the recommendations, and GM's laborious buyback process and the lack of loaners / rentals means GM knows some owners will have to use their Bolts, charge to near 100%, discharge below 30%, and park indoors.

On the other hand, if you spend a lot of time on a public Internet forum complaining about GM's guidance (demonstrating that you know about it), and telling everyone that they should get a buyback and/or GM should buy back all Bolts ever made because every one might burst into flame at any moment - but you personally never seek a buyback and ignore all the guidance - then as a juror, I might look at you a little differently.
 

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.... Does doing these things reduce your claim against GM if bad things happen?
Has anyone that had a Bolt fire gotten any financial help from GM after the owner's auto and home owner's insurance paid their parts?
 

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Has anyone that had a Bolt fire gotten any financial help from GM after the owner's auto and home owner's insurance paid their parts?
Voluntarily? I would doubt it. You (or more likely your insurance company, or possibly both) would sue GM. My insurer called it subrogation - they would pay my claim and go after GM.
 

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Voluntarily? I would doubt it. You (or more likely your insurance company, or possibly both) would sue GM. ...
There's a PR opportunity for gm.
Why make an unlucky Bolt owner fight for compensation?

I know I'd be 'upside down', or whatever it's called, if mine burns.
Dang, I usually park next to a Model 3 at the free public L2 and a company pickup on the other side.
Should I up my insurance coverage because those two vehicles are also toast if it happens?

Gap Insurance was only offered for the first two months of starting the financing.

Getting a replacement EV would be impossible right now, it sounds.
And who knows what the 'Book Value' of a Bolt is at the moment, and it's bound to change (weekly?).
 

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IANAL, but my gut tells me no...
GM is still ultimately responsible.. (And your insurance company, etc...)

That said, there are states that have some "partial responsibility" calculations when coming up with percentages of responsibility, so...
Maybe...
If it went to a jury and the car owner came off as flagrantly disregarding safety suggestions???

Maybe...
 

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Since AFAIK, GM has never formally, legally notified any owners of even the "guidance." However, to place limits on an owner's ability to use the car as sold would essentially make the case for class action suits certain to come.

but you personally never seek a buyback and ignore all the guidance - then as a juror, I might look at you a little differently.
How likely is it GM would ever choose a jury trial? The preponderance of evidence presented to the public; what they knew and when they knew it, would be far more incriminating than what an owner did or didn't do. Especially since GM chose never to formally notify him of what they knew of the fire risks.

jack vines
 

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If your Bolt received the latest recall software, the car is automatically turned on for extra cooling of the battery 4 hours after charging. The battery status would be automatically uploaded via OnStar at this time. The OnStar connection behaves just like your cell phone inside a house. As long as you have cell phone signal, the connection to OnStar is there! GM has already started to identify cars that receive regular deep charging outside their recommendation. GM already sent out battery replacement letters to these cars first.
Source on that?
 

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There's a PR opportunity for gm.
Why make an unlucky Bolt owner fight for compensation?

I know I'd be 'upside down', or whatever it's called, if mine burns.
Dang, I usually park next to a Model 3 at the free public L2 and a company pickup on the other side.
Should I up my insurance coverage because those two vehicles are also toast if it happens?

Gap Insurance was only offered for the first two months of starting the financing.

Getting a replacement EV would be impossible right now, it sounds.
And who knows what the 'Book Value' of a Bolt is at the moment, and it's bound to change (weekly?).
I have an umbrella liability policy on top of what my regular insurance would cover. In the instance that the property damage from a Bolt fire exceeds the limits on the auto policy, the umbrella kicks in. I'd definitely recommend people carry enough insurance to cover that sort of an event.
 

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IANAL, but as a potential juror, I would say no. GM's guidance takes the form of recommendations. GM has to expect that some owners will not be able to follow the recommendations, and GM's laborious buyback process and the lack of loaners / rentals means GM knows some owners will have to use their Bolts, charge to near 100%, discharge below 30%, and park indoors.

On the other hand, if you spend a lot of time on a public Internet forum complaining about GM's guidance (demonstrating that you know about it), and telling everyone that they should get a buyback and/or GM should buy back all Bolts ever made because every one might burst into flame at any moment - but you personally never seek a buyback and ignore all the guidance - then as a juror, I might look at you a little differently.
IANAL either, but certainly agree here.

I tried to figure out how to follow the guidance, and realized I wasn't able to conduct my normal trips. I then reached out to gm for a buyback/swap and insisted all communication be done in writing via email. When I have had to violate their guidance, I've written to the concierge and explained it, and I've asked for guidance and a loaner for known times when I'm going to need to violate their guidance. gm so far has maintained radio silence, but at least I can show I was aware, I tried, and was working within gm's process. If my Bolt does catch on fire I wanted written records showing my concern, and my attempts.
 

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I have an umbrella liability policy on top of what my regular insurance would cover. In the instance that the property damage from a Bolt fire exceeds the limits on the auto policy, the umbrella kicks in. I'd definitely recommend people carry enough insurance to cover that sort of an event.
As a "high net worth" individual I have an umbrella policy. Unless I park between two Italian supercars and total both of them, I should be OK.
 

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The recommendations from GM now are cautionary. Whatever damage in the battery from deep cycling is already there from previous usage by owner. The OnStar monthly report is already tracking all charging and driving cycles for each car. GM can identify batteries that are more risky to fire by reviewing OnStar data.
 

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Source on that?
Just check your OnStar monthly report and look for charging and driving history link. All of your charging and driving history are recorded. When charging, the car is considered ON and connected to OnStar. The recall just adds extra ON time to the charging session.
 
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