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Nice metallic red color!

The Bolt EV isn't a "sportscar" so they shouldn't comment or complain about the readings for acceleration, skid pad, and braking as if it was a "sportscar" The tires are thinner and have greater pressure so the numbers look bad, but those tires help the Bolt get better range. That is what they should be testing for. Passenger and driver comforts are much more important than any "performance" numbers.

At the Chey Bolt forum (http://www.chevybolt.org/), there are Bolt owner who get over 300 miles of range, yet there are others who already want to add performace by changing tires and even lowering the ride height, which is also all wrong. But each Bolt owner can do what they want.

I do hope that these tests and evaluations will eventually help sell more Bolts nationwide when the full rollout begins.
 

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I left a comment correcting their supposition that the brakes are hydraulic only.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice metallic red color!

The Bolt EV isn't a "sportscar" so they shouldn't comment or complain about the readings for acceleration, skid pad, and braking as if it was a "sportscar" The tires are thinner and have greater pressure so the numbers look bad, but those tires help the Bolt get better range. That is what they should be testing for. Passenger and driver comforts are much more important than any "performance" numbers.

At the Chey Bolt forum (http://www.chevybolt.org/), there are Bolt owner who get over 300 miles of range, yet there are others who already want to add performace by changing tires and even lowering the ride height, which is also all wrong. But each Bolt owner can do what they want.

I do hope that these tests and evaluations will eventually help sell more Bolts nationwide when the full rollout begins.
Just out of curiosity sake and nothing else, but why do you feel that lowering the ride height would be wrong??
 

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Since we've been informed that the brakes are not "blended", wouldn't that mean that they are not regenerative?
They are absolutely regenerative. Put the car in Drive, go down a hill. Let it coast for a while. Note the regen amount while coasting. then put your foot on the brake and watch the regen amount rise by lot. Press harder (assuming no traffic behind you) and watch it climb even more.
 

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Since we've been informed that the brakes are not "blended", wouldn't that mean that they are not regenerative?
The difference seems to be that the "blended" brakes on the Chevy Volt are "brake-by-wire" systems that only engage the hydraulic brakes on command from the vehicle control computer (unless panic stopping), while those on the Chevy Bolt have a "push-through" rod that mechanically engages the hydraulic brakes when you've pushed it beyond the range of travel where regen braking is maxed out. I took this to mean that it's an implementation difference that achieves the same result - regen braking first, hydraulic braking when you need to slow down faster than regen alone can provide.
 

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The difference seems to be that the "blended" brakes on the Chevy Volt are "brake-by-wire" systems that only engage the hydraulic brakes on command from the vehicle control computer (unless panic stopping), while those on the Chevy Bolt have a "push-through" rod that mechanically engages the hydraulic brakes when you've pushed it beyond the range of travel where regen braking is maxed out. I took this to mean that it's an implementation difference that achieves the same result - regen braking first, hydraulic braking when you need to slow down faster than regen alone can provide.
I think the Bolt and Volt's braking systems may be technically different in how they are designed, but they still both offer regenerative braking if the pedal is depressed, down to a certain point. Then friction brakes kick in. I know I can get regen braking in D using just the brake pedal.
 

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I assume lowering a car's ride height by a substantial amount could affect its steering geometry and put stress on various other suspension and steering system parts. But I've never lowered anything.
 

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I assume lowering a car's ride height by a substantial amount could affect its steering geometry and put stress on various other suspension and steering system parts. But I've never lowered anything.
This is the *first* car I've ever owned *without* a lowered or sport suspension, so you'll have to all bear with me : )

If Ray was discussing range, I'm not sure why he thinks that lowering the car would worsen the range, I think the opposite would be true for less drag, though the difference may be marginal, especially vs. the battery risk. Maybe he just meant suspension geometry.

In the case of my Audi TT, for example, the US versions of the cars were *raised* by about .5" ...by the lawyers...not the engineers. Most cars benefit from a lower center of gravity with regard to their handling, but it has to be done responsibly, or you can affect other suspension parts and tires. FWIW, I've never once had any of those wear issues. It's best to match the shocks and springs, or get coilovers, and application specific adjustable control arms or suspension geometry adjustment kit. If the alignment can be brought to spec and the wheel offsets and scrub radius aren't overly affected, everything falls pretty well into place.
 

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I think the Bolt and Volt's braking systems may be technically different in how they are designed, but they still both offer regenerative braking if the pedal is depressed, down to a certain point. Then friction brakes kick in. I know I can get regen braking in D using just the brake pedal.
As I understand it, the Bolt EV uses different braking hardware than the Spark EV or first generation Volt PHEV but it uses the same basic hardware as the second generation Volt (2016+), Malibu hybrid, and Cadillac CT6 PHEV.

Another trivia item is that while the Bolt EV has the same kind of steering wheel regen paddle as the Cadillac ELR and Volt, the Bolt EV paddle's regen effect can be blended/modulated by the driver by changing the position of the accelerator pedal whereas on the earlier cars engaging the regen paddle would cause the accelerator pedal to be ignored. At least that's how it was explained to me by a GM employee that I talked to. I haven't had a chance to go back and personally try the regen paddle on a Volt/ELR to verify this difference. My own 2011 Volt was too old to have a regen paddle so my experience with using it in a Volt/ELR has been limited.
 

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In the case of my Audi TT, for example, the US versions of the cars were *raised* by about .5" ...by the lawyers...not the engineers.
My 1970 BMW 2002Tii had exactly the same thing. They put 3/4" spacers under the front spring/shock towers to raise the bumper height to US specs. Once one moved the spacers from the top of the struts, the car was lowered 3/4" and handling was improved a bit.

BMW being BMW, the spacer was an elaborate cast aluminum piece with lightening reliefs...
 
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