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Yeesh, $80 oil changes... most I've paid might have been $22, but that was years ago. Never did synthetic though, so I know that can be very expensive. I do my own with synthetic and materials cost is probably $20.

Your degradation looks normal based on what others have shared here. Somewhere around 1% per 10k miles.
 

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It's hard to get away from synthetics if you want to make your power train warranty rock solid. Some automakers even have "certified" oils. My VWs I'd go out and buy specifically vw 503 spec cause that's what the engineers said in the manual. Would feel pretty stupid if I blew my $8,000, high oil burning turbo motor'd engine because I decided to save a few bucks on an inferior product.

If I get over 4,000 lbs I'm not even gonna bother changing my own winter wheels anymore.

It's no longer a world where you own a car, the cars own you. Nothing I can do about it.
VW is the only manufacturer I know that has issues with certain oils.

All other manufacturers allow conventional motor oil that meets whatever certification specified. Nobody is going to lose a warranty claim because they used conventional oil rather than synthetic. Not only that, but a properly maintained engine should not fail within the warranty period, and if it does, indicates a likely defect in manufacturing.
 

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I use synthetic too since as you say, the marginal cost isn't much. I buy it in bulk when on super sale; usually Mobile 1, but I'll use any synthetic. Since I only change once per year, I like an oil that maintains its properties for longer.

I used to send in oil samples for analysis to Blackstone, just because I was curious and I wanted to provide a datapoint for curious internet lurkers. They always said I could put more miles on the oil, even at 13,000 miles between changes.
 

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Yeah, I think my pure ICE days are over. At minimum, I'm going to want a plug-in hybrid.

There's a freeze on vehicle replacements at my company, and the Mazda CX-5 would normally be up for replacement being 4 years old. Supposedly there is a major change to the menu due this summer with an emphasis on hybrids and EVs. Will be interesting to see what's offered.

The company pays for all fuel though, so there's some disincentive to go EV since they don't reimburse any electricity. However, they do offer a 1-time $2k reimbursement for EVSE installation.
 

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The $2k reimbursement for the EVSE has value beyond fuel reimbursement. It adds functionality and value to your home, could be used for other vehicles, and could facilitate future savings (as you shift away from ICE vehicles towards EVs).

It's like a work from home arrangement, where you get an allowance for furniture / equipment. You still have to pay all the utility costs for your "workplace" instead of your employer, but you get some nice stuff in your house on the company's dime.

Would the electricity for your EV be tax-deductible if your EV is for work?
All true, but the value of an EVSE installation isn't much to me since I know how to run a circuit and it would be simple in my garage. It's worth the cost of the EVSE to me, plus about $70 in materials. I'd probably still take advantage of the offer.

I can expense charging at DCFC when on a business trip, so that's not a big deal. Currently I get personal use of the car and they pay for the fuel, which is what I would be losing.

That said, I'm highly inclined toward an EV, especially since I have solar to offset my electricity usage.
 

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Here in Québec, it is required that the electrical work to be carried out by an electrical contractor licensed by Régie du Bâtiment du Québec. You can't do it by yourself. And this comes with a price, sometimes a large one.
I think we can do our own work, but require an electrician to certify it. My nature is more to follow the spirit of the law than the letter. Rules exist for the wicked and the ignorant.

Installed a 14-50r at my previous house to code, but without permission. Let's hear all those comments about insurance denying the claim now.
 

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I think most play by the rules to avoid the back&forth with insurance companies. It's time and money thrown through the window.
Unless the installation that you put in place is not according to the code, then you are on the hook. Not before.
I'm on the hook for not getting a permit, whatever that is. Nobody is inspecting my house though, so not a problem.

I don't even know how anyone would know what was permitted and what wasn't. Is there a record of every circuit installed in my home?
 

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Mini-rant inspired by this discussion...

I'm not saying there's no value in having regulatory bodies and permitting processes, but what good do they actually do?

Those willing to forego the permitting and DIY aren't stopped by the fact that there's a rule that says you need to jump through the hoops. That danger isn't mitigated then.

All of the really bad workmanship is due to the fact that people wanted to cut corners, including the permitting process. Those that are motivated to do things correctly are also likely to go through the permitting hoops, somewhat diminishing the value of the permitting process.

I'm sure inspection has prevented fires before by catching something like 14 AWG wire connected to a 50 amp breaker, but other than something like that, there's quite low risk of creating a huge safety issue.
 
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