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Normally, after driving through a large puddle or water that splashes the brakes, you'd tap the brakes to dry them out before you relied on them to really stop. Even the Bolt's manual recommends this (pg 195). But it got me to thinking: would the instruction to "lightly apply the brake pedal" would actually trigger only regen braking? Or, does the Bolt apply the friction brakes "lightly" ever time the brake pedal is pressed, even if we think it's using 100% regen braking to slow us? If not, I don't see how to squeeze the water out, short of actual hard braking. Unless the Bolt periodically self-applies the brakes specifically for this purpose. I believe my old car did that, but I don't think I saw the Bolt manual mention this.
 

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Regenerative breaking works best when the Bolt EV is moving at high or moderate speeds. So try several low speed brakings and step hard on the pedal so the hydraulic system is active.
 

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I wouldn't really worry too much about it.. at slower speeds you could just lightly place your foot on the brakes and that should be good.
 

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I didn't even know you had to dry brakes after getting them wet. I've never done that with any of my cars and they seemed to work fine.
Cold brakes that get wet will initially perform noticeably worse momentarily. The water is quickly scrubbed and steamed off. It can be a bit of an issue when your traveling fast, like on the freeway and suddenly have to stop. There will be a bit of a delay before your brakes become 100% effective, so in a critical emergency stop it will cost you some stopping distance. It's really not that big of a deal and I don't worry about it much myself, but I am aware of it.
 

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I got my drivers license in 1979- I was unlucky enough to have a few vehicles with drum breaks (at least on the rear axle).
With those abominations you had to "ride them" (by keeping them partially applied with your left foot while you maintained speed with your right foot on the gas pedal) through puddles otherwise you literally had no brakes coming out of puddles :eek:
With the open design of disc brakes, the water is slung off the rotors as soon as you get up to speed so loss of brake effectiveness much less noticeable vs, old style drum brakes.
 

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I personally have never had an issue with brakes getting wet..

When you first get in and make the first stop it could feel slightly less effective but that's pretty much about it. This shouldn't really be a concern at all.
 

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As someone who's been driving the Bolt in the Vancouver area for 2-1/2 months (which have mostly been record setting for rain) I can confidently say you don't need to worry about drying the brakes. Firstly the heavy regen will contribute a lot to a panic stop, so by the time you get into the friction brakes you're getting into them pretty hard which will quickly clear them. Secondly I'm pretty confident that they have a special soft compound in those pads knowing that they'll rarely get used and need to be effective when cold and wet, especially since premature wear is not an issue. Thirdly, with the reduced traction on these LRR tires having absolute stopping power from the brakes is kind of a moot point anyway. If there's anything in that printed manual saying to dab the brakes periodically I think it's most likely remnants from old manuals that someone was too lazy to proof-read and remove. As we've seen, GM is not exactly starting from a clean slate with their paper documentation around this car so copy and paste errors are numerous. IME driving in wet conditions with very long stretches between friction brake application I've never noticed any reduced stopping power due to wet / cold pads which I'm quite familiar with in my other cars. On the odd occasion that I've had to get on the binders the grab was always immediate. Besides even if you wanted to, you'd have to hit the brakes hard enough to get through the regenerative braking (which is pretty hard) and at sufficient speed to actually CLEAR the rotors, which a "light pedal application" will not do.

TLDR, don't worry about it. Just enjoy the regenerative braking saving you from turning costly energy into brake dust :D
 

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Like NY-Rob I grew up with both drum and disk brakes. So far no issues with Bolt braking.

Sean Nelson - last 18 months have been riding a Cannondale gravel bike with Shimano hydraulic disk brakes. Never going back to rim brakes unless it for the bling of Campy skeletons! When I explain them to people I use the analogy of disk brakes in your car versus drums and people get it. Thanks for triggering the association.

I wonder if we'll see someone trick out the Bolt disks sometime soon?!
 

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^ Funny aside for those of us who are old enough to have experienced the "fun" of drum brakes.....

In NY, we've seen a lot of single car high speed crashes on the news lately where someone hits an overpass, tree, building, etc... after losing control. It's primarily due to excessive speed in many cases and the vehicles are a tangled mass of metal afterwards.
I mentioned to my kids that there weren't so many horrific high speed crashes back when I started driving in 1979. When they asked why- I alluded to the fact that we didn't drive as fast as today's cars because were were afraid to simply because with drum brakes... you never really knew if you would be able to stop when needed without fishtailing, doing a 180, swerving into the next lane, etc... during a panic stop situation, so you kept the speed down in areas with traffic control devices.

The good thing is... with today's vehicles- when you hit the brakes.... they actually stop without the white knuckle session :eek:
 

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I remember those days, those were the days I really got used to engine braking. With that level of uncertainty coming from the brakes I always made sure to incorporate more. These days the only engine braking I do is in emergency situations.
 

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^ Funny aside for those of us who are old enough to have experienced the "fun" of drum brakes.....

In NY, we've seen a lot of single car high speed crashes on the news lately where someone hits an overpass, tree, building, etc... after losing control. It's primarily due to excessive speed in many cases and the vehicles are a tangled mass of metal afterwards.
I mentioned to my kids that there weren't so many horrific high speed crashes back when I started driving in 1979. When they asked why- I alluded to the fact that we didn't drive as fast as today's cars because were were afraid to simply because with drum brakes... you never really knew if you would be able to stop when needed without fishtailing, doing a 180, swerving into the next lane, etc... during a panic stop situation, so you kept the speed down in areas with traffic control devices.

The good thing is... with today's vehicles- when you hit the brakes.... they actually stop without the white knuckle session :eek:
Yes. Back in the old days, if you drove really fast and crashed you pretty much died, or went to the hospital with serious injuries. Cars today are so darn safe that the odds are in your favor that you can drive ridiculously fast, crash and likely walk away.

Old cars can go fast, but people just drove a little more fearful in those days. Now it's like- "Nobody ever really gets hurt." This is why the new preferred speed on America's freeways and highways is 80mph+. This is why close tailgating and weaving in and out of traffic with just a few feet in between at 75-80 is the norm. Nobody ever dies, right?
 

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As much as they're safer now, it's still the same level of stupid if not worse at this point considering all the driving aids people rely on.
 

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As much as they're safer now, it's still the same level of stupid if not worse at this point considering all the driving aids people rely on.
That's the sad part, the cars are safer... but the drivers are more careless (and clueless) then ever!
 

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Yes. Back in the old days, if you drove really fast and crashed you pretty much died, or went to the hospital with serious injuries. Cars today are so darn safe that the odds are in your favor that you can drive ridiculously fast, crash and likely walk away.
Actually, I read a study about 5-8 years ago about that. Because of the increased safety features in cars (air bags, side curtain air bags, crumple zones, ...) more and more people are surviving accidents that would have been fatal in 1980 - but they are getting seriously injured (crushed legs instead of crushed heads). Because of this, insurance payouts for medical have gone up considerably in the past 20 years.
 

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Fear makes for safer drivers, this I know from experience. May not have lived through the drum brakes era, but I have skidded before and spun. That has made me take turns a lot slower and leave a larger distance between me and the car in front.

I feel like everyone needs to get a good Virtual Reality goggle scare as part of their licensing test.
 

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Fear doesn't make for safer drivers.

Fear makes for people to panic and over-react in situations which causes a worse situation.
 
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