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having met some of the players from the "other guys" I really really feel they just don't get it! It's going to require some churn among the established players to bring in some "new blood" that understands where this stuff needs to go (former BMW CEO is looking for job these days partly due to his opinion about EV's)…they simply do not get it and they are toooooo beholden to their existing business models to really embrace the radical change required - Blockbuster meet Netflix…it really comes down to that!
I agree with what you're saying, but timing is everything. If Netflix was providing a streaming service in 1998 as their business model, they would fail because the data infrastructure wasn't there. Similarly, an EV company trying to be successful before batteries are affordable would be a mistake. Perhaps we're on near that breaking point, but getting that timing right is nearly impossible to predict.
 

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The secret is looking at the tow strap in the Ford video. It's a 3-4" strap with a maximum load of about 30,000 pounds. There is no safety cable or other restraint should the strap break. The film crew walks along the towing path with no concern. That means the pulling load is much less than 30,000 pounds. (For those who have snapped a winch cable under load, you will understand why the Ford video is well within the safe limit.)

Yep, the feat looks impressive but that's it. It'll be more interesting to see what the tow rating will be as that will bring in many more factors.


The above has a few weak points in failing to consider the front-rear loading of the vehicle; the front tires will proabaly break free at ˜900 pounds due to weight distribution. But two Bolts may do it!

Just turn them around and put them in reverse for some 'rear' traction.
 

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this is really no surprise - Diesel Electric locomotives use that technology for a reason - it's well understood electric motors are great for high torque requirements - it was a snow job that car makers and oil producers some how got it in people's brains that electric motors are weak and slow...it took Tesla to remind people with actual products that electric motors are actually amazing power-tools far outstripping what is possible with ICE motors.

for anything that matters (performance and reliability and power/torque) you use EV motors for the actual "motion" and ICE motors to provide electricity for the EV motor…it's super efficient and leverage the advantages of both types of system (ICE Motors running on an energy dense and highly portable and available fuel) and EV motors that do not stall and have very very high power/torque…
It should also be mentioned it is very difficult to efficiently couple high torque ICE directly to driven wheels and vary the speed; large diesel ICEs have a very narrow operating range of only a few hundred RPM, but locomotive wheels and ship propellers need a very wide rotational speed range. OTOH, it's very easy and very efficient to directly couple electric motors and vary the speed over several thousand RPM.

jack vines
 

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Ford has had electric trucks built by outside contractors at least twice before. They always bail and leave the owners with an orphan truck.
As I said...zero interest in actually building EVs.

 

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Ford also has a lot of experience now with aluminum manufacturing on the current F-150. That will help with their EV development. I'm amazed how far American auto OEMs have come. This Bolt is the first GM I have ever owned. I never thought I would own a US car built in America, but US companies are really starting to out innovate Asian OEMs. Cadillac super cruise, for example, is the most advanced system available in the US today (actually superior to Tesla).

I also see no reason why GM or Ford can't smoothly transition to electric. It's not such a huge leap to change powerplants. The basic business model and manufacturing techniques remain the same. The real issue is that GM has to make a profit, so they aren't going to be out in front selling $55K Tesla Model 3 cars for $35K. Once costs come down, they will eat the competition.
 
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