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I have very little confidence that GM/LG will be able to fix the manufacturing problem, then produce 140,000 new battery packs, then get them installed in everyone's car in a timely fashion. It's a process that would take many years. Customers can not wait many years with a car that only has a range of 110 miles.

So once again, GM is not being forthcoming. First they try the software scam that they knew would not work. Now they are trying to tell us they will replace batteries but they have not announced a credible plan to make that happen.

It's all just another stall tactic while they negotiate with LG to see who is going to pay for our buyouts.

The way I see this playing out is that GM will announce that LG has solved the problem and we should all trust them to do battery replacements. But they won't announce how soon those replacements will happen. Like the Hyundai battery recall, the replacements will start to trickle out without any visibility as to when individual customers will get their turn. Again, this is just another stalling tactic while they pray that the new batteries don't catch on fire and they delay having to do buyouts.

Eventually, it will become apparent that the battery replacement plan is not working. Lawsuits gain momentum. At that point, customers are given an offer that they can either continue to wait or get a buyback. Buyouts happen for those willing to accept a non-negotiable offer from GM.

All this is far from "doing the right thing".
I think you're wrong.

Are you going to sell your Bolt? You keep talking about the danger, sell it and you wouldn't have to worry, and could get some sleep.
 

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I have very little confidence that GM/LG will be able to fix the manufacturing problem, then produce 140,000 new battery packs, then get them installed in everyone's car in a timely fashion. It's a process that would take many years. Customers can not wait many years with a car that only has a range of 110 miles.

So once again, GM is not being forthcoming. First they try the software scam that they knew would not work. Now they are trying to tell us they will replace batteries but they have not announced a credible plan to make that happen.

It's all just another stall tactic while they negotiate with LG to see who is going to pay for our buyouts.

The way I see this playing out is that GM will announce that LG has solved the problem and we should all trust them to do battery replacements. But they won't announce how soon those replacements will happen. Like the Hyundai battery recall, the replacements will start to trickle out without any visibility as to when individual customers will get their turn. Again, this is just another stalling tactic while they pray that the new batteries don't catch on fire and they delay having to do buyouts.

Eventually, it will become apparent that the battery replacement plan is not working. Lawsuits gain momentum. At that point, customers are given an offer that they can either continue to wait or get a buyback. Buyouts happen for those willing to accept a non-negotiable offer from GM.

All this is far from "doing the right thing".
It appears there are four primary customer archetypes emerging from this.
1) The "Que Sera Sera" customer, who is patiently sitting back, waiting for what comes next, and not getting particularly stressed about it. (Here's looking at you, Shrox)
2) The "Not happy, but I understand" customer, who is getting impatient, but willing to wait around to see what comes next. These are the customers who are willing to wait, just not forever.
3) The "I'm done here" customer who simply wants out of the vehicle. They either cannot live with the limitations, or simply would prefer to move into something that will not come with the extra baggage a Bolt currently carries.
4) The "Life sucks and then you die" customer, who has become so jaded that they cannot see anything other than the ways GM is trying to screw them. These are the people who believe GM's only motivation is self serving. (This archetype seems to be growing).

So I ask you, Usain, what SHOULD GM be doing right now?
 

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It appears there are four primary customer archetypes emerging from this.
1) The "Que Sera Sera" customer, who is patiently sitting back, waiting for what comes next, and not getting particularly stressed about it. (Here's looking at you, Shrox)
2) The "Not happy, but I understand" customer, who is getting impatient, but willing to wait around to see what comes next. These are the customers who are willing to wait, just not forever.
3) The "I'm done here" customer who simply wants out of the vehicle. They either cannot live with the limitations, or simply would prefer to move into something that will not come with the extra baggage a Bolt currently carries.
4) The "Life sucks and then you die" customer, who has become so jaded that they cannot see anything other than the ways GM is trying to screw them. These are the people who believe GM's only motivation is self serving. (This archetype seems to be growing).

So I ask you, Usain, what SHOULD GM be doing right now?
I'm one of those customers not particularly disturbed about this but it's not a tough question for GM to answer.
What progress have you made with respect to batteries and replacement?
Also how generous are your buy backs? Are you giving customers close to what they paid you and shown loyalty to your brand?
 

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Eventually, it will become apparent that the battery replacement plan is not working. Lawsuits gain momentum. At that point, customers are given an offer that they can either continue to wait or get a buyback. Buyouts happen for those willing to accept a non-negotiable offer from GM.

All this is far from "doing the right thing".
I think the continuation of fires prevents this from being a realistic scenario. Whether it is due to PR or the NHTSA, I do not think GM will be content or allowed to let bolts continue to burn while they play out a waiting game strategy. Certainly not while simultaneously trying to sell Hummers
 

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I think you're wrong.

Are you going to sell your Bolt? You keep talking about the danger, sell it and you wouldn't have to worry, and could get some sleep.
I don't think I've talked about the danger at all. Maybe you have me mixed up with someone else?

I'm actually in pretty good shape. I don't mind parking outside after charging and I have a Tesla for long trips. But not everyone can afford to be so patient.
 

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1) The "Que Sera Sera" customer, who is patiently sitting back, waiting for what comes next, and not getting particularly stressed about it. (Here's looking at you, Shrox)
I've seen an unusual amount of felgercarb and glory beans over the years, definitely some wild and improbable stuff. That's where my assessment of risk in life comes from. Of course, with my friends I was always the one that didn't get arrested, weighing and assessing individual situations is important as well.
I've learned a lot too, like being covered in baby oil makes it hard for authorities to catch you.
 

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I don't think I've talked about the danger at all. Maybe you have me mixed up with someone else?

I'm actually in pretty good shape. I don't mind parking outside after charging and I have a Tesla for long trips. But not everyone can afford to be so patient.
Well then you're set! Stop complaining and take us all out for ice cream! I won't spill any, is it leather seats?
 

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It appears there are four primary customer archetypes emerging from this.
1) The "Que Sera Sera" customer, who is patiently sitting back, waiting for what comes next, and not getting particularly stressed about it. (Here's looking at you, Shrox)
2) The "Not happy, but I understand" customer, who is getting impatient, but willing to wait around to see what comes next. These are the customers who are willing to wait, just not forever.
3) The "I'm done here" customer who simply wants out of the vehicle. They either cannot live with the limitations, or simply would prefer to move into something that will not come with the extra baggage a Bolt currently carries.
4) The "Life sucks and then you die" customer, who has become so jaded that they cannot see anything other than the ways GM is trying to screw them. These are the people who believe GM's only motivation is self serving. (This archetype seems to be growing).

So I ask you, Usain, what SHOULD GM be doing right now?
I'm probably in the second group.

What GM should have done was to stop production as soon as they knew there was a problem. Then find the cause of the problem and make sure that it could not occur on newer Bolts. They didn't do that.

Instead, they tried the software scam and told us there was no way this could happen on newer Bolts. They knew that there was a high probability that the software would not work. They also knew there was a decent probability that new Bolts had the same issue, because at that point they didn't really know the cause.

As soon as they realized how hard it was to remedy the problem, they should have started offering buybacks to anybody who wanted one. Just bring your car into a dealer and get cash on the spot. It didn't have to be a generous buyback. Just something that makes the customer whole.

Eventually, that's what GM will do anyway, but the process will take many years.
 

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I think the continuation of fires prevents this from being a realistic scenario. Whether it is due to PR or the NHTSA, I do not think GM will be content or allowed to let bolts continue to burn while they play out a waiting game strategy. Certainly not while simultaneously trying to sell Hummers
Yes, there is a limit to how long the delay tactics can last. And more fires will definitely speed things along.
 

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I'm one of those customers not particularly disturbed about this but it's not a tough question for GM to answer.
What progress have you made with respect to batteries and replacement?
Also how generous are your buy backs? Are you giving customers close to what they paid you and shown loyalty to your brand?
It appears there are four primary customer archetypes emerging from this.
1) The "Que Sera Sera" customer, who is patiently sitting back, waiting for what comes next, and not getting particularly stressed about it. (Here's looking at you, Shrox)
2) The "Not happy, but I understand" customer, who is getting impatient, but willing to wait around to see what comes next. These are the customers who are willing to wait, just not forever.
3) The "I'm done here" customer who simply wants out of the vehicle. They either cannot live with the limitations, or simply would prefer to move into something that will not come with the extra baggage a Bolt currently carries.
4) The "Life sucks and then you die" customer, who has become so jaded that they cannot see anything other than the ways GM is trying to screw them. These are the people who believe GM's only motivation is self serving. (This archetype seems to be growing).

So I ask you, Usain, what SHOULD GM be doing right now?
I was initially in group #1 with the 2017, then slid into #2 after initial buyback to a 2021. I was briefly in group #2, but as soon as it dawned on me that there's no clear end in sight, I'm now squarely in group #3, hoping they take this 2021 back as well.
 

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I was initially in group #1 with the 2017, then slid into #2 after initial buyback to a 2021. I was briefly in group #2, but as soon as it dawned on me that there's no clear end in sight, I'm now squarely in group #3, hoping they take this 2021 back as well.
It is hard to blame anyone for feeling how they do about this situation. It is pretty crappy all around.

I for one do not believe GM had nefarious intentions to simply delay as long as they can. They are over one heckuva barrel, though. I don't think it matters how hard they try, this recall is going to take a very long time to clean up.
 

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3) The "I'm done here" customer who simply wants out of the vehicle. They either cannot live with the limitations, or simply would prefer to move into something that will not come with the extra baggage a Bolt currently carries.
Kinda, sorta. I mostly changed my mind about keeping a car 15+ years and realize that there are or will soon be better options for what I want. And since I decided not to keep the car long term, I think depreciation will be great in a few years and I want to avoid that hit so I'm attempting a buyback. Plus... I'm not really happy with the car.
 

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It is hard to blame anyone for feeling how they do about this situation. It is pretty crappy all around.

I for one do not believe GM had nefarious intentions to simply delay as long as they can. They are over one heckuva barrel, though. I don't think it matters how hard they try, this recall is going to take a very long time to clean up.
I really tried to hold out hope that the time horizon for a remedy would occur sooner rather than later, especially given my particular situation in terms of my job. But again, the only thing that's become more clear in all this is that, as you said, it is likely to take a very long time.

I don't think we'll ever be privy to GM's actual intentions regarding this, but the stopgap measures rolled out previously (ie, pushing software updates as a definitive fix) in hindsight would be pretty hard to deny was, at least in part, a method to delay the physical recall.
 

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GM has not handled this like Tylenol.
True, although they aren't exactly the same.
They should have immediately stopped selling the Bolt and made some serious concessions to existing customers.
Hindsight is 20/20. ;-)
One of the key differences is that in the Tylenol case, they were very quickly able to identify not only what the problem was, but also that it wasn't factory tampering.
That makes the handling of this very different.
GM did not yet have all the information. They are still waiting for "good" batteries from LG...
If GM had handled this like Tylenol they would have come out of it with even more consumer confidence in the brand.
I still think that is possible, and there are some similarities to Tylenol in that...
In the Tylenol case, it wasn't the company that was at fault.
I think, if LG gets this addressed before too long (not a given), then GM will largely get a pass.
It will have been an LG issue. GM will have replaced batteries and bought back a lot of cars.
People will look back and think:
Hey, could have been worse... What's the best deal I can get on this car!!!

The public has been shown to have a very short memory when it comes to these kind of things at times...
 

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It is hard to blame anyone for feeling how they do about this situation. It is pretty crappy all around.

I for one do not believe GM had nefarious intentions to simply delay as long as they can. They are over one heckuva barrel, though. I don't think it matters how hard they try, this recall is going to take a very long time to clean up.
I don't think it was nefarious either. They handled it like the other automakers handle these things. That is, badly.

They should have taken the Tylenol approach which would have served them better in the long run.
 

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I don't suppose there's any definitive word on this question: How will GM handle the Bolt recall/buyback for 2nd owners (not original purchaser)?

I would consider purchasing another 2020+ Bolt for the right price. Preferably in the Pacific Northwest. Anybody interested?
 

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As a more pertinent support question, one would need to consider the support of spare parts. In my search I keep finding that parts are supposed to be produced for a period of 7 to 10 years after a vehicle is discontinued. In regards to an EV this puts the battery at risk. Especially if the chemistry changes and is not compatible with the power management system, as others on this site have eluded. Many have commented that Ultium batt will not be Bolt compatible. Let’s say in 10 years my batt performance has degraded to a point that I would need a new batt. Would I have an option? Would I have a reasonable cost option? Will GM licence the tech to an aftermarket. Fire issues aside, I don’t want to end up with a car that is still in good condition but I can’t get a battery, similar to my old iPhone. Do any have knowledge of spare parts laws? Canada / US?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I don't think we'll ever be privy to GM's actual intentions regarding this, but the stopgap measures rolled out previously (ie, pushing software updates as a definitive fix) in hindsight would be pretty hard to deny was, at least in part, a method to delay the physical recall.
I would love to get behind the scenes to see how hard LG pushed for the software attempt prior to physically recalling them. I also want to know exactly how much knowledge GM had of what specifically was wrong prior to the software recall. All we can do is speculate. But based on how it was handled, I cannot help but think GM did not have a full understanding of what was mechanically wrong until after they started tearing down batteries that were flagged by the software recall.
 
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