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Discussion Starter #1
Watching the challenges faced by drivers in the pre-storm evacuation in Florida, made me think about how it would be different with electric vehicles. The long slow lines of traffic (burn gas at a high rate) and gas stations run out of gas as the demand for gas exceeds both the supply and the ability to bring gasoline in via trucks. With a Bolt, you could certainly charge up before the storm and get 200 miles. There might be long lines to recharge, which of course takes much more time than filling a gas tank. After the storm goes through, if it knocks out electricity, no chance to recharge. Anyway, if in 40 years the dominant personal vehicle is a BEV, evacuations would be different.

Obviously a cursory projection, any thoughts?
 

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South Florida is unique with respect to evacuation in that, if driving, there is only one direction out; and only 2 major highways.

The question becomes complex quickly depending on time to complete a near-full charge and availability of charging sources on route. Also, would need to consider when one makes the decision to evacuate? A week ahead of the potential event, or a day ahead? If an incoming hurricane is moving at 200 miles/day, A Bolt could theoretically outrun it - including charge times - if it had just one day head start.

Edit: Another question is a what water level can an EV drive through before serious damage?
 

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Irma is a unique situation, the storm will be following the path of evacuation and run the entire length of Florida. Miami to Atlanta is 660 miles requiring at least two major recharge stops, or several smaller ones. The recharge infrastructure will certainly be getting a work out.

As far as water level is concerned; it is never a good idea to drive through water of any depth in any car especially if it murky and you can't see the bottom. You never know when there will be a car swallowing hole under there. That being said I would never take an EV into water that was at the running boards and then only very slowly so as not to cause water to surge into the engine compartment.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
South Florida is unique with respect to evacuation in that, if driving, there is only one direction out; and only 2 major highways.

The question becomes complex quickly depending on time to complete a near-full charge and availability of charging sources on route. Also, would need to consider when one makes the decision to evacuate? A week ahead of the potential event, or a day ahead? If an incoming hurricane is moving at 200 miles/day, A Bolt could theoretically outrun it - including charge times - if it had just one day head start.

Edit: Another question is a what water level can an EV drive through before serious damage?
Depth of water, not one I want to experiment with.
 

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No power also = no gas

I actually experienced something similar this past spring in CA.

Heading down to visit friends in the Hollisterr/Gilroy area so did a Turo on an i3 out of San Jose. We were in Morgan Hill for the night, and in the morning I ducked over the the DCFC to top off. Power went out for the whole town (plus a much bigger area) halfway thru. Had enough to make it to our freinds house, but decided to top off at the outlet mall in Gilroy so we could do some sightseeing the following day. Half of the outlet mall had no power, but the Supercharger/DCFC section was good. All the gas stations were coned off - no power = no pumps = no gas for you! Granted, if the power was out at the chargers, there would be less options to refuel , but was kind of fun to cruise past. Lots of flooded roads and downed trees and I didn't test how deep the i3 would manage :).
 
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