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I've posted a lengthy review of our experience with the Bolt on my web site.

"In short, we are pleased with the car. It works well for us and in the process has become our sole vehicle. We no longer operate a car with an internal combustion engine. In those circumstances where the Bolt won't meet our needs, we plan to rent a conventional car. Importantly, we haven't had to do so yet."

Driving the Chevy Bolt EV--Our Impressions


September 28, 2018, by Paul Gipe


We leased a Chevy Bolt EV in early November 2017. I've been driving the electric vehicle daily since then. We've also taken it on several round-trip excursions of 300 to 600 miles. I know enough...[more]
 

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That is a very nice and complete report. There is one point I fully disagree with you:
"When you engage aggressive regenerative braking, the brake lights are illuminated. However, the brake lights go off once the car is at rest. I put my foot on the brake pedal when stopped, to illuminate the brake lights for vehicles behind me.

Unless your traffic laws require it, you don't need to put your foot on the brake at rest at all. All drivers must watch the vehicle, not the brake lights, to know if the vehicle is stopped or not. I have seen drivers crawling with the brake lights on!

I don't have any EV, but in all my gasoline engine vehicles when I stop, I shift into "N" and rest my foot away from any pedal. This saves my leg, brake wear, transmission wear, engine wear, and gasoline, as the engine and transmission are not engaged, nor am I fighting the automatic creep with my brakes. As such, my brake pads last longer. My present 2009 Chevy Equinox still has its original factory brake pads, and my previous vehicle, a 1995 Buick Regal, had only three pad replacements in 21 years.

Newer gas vehicles have "transmission lock" so the car doesn't creep in "D" and can hold its position even on an incline without touching the brake pedal. So there is absolutely no obligation to hold your foot on the brake pedal for yourself or the drivers behind you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That is a very nice and complete report. There is one point I fully disagree with you:
"When you engage aggressive regenerative braking, the brake lights are illuminated. However, the brake lights go off once the car is at rest. I put my foot on the brake pedal when stopped, to illuminate the brake lights for vehicles behind me.

Unless your traffic laws require it, you don't need to put your foot on the brake at rest at all. All drivers must watch the vehicle, not the brake lights, to know if the vehicle is stopped or not. I have seen drivers crawling with the brake lights on!

I don't have any EV, but in all my gasoline engine vehicles when I stop, I shift into "N" and rest my foot away from any pedal. This saves my leg, brake wear, transmission wear, engine wear, and gasoline, as the engine and transmission are not engaged, nor am I fighting the automatic creep with my brakes. As such, my brake pads last longer. My present 2009 Chevy Equinox still has its original factory brake pads, and my previous vehicle, a 1995 Buick Regal, had only three pad replacements in 21 years.

Newer gas vehicles have "transmission lock" so the car doesn't creep in "D" and can hold its position even on an incline without touching the brake pedal. So there is absolutely no obligation to hold your foot on the brake pedal for yourself or the drivers behind you.

Not going to argue Raymond. This is my practice. It's not required by law. But the way people drive around here (Bakersfield, California) you don't want to depend on the law to protect you. ;)


Thanks for the compliments, much appreciated.


Paul
 

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Not going to argue Raymond. This is my practice. It's not required by law. But the way people drive around here (Bakersfield, California) you don't want to depend on the law to protect you. ;)
FWIW, my practice is a hybrid approach. I generally sit without my foot on the brake, but I generally do see the mirror out of the corner of my eye. If I see a vehicle looming rather too quickly, I put my foot on the brake. My hope is that seeing my lights come on will encourage them to slow down more aggressively.
 
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