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Since I have my Bolt now I am looking at the other gas thing in the garage - the lawnmower. I then look at fancy Level 2 charger on the wall. Does anyone have experience with electric ( battery ) lawnmowers? Do any charge with a J1772 adapter or plug into a 240V Nema 14-50 outlet?
 

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Since I have my Bolt now I am looking at the other gas thing in the garage - the lawnmower. I then look at fancy Level 2 charger on the wall. Does anyone have experience with electric ( battery ) lawnmowers? Do any charge with a J1772 adapter or plug into a 240V Nema 14-50 outlet?
Just bought a battery chain saw, it uses standard 120V outlet for charging, much like cordless screwdrivers, saws, etc. Mine is EGO, they also make lawn mowers that use the same battery pack.

If you have a larger yard, it might make sense to get an extra battery pack.
 

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Are we talking push or riding? Plenty of options on push mowers with removable packs that make quick charging pretty unnecessary. Riding mowers are still pretty new, as far as easy to find big-box options. As of now they use lead acid batteries and charge on 120v. Very mixed reviews with some saying the non-replaceable batteries don't last more than a couple of seasons.

As far as L2, at least right now these things only have 1-1.5 kWh batteries in them so there's no reason. They can't reasonably charge faster than 1c and you can get that from 120v.
 

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Since I have my Bolt now I am looking at the other gas thing in the garage - the lawnmower. I then look at fancy Level 2 charger on the wall. Does anyone have experience with electric ( battery ) lawnmowers? Do any charge with a J1772 adapter or plug into a 240V Nema 14-50 outlet?
I have 4 of them, including a Ryobi electric zero turn rider. The smallest one uses Ryobi 40V batteries. The others (a 48V Ryobi and a 36V Black and Decker) have their own lead acid battery systems with their own separate chargers. The Ryobi Zero turn actually uses a 48V golf cart charger to recharge the batteries. All charging systems for all 4 units are 120V.

Gas outdoor equipment is the bane of my existence. I'm trying diligently to get rid of them. Weed trimmers, chainsaw, hedge trimmers, and blower are all electric. The reason is simple: they just work. No clogged carbs. No gas additive. No keeping gas in the garage. Pull it out, start it up. Works almost every time.

If I could get rid of my gas generator, I'd be done.

ga2500ev
 

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I have an 80V self-propelled Ryobi mower. The battery takes about 45 minutes to charge on a 120V outlet, and will easily last an hour or more. Get two batteries, and you can run for as long as you need to.
 

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I have an Ego, available at any Lowe's. It is walk behind, but self propelled. Has replaceable/interchangeable lithium pack that runs for about two hours with constant use. We usually use only about half the battery for a very large backyard. It has its own drop in charger at 120v.and fully charges in an hour.
 

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I have an EGO mower as well. Love it. It is my 3rd EM. Prior EMs used 12v UPS batteries. Buy the self propelled EGO even if you will not use the feature. It costs ~$100 more but the battery it comes with costs twice as much as the non self propelled and us 50% bigger or so. Also have an EGO blower, trimmer and chainsaw. All are very good. They even have commercial products with backpack mounted batteries.
 

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For larger area coverage you want extra battery packs, not faster charging.
I've never, ever trusted proprietary battery formats to be around for very long, so I always buy an extra battery to hold onto for when the first one just doesn't hold a charge any more.
 

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This will be the fifth year for our Greenworks 21", 80 volt push mower. It replaced our 21" gas push mower.


It is much quieter, doesn't vibrate or stink, and never fails to start. The 288 Wh battery has plenty of juice to cut our acre of grass. I sharpen the blade each spring. The battery also fits our weed whip. We got it after trying our neighbor's He was using it to cut a three acre lawn. After a couple years, his wife surprised him with a Ryobi riding mower.


He uses it every week to mow his four hole golf course yard, plus bush hogging his fields.

No ICE vehicles or equipment since 2017. No more gas can, oil drain pan, plug wrenches, filter wrenches, etc.
 

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I've never, ever trusted proprietary battery formats to be around for very long, so I always buy an extra battery to hold onto for when the first one just doesn't hold a charge any more.
Be sure to store that pack around 40% SOC.

I've had my Ryobi 18v stuff for many, many years. My high capacity pack finally died and I was dreading spending the money on another one. I was nicely surprised to find that not only has the price dropped dramatically but the same physical size replacement pack now has significantly more capacity. And cheap knock-offs were readily available. I got a knock-off and took it apart to adjust the latch pressure to my liking. The knock-off has none of the internal cell support or shock absorption that the older stock pack had. I'll probably go name-brand next time.
 

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Back in 2005 I bought a Friendly Robotics lawnmower (Roomba for the lawn). It uses lead acid batteries, and would occasionally cut its own perimeter wire, so I gave up on it. I now use a battery powered push mower and plug in SnowJoe for winter. I bought them so my petite wife can't get out of doing her fair share.
 

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Be sure to store that pack around 40% SOC.

I've had my Ryobi 18v stuff for many, many years. My high capacity pack finally died and I was dreading spending the money on another one. I was nicely surprised to find that not only has the price dropped dramatically but the same physical size replacement pack now has significantly more capacity. And cheap knock-offs were readily available. I got a knock-off and took it apart to adjust the latch pressure to my liking. The knock-off has none of the internal cell support or shock absorption that the older stock pack had. I'll probably go name-brand next time.
Interestingly, EGO batteries will store at 100% SOC for 30 days, then discharge to 30% during a routine maintenance cycle, even if not on the charger.
 

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Interestingly, EGO batteries will store at 100% SOC for 30 days, then discharge to 30% during a routine maintenance cycle, even if not on the charger.
Never heard of that. Would kinda suck if you go to mow your lawn after 30 days and it's at only 30%.
 

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Never heard of that. Would kinda suck if you go to mow your lawn after 30 days and it's at only 30%.
Ya, that would be a problem for me, I tend to only have to mow 2-3x per year. I guess I would have to plug in the night before.

But if it prolongs the battery life, good idea.
 

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I have the Ryobi electric riding mower with the smaller option battery pack, after several seasons it now needs to stop for a re-charge about 2/3 of the way through cutting my lawn. I do mulching which takes significantly more power than just discharging the grass to the side. I also have an EGO self propelled 21" push mower, EGO blower, EGO string trimmer, EGO hedge trimmer, and EGO chain saw.

The Thermal Management System for the EGO batteries is amazing, they pack the battery cells in a phase change material that absorbs heat as it phase changes from solid to liquid. When you charge the battery on the "fast" charger (still 120V) it has a high power fan to remove heat. Some of you who also use EGO products may have wondered why the fan keeps running after the battery shows full, this is because the fan is cooling the phase change material down until it is all solidified again.

As far as I know the lead acid batteries of the Ryobi have no thermal management at all.

Keith
 

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As far as I know the lead acid batteries of the Ryobi have no thermal management at all.
Nope. My neighbor had to get new lead acid batteries last month, after four years. Lead acid is cheap by the Ah, but not by the cycle. If not for COVID, I was going to set him up with lithium ion. Oh well, in four more years.
 
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