Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
my puppy decided to do a little chewing on my portable charge cord. the little bugger chewed up the AC supply cord, close to the plug. i wanted to cut off the damaged section and replace the plug. I cut the damaged end off to find that not only are there the three expected conductors, line (black), neutral (white), ground (green), but there are two other wires, orange and red. I had thought all the signal wires were between the car and the charger, but it looks like there are some between the power source and the charger as well. Does anyone know what to do with the red and orange wires at the plug end? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,808 Posts
If it's the EVSE supplied with the car I believe there's a temperature sensor in the plug so that the unit can shut itself off if the receptacle box overheats. You can try leaving the extra wires (which I assume are of a much smaller gauge - i.e., thinner) disconnected and see if it works that way. Just be aware that you won't have that added protection of detecting a "hot box". Not so much of a problem if you always use it with your own home wiring which you know and trust, possibly less desirable if you use it in places where the wiring is unvetted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I believe one wire is the control wire to prevent the car from starting when connected to the EVSE, and he other wire tells the charger how much current it can draw from the EVSE, plus a few other control functions.

Wikipedia has some information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,808 Posts
I believe one wire is the control wire to prevent the car from starting when connected to the EVSE, and he other wire tells the charger how much current it can draw from the EVSE, plus a few other control functions.
Starterdude is talking about the cable that plugs into the wall, not the cable the plugs into the car.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
350 Posts
Anything unusual inside the 120v plug? Check to see if the two spare wires are connected to anything

If not, I'd ignore the other two wires.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,564 Posts
Maybe you can splice the original plug back on if there is enough cord left on the plug end. Also, there is a remote chance that you could get a replacement AC feeder assembly for it. In the latter instance, it would be nice to know who actually made it for GM so you could deal them directly. The parts counter at your Chevy dealer will be worthless for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
I would have to agree with @dayone , Just go and buy another cable. Trying to fix wires could result in changes in resistance and could alter outputs which could result in some sort of issue? I'm not very techy, but it doesn't seem like something that should be tampered with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
I would have to see it to add my comments, but I have repaired several AC extension cables. The secret is to splice the wire with a crimper that uses pressure to crush the connector together with the wire. The basic wire crimper sold in many auto shops and hardware stores should do with a size 12-14 gage crimp for the AC line, neutral, and ground. Then use heat shrink tubing around the crimped splices to make them watertight (and weatherproof) in the case you need to use the EVSE outdoors.

My experience with crimps is perfect, as none of my repairs has failed. I used 6 gage wire inside my JuiceBox EVSE with crimped terminals, but I needed a special anvil (and a heavy hammer) for those large copper terminals. All commercial equipment use crimped terminals and splices.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,564 Posts
I would have to see it to add my comments, but I have repaired several AC extension cables. The secret is to splice the wire with a crimper that uses pressure to crush the connector together with the wire. The basic wire crimper sold in many auto shops and hardware stores should do with a size 12-14 gage crimp for the AC line, neutral, and ground. Then use heat shrink tubing around the crimped splices to make them watertight (and weatherproof) in the case you need to use the EVSE outdoors.

My experience with crimps is perfect, as none of my repairs has failed. I used 6 gage wire inside my JuiceBox EVSE with crimped terminals, but I needed a special anvil (and a heavy hammer) for those large copper terminals. All commercial equipment use crimped terminals and splices.
Not just crimps either. There are accepted practices outlined in most factory service manuals for solder splices. It involves stripping back, twisting together, soldering the union, folding it back and then covering with shrink tubing.

Of course a brand new cord is the way to go if you can.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,564 Posts
Crimpers are possibly the worst ways of splicing wires together.
@DaV8or has it spot on there. Crimps can fail very easily.
Crimping can be great, in fact it is all that is allowed for splicing in aircraft. The key is to use a calibrated crimping tool with the proper butt splice, or terminal. The problem is most people working on cars and in the home just use whatever, with whatever and squeeze until the veins in the forehead pop out. One can both under crimp and over crimp. Both lead to failure eventually and the only way to be consistent is with the proper tool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
Unless you're confident with your splicing skills, I think it's better to just get a new one if possible. These seem to be the kind of accessory that dealerships should carry extras of in case of puppy chewing.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top