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An interesting find and very useful for people who cannot run a separate NEMA plug to their garage.

Essentially, it shares the power with the dryer. Turn the dryer on and it automatically turns off the charger or the other way around.

If your laundry room is close to your garage but your electric panel isn't this may be something worth exploring.

Also tracks usage and has other on useful onscreen functions.

Runs on NEMA 30 amp only from what i can tell.
 

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I have one, the seller can configure it with any type of plug you like, just remember that a dryer is almost always on a 30 amp breaker, so you are limited to 24 amp EVSE or less. I currently am charging my Bolt using this system and the 16 amp clipper creek EVSE I was using with my Volt before I traded it in on the Bolt EV. I am in the process of moving into my new house where I will have a dedicated 40 amp outlet added in the garage to use with my 32 amp chargepoint EVSE.

Later,

Keith
 

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I have one, the seller can configure it with any type of plug you like, just remember that a dryer is almost always on a 30 amp breaker, so you are limited to 24 amp EVSE or less. I currently am charging my Bolt using this system and the 16 amp clipper creek EVSE I was using with my Volt before I traded it in on the Bolt EV. I am in the process of moving into my new house where I will have a dedicated 40 amp outlet added in the garage to use with my 32 amp chargepoint EVSE.
I think with most (if not all) L2 EVSEs you can configure the maximum charge rate so you don't try to draw more power than your circuit can provide. With the "smart" chargers like a Juicebox you can do this in software but with more basic chargers you may need to open the case and set jumpers or switches.
 

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I think with most (if not all) L2 EVSEs you can configure the maximum charge rate so you don't try to draw more power than your circuit can provide. With the "smart" chargers like a Juicebox you can do this in software but with more basic chargers you may need to open the case and set jumpers or switches.
My 12 amp level 2 EVSE doesn't have any way to configure the rate unless I plug it back into a 110 socket :D
 

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The Siemens VersaCharge is one of the most popular EVSEs on the market. They can be had for as little as ~$350 if you wait for a sale at Costco. There is a little rotating switch inside that will allow you to select 100% (32A), 75% (24A), 50% (16A) and 25% (8A). The 75% setting is ideal for a 30A dryer circuit. The 24A draw meets NEC guidelines of no more than an 80% draw on a circuit.
 

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The Siemens VersaCharge is one of the most popular EVSEs on the market. They can be had for as little as ~$350 if you wait for a sale at Costco. There is a little rotating switch inside that will allow you to select 100% (32A), 75% (24A), 50% (16A) and 25% (8A). The 75% setting is ideal for a 30A dryer circuit. The 24A draw meets NEC guidelines of no more than an 80% draw on a circuit.
I looked into the VersaCharge, and the one that is sold on Amazon maxes out at 30 amps instead of 32 amps, and it doesn't mention adjustable charge rate in the advertising copy...

<edit> Looking at the home depot advertising it mentions adjustable nature, from 30 amps (7.2 KW) down to 7.5 amps (1.8 KW) I would assume the 75% setting is 22.5 amps (5.4 KW) and 50% setting of 15 amps (3.6 KW) </edit>

If purchasing a new EVSE I want the full 32 amps.

Later,

Keith
 

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… and the Siemens VersiCharge can't handle Time Of Use charging negotiation with the Bolt. But that is in another thread.
.
 

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The Siemens VersaCharge is one of the most popular EVSEs on the market. They can be had for as little as ~$350 if you wait for a sale at Costco. There is a little rotating switch inside that will allow you to select 100% (32A), 75% (24A), 50% (16A) and 25% (8A). The 75% setting is ideal for a 30A dryer circuit. The 24A draw meets NEC guidelines of no more than an 80% draw on a circuit.
Interestingly, my Siemens VersiCharge operates fine at 100% on a 30amp circuit and at 75% on a 20amp circuit. I know the rotating switch works however -- when I attempt to run at 100% on a 20amp circuit, the circuit breaker trips in very short order...
 

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Interestingly, my Siemens VersiCharge operates fine at 100% on a 30amp circuit and at 75% on a 20amp circuit. I know the rotating switch works however -- when I attempt to run at 100% on a 20amp circuit, the circuit breaker trips in very short order...
I'd recommend not pulling 30A from a 30A circuit regularly, and I'd never pull 22.5A (75% of 30A) from a 20A circuit. Breakers can (and do) wear out if asked to source their maximum capacity for long. The fact that a 20A breaker isn't tripping for a 22.5A load tells me that the breaker is defective, and you're in danger of having the wiring burn up in a wall. Breakers are cheap, and replacing them isn't all that difficult, if you're careful. I work in my breaker panels with one hand in my pocket.

There's a reason that the NEC states that one should not regularly draw more than 80% of a circuit's current capacity. It's a safety margin.
 

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The Siemens versicharge has an inhibit input that can be used to stop it from charging. It would seem that if you didn’t want to afford a dryer buddy, you could wire up a relay to your dryer and use the dry contacts to inhibit the versicharge.
 
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