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I like cleaner designs and never liked the lower rear lighting but the logic behind it washes that away. Better to be safe than sorry and anyone who really wants to make it look better can do a custom clear lense with the correct bulbs.
 

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2017 Bolt EV LT
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Who the heck is Doug DeMuro and why should I care what he thinks? Must be one of those YouTube personalities.
He's an automotive writer who I came to know at Jalopnik. He broke away and is with these guys now. His last gig was taking suggestions from readers about which car he should buy (hummer, Jaguar, Range Rover etc.), live with it for a year or so, and writing about his experiences. Produced some good articles and videos.
 

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Unlike the title, his review was actually upbeat. He felt the Chevrolet name makes buyers think it is uncool whereas Tesla buyers are fanatics and willing to put $1K down and wait 12-18 months for delivery. Telsa & Apple equal cool. Chevrolet and Android equal uncool to the average buyer. But he also points out that the Bolt is available now and likely delivers a lot of cool features and great range for less than Tesla. At the end of the review he really liked it, especially tech features, range and terrific acceleration. Overall, it was pretty fair. As for me and most other Bolt owners we think it is a great car, costs way less than an ICE, at a fair price.
 

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Here is my 2c what he missed and didn’t show half of really cool features
- L drive mode (one pedal driving)
- awesome re-gen brakes (basically magnets), which don't turn your pads into dust
- low maintenance (in general for EV) when you talk about value (10/10 in my books)
- 200 HP and 60kw battery and can accept 50KW DC charge
- low centre of gravity during cornering, leaving SUV/CUV owners behind you jealous on the ramp. Although, stock tires are not your friend during this stunt.
- flat floor and space for the back seats
- self sealed tires, as a cork or feature :)
- it’s practicality should be 10, since it is a hatchback and by my experience serves family better then CUV (I switched from Acura RDX 2015 to Bolt).
- failed to mention that LG is behind user interface, not GM. Didn't mention tight dependency on Apple CarPlay/Android Car as a cork or feature :)
- failed to mention great battery thermal management, and didn't open hood at all.
- And outstanding 0-20, 0-30, 0-40 performance, again leaving Audi/BMW/Benz puzzled behind you. I have many funny stories on this topic :) Again, stock tires are not for true jump at light stop.
 

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I thought generally upbeat and a positive mark for the Bolt.
One item he didn't mention was the excessive reflection with the white dash that his loaner car came with. As you all know, there have been multiple complaints with this light optional color interior.
During my quest for a purchase, all dealers have no knowlege that the dashboard is a problem, somewhat surprising.
 

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I thought generally upbeat and a positive mark for the Bolt.
One item he didn't mention was the excessive reflection with the white dash that his loaner car came with. As you all know, there have been multiple complaints with this light optional color interior.
During my quest for a purchase, all dealers have no knowlege that the dashboard is a problem, somewhat surprising.
:)Praise the positive, minimize the negative.
 

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The funny thing is, every single automotive journalist and publication has praised the Bolt and said good things about. I don't think I can find a bad review anywhere. Nearly every owner praises it. All in all it sounds like a fantastic car...

Why aren't more people buying it?? I've heard that California dealers are refusing to order any more because their lots are still packed with hundreds. They are now starting to sit on lots nation wide. Most are being discounted significantly. There are great state, county, city, federal and and even utility incentives available. Big incentives in some places.

Meanwhile, Tesla supposedly has 500,000 pre orders for car that they are still putting together by hand and having employees do the beta testing for them on their own dime. Somewhere I read that they're getting 1600 new orders a month or something like that.

This all tells me that GM has terribly misjudged demand from the general public for electric cars and almost completely missed the mark amongst EV enthusiasts. This blunder is going to make it pretty difficult for GM to move ahead with any future BEVs or even PHEVs as Volt sales are also dropping off.

I'm glad I have mine and I'm also still happy with my decision not to go with the Model 3.
 

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@DaV8or - my take:
1.) Decades old (now statistically outdated), American consumer perception that American auto manufacture's product's are inferior in all respects to foreign auto manufacturer's products.
2.) Contrived cult of celebrity phenomena; GM lacks a leader who will exploit mass media, propaganda, or other methods to create an idealized, heroic, and worshipful image of them self - creating devotees of products created and marketed by the company who irrationally cling to them with an almost religious intensity. (Think: Steve Jobs/Elon Musk)
3.) Legacy dealership network who's profits are derived from after-sale services, (understandably) unwilling to promote a car (EV's) that inherently has little prospect of after-sale servicing requirements.
4.) Low information consumers who are challenged with the notion of price vs. cost. (think: TCO)
5.) The EV communities obsession with charging stations - ostensibly to allow EV's the ability of long road trips like ICE vehicles. This is counterproductive as it perpetuates the range anxiety fear of "new-entry" potential consumers. Today's 200+ Mile range BEV's satisfy the needs of 85% of all American drivers diving distance patterns. (Of the 85%; the 0.003% of actual out of range driving trips Americans take annually can be accomplished by renting a car).
 

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@DaV8or - my take:

5.) The EV communities obsession with charging stations - ostensibly to allow EV's the ability of long road trips like ICE vehicles. This is counterproductive as it perpetuates the range anxiety fear of "new-entry" potential consumers. Today's 200+ Mile range BEV's satisfy the needs of 85% of all American drivers diving distance patterns. (Of the 85%; the 0.003% of actual out of range driving trips Americans take annually can be accomplished by renting a car).
I totally agree with this comment. Although, I think it is ICE drivers making contributions to the EV community discussion that perpetuates the obsession with charging stations, rather than real Tesla or Bolt EV drivers. Indeed, the opposite side of the same coin is that the Bolt EV has ushered in an era of the use of dc fast-charging stations for distance driving. In other words, the Bolt EV, like Tesla, has ENABLED long distance driving with an all-electric vehicle. One web site, to do with GM Onstar-derived statistics of EV driving, has a section on the Bolt EV that shows that single day long-distance driving by use of dc fast-chargers is now being done by a good fraction of Bolt drivers. I have indicated my own experiences with such driving elsewhere on this site, where I recount that I have found 450 miles to be eminently feasible in one day with a Bolt EV.
There's no doubt that the Bolt EV can take care of daily driving done by most people, with NO range anxiety whatsoever. Long distance driving has now been proven by a good fraction of ACTUAL OWNERS of Bolt EVs. Unfortunately, there are still only a few Bolt EV drivers around trying to drown out the cacophony of noise by ICE drivers who vow never to buy an all-electric vehicle until it has reached the point that its possible to drive cross-country as easily as with an ICE vehicle. Certainly, I have done a few cross-country drives over the last few decades, but not so many that I would glue my flag so permanently to the ICE machine that I would sacrifice the climate any more than I have done already over the years.
Finally, the obsession with fast-charging stations is largely to do with the time it takes to charge a vehicle in order to quickly plant you back on the road again. The present network of 50kW charging stations is adequate to service the Bolt EV, but more are being installed all the time, which will solve many of the concerns out there for the immediate future. Once EVs with bigger, faster-charging batteries hit the market, the growth of charging stations will continue apace to address day-driving beyond 450-600 miles.
 

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Speaking for myself, I'm holding off buying a Bolt because it still just costs too much. New Hampshire has no state incentives, and my utility has no incentives--not even for charging equipment.

A basic 2018 Chevy Cruze can be had at the nearby dealer for $20K, and it will get 30/40 MPG. The least expensive of the four Bolts in stock runs $39.8K. Yes, that drops to $32.3K with the federal credit, but we're still talking an up-front difference of $12K.

Charging could also be a concern. The charging network is minimal in my area, and by minimal I mean zero. Also, the prospect of lengthy power outages is always in the back of my mind, especially during the winter. We were down for four days in 2008 in my area, and after the most recent storm some towns didn't get power back for over a week.

(I suppose I could charge off my gas powered generator, in a pinch. ;) )

The Bolt is a great car, but EVs are still a niche market, and infrastructure can still be an issue.
 

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Speaking for myself, I'm holding off buying a Bolt because it still just costs too much. New Hampshire has no state incentives, and my utility has no incentives--not even for charging equipment.

A basic 2018 Chevy Cruze can be had at the nearby dealer for $20K, and it will get 30/40 MPG. The least expensive of the four Bolts in stock runs $39.8K. Yes, that drops to $32.3K with the federal credit, but we're still talking an up-front difference of $12K.

Charging could also be a concern. The charging network is minimal in my area, and by minimal I mean zero. Also, the prospect of lengthy power outages is always in the back of my mind, especially during the winter. We were down for four days in 2008 in my area, and after the most recent storm some towns didn't get power back for over a week.

(I suppose I could charge off my gas powered generator, in a pinch. ;) )

The Bolt is a great car, but EVs are still a niche market, and infrastructure can still be an issue.

If I was on a limited budget I would buy a new $12,000 to $18,000 4 cylinder car. There are great values out there. I bought a new Hyundai Elantra in 2003 for under $11,000 and it was bought back by a dealer for $5000. Great little car and is probably still running today. The Bolt in certain parts of California are about the same price as the Cruze after reduction in MSRP, federal credit, state rebates, and local rebates. The Bolt should be on backorder in California, but you can drive to any dealership and see 5 on the lot. Without the subsidies I would probably have waited for used Bolts to hit the lots 3 years from now.
 
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