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Yeah, I think my pure ICE days are over. At minimum, I'm going to want a plug-in hybrid.

There's a freeze on vehicle replacements at my company, and the Mazda CX-5 would normally be up for replacement being 4 years old. Supposedly there is a major change to the menu due this summer with an emphasis on hybrids and EVs. Will be interesting to see what's offered.

The company pays for all fuel though, so there's some disincentive to go EV since they don't reimburse any electricity. However, they do offer a 1-time $2k reimbursement for EVSE installation.
I've always liked the CX-5, coming from a 2001 Miata, and then 2006 Mazda 3. Sticks of course. The CX-5 is more sporting than the typical small "ute".
 

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...The company pays for all fuel though, so there's some disincentive to go EV since they don't reimburse any electricity. However, they do offer a 1-time $2k reimbursement for EVSE installation.
The $2k reimbursement for the EVSE has value beyond fuel reimbursement. It adds functionality and value to your home, could be used for other vehicles, and could facilitate future savings (as you shift away from ICE vehicles towards EVs).

It's like a work from home arrangement, where you get an allowance for furniture / equipment. You still have to pay all the utility costs for your "workplace" instead of your employer, but you get some nice stuff in your house on the company's dime.

Would the electricity for your EV be tax-deductible if your EV is for work?
 

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The $2k reimbursement for the EVSE has value beyond fuel reimbursement. It adds functionality and value to your home, could be used for other vehicles, and could facilitate future savings (as you shift away from ICE vehicles towards EVs).

It's like a work from home arrangement, where you get an allowance for furniture / equipment. You still have to pay all the utility costs for your "workplace" instead of your employer, but you get some nice stuff in your house on the company's dime.

Would the electricity for your EV be tax-deductible if your EV is for work?
All true, but the value of an EVSE installation isn't much to me since I know how to run a circuit and it would be simple in my garage. It's worth the cost of the EVSE to me, plus about $70 in materials. I'd probably still take advantage of the offer.

I can expense charging at DCFC when on a business trip, so that's not a big deal. Currently I get personal use of the car and they pay for the fuel, which is what I would be losing.

That said, I'm highly inclined toward an EV, especially since I have solar to offset my electricity usage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I spend about 4 days a month in Galveston the rest of the time I'm in the Texas hill country. I try to wash the car soon after returning from Galveston. There is no salt or sand in the hill country. So far I have noted no effects on the salt and sand.

My utility here is a coop. While they offer time of use, the delta is very small and does not appear to be worth the trouble. The problem is they vary the cost of the power but not the cost of delivery. The coops calculator shows that TOU would have cost me more last year.
 

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All true, but the value of an EVSE installation isn't much to me since I know how to run a circuit and it would be simple in my garage. It's worth the cost of the EVSE to me, plus about $70 in materials. I'd probably still take advantage of the offer.

I can expense charging at DCFC when on a business trip, so that's not a big deal. Currently I get personal use of the car and they pay for the fuel, which is what I would be losing.

That said, I'm highly inclined toward an EV, especially since I have solar to offset my electricity usage.
Here in Québec, it is required that the electrical work to be carried out by an electrical contractor licensed by Régie du Bâtiment du Québec. You can't do it by yourself. And this comes with a price, sometimes a large one.
 

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Now for the numbers: I burned through 10112 kWh of electricity. Getting an average of 3.7 miles per kWh. The total cost was $1189 or about 3.1 cents per mile.
With those kind of distances, tire costs are going to start being a significant contributor. Those plus insurance will probably exceed your 'fuel' costs.

My estimate is that if I had driven the same amount in my Miata (which gets about 28 miles per gallon on the interstate) it would have cost me $3900. So I saved about $2700 on the cost of fuel. There were no other maintenance costs on the Bolt. In the almost 34,000 miles the Miata would have needed about 7 oil changes for a cost of about $560. For a total savings of $3260.
Those estimates may have made sense for last year, but at this point, they sound way low. 34k miles at 28mpg =~ 1200 gallons. Texas average right now for regular is just under $4. Even assuming $3.75 average, that's $4500 right there.

Also a smaller item, but Miatas consume brakes at a much faster rate than Bolts do...
 

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Here in Québec, it is required that the electrical work to be carried out by an electrical contractor licensed by Régie du Bâtiment du Québec. You can't do it by yourself. And this comes with a price, sometimes a large one.
I think we can do our own work, but require an electrician to certify it. My nature is more to follow the spirit of the law than the letter. Rules exist for the wicked and the ignorant.

Installed a 14-50r at my previous house to code, but without permission. Let's hear all those comments about insurance denying the claim now.
 

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Installed a 14-50r at my previous house to code, but without permission. Let's hear all those comments about insurance denying the claim now.
I think most play by the rules to avoid the back&forth with insurance companies. It's time and money thrown through the window.
Unless the installation that you put in place is not according to the code, then you are on the hook. Not before.
 

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I think most play by the rules to avoid the back&forth with insurance companies. It's time and money thrown through the window.
Unless the installation that you put in place is not according to the code, then you are on the hook. Not before.
If you don't tell your utility then they don't have any liability and they're happy as clams. On several occasions I've discussed with the engineering dept. of our electric coop about ways I might accomplish a task like improving the voltage at an elevator, but I never tell them what I'm going to do or even that I'm going to do anything. We just talk about issues. The coop asked me to charge the Bolt between 9pm and 5am because they pay less during those hours, and I do that even though I pay the same regardless. Cooperation is a two way street.

By the way, if you don't thoroughly understand what you're doing, and have experience, then hire an electrician.
 

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I think most play by the rules to avoid the back&forth with insurance companies. It's time and money thrown through the window.
Unless the installation that you put in place is not according to the code, then you are on the hook. Not before.
I'm on the hook for not getting a permit, whatever that is. Nobody is inspecting my house though, so not a problem.

I don't even know how anyone would know what was permitted and what wasn't. Is there a record of every circuit installed in my home?
 

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I don't even know how anyone would know what was permitted and what wasn't. Is there a record of every circuit installed in my home?
Nope. I converted a devoted circuit to 240 VAC and got a permit for 2 reasons. #1: It's an old house but has recent completely updated electric so my add-on would stand out as unpermitted work. #2: Experience. I find experience to be worth something and felt that the permit fee was worth it.

I did all my research. Installed the 240 VAC GFCI breaker. Properly marked the white wire red. Added junction boxes in the attic with properly marked wires. Ran individual wires in conduit (romex in conduit is common mistake). Used weatherproof outlet outside. I was kinda looking forward to showing the inspector that a DIY guy would do it correctly. Inspector showed up, looked at the outlet and looked at the front panel of the breaker box and signed off the permit. I was a little disappointed.
 

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Nope. I converted a devoted circuit to 240 VAC and got a permit for 2 reasons. #1: It's an old house but has recent completely updated electric so my add-on would stand out as unpermitted work. #2: Experience. I find experience to be worth something and felt that the permit fee was worth it.

I did all my research. Installed the 240 VAC GFCI breaker. Properly marked the white wire red. Added junction boxes in the attic with properly marked wires. Ran individual wires in conduit (romex in conduit is common mistake). Used weatherproof outlet outside. I was kinda looking forward to showing the inspector that a DIY guy would do it correctly. Inspector showed up, looked at the outlet and looked at the front panel of the breaker box and signed off the permit. I was a little disappointed.
So basically you could have done the whole job with bell wire.😃
 

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I'm on the hook for not getting a permit, whatever that is. Nobody is inspecting my house though, so not a problem.

I don't even know how anyone would know what was permitted and what wasn't. Is there a record of every circuit installed in my home?
There's no record of individual circuits. Lots of people add circuits on their own. When I lived in Kennewick I added a circuit to run a new heat pump. Since I had a contractor install the heat pump, an inspector from the city came to inspect the installation but didn't pay any attention to the wiring.

In Kennewick there's a law that you need to get a permit to replace a water heater. Needless to say, vast numbers of people install their water heaters in blissful ignorance of the law. The only reason I know about the law is that there was a fight on the city council and one of the antagonists turned in another for violating the law and it came out that no one had ever been fined for violating that law.

We don't live in China. Nobody's running around making sure that every law is followed just for the sake of following law. Contractors or unions might get some laws passed to help business but mostly it's about liability if something goes wrong. Contractors have to be inspected because they have an incentive to cut corners and don't suffer the consequences if there's a problem. Homeowners have plenty of incentive to do what's right without laws.
 

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Mini-rant inspired by this discussion...

I'm not saying there's no value in having regulatory bodies and permitting processes, but what good do they actually do?

Those willing to forego the permitting and DIY aren't stopped by the fact that there's a rule that says you need to jump through the hoops. That danger isn't mitigated then.

All of the really bad workmanship is due to the fact that people wanted to cut corners, including the permitting process. Those that are motivated to do things correctly are also likely to go through the permitting hoops, somewhat diminishing the value of the permitting process.

I'm sure inspection has prevented fires before by catching something like 14 AWG wire connected to a 50 amp breaker, but other than something like that, there's quite low risk of creating a huge safety issue.
 

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Yeah, I'm not surprised. Never been there and will never go there. I just have the sense that the governments there harass people for no reason, and for nefarious reasons. Here, even in the People's Republic of Washington State, the principal is to leave people alone, especially in their homes, unless there is a **** good reason. It's part of our culture, thank god.
 

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Mini-rant inspired by this discussion...

I'm not saying there's no value in having regulatory bodies and permitting processes, but what good do they actually do?

Those willing to forego the permitting and DIY aren't stopped by the fact that there's a rule that says you need to jump through the hoops. That danger isn't mitigated then.

All of the really bad workmanship is due to the fact that people wanted to cut corners, including the permitting process. Those that are motivated to do things correctly are also likely to go through the permitting hoops, somewhat diminishing the value of the permitting process.

I'm sure inspection has prevented fires before by catching something like 14 AWG wire connected to a 50 amp breaker, but other than something like that, there's quite low risk of creating a huge safety issue.
Might come in handy when purchasing a property. If no permits were pulled for obvious work done, that tells you that you should at least look more closely at what you're buying, and be suspicious of the things you can't see inside the walls.
 
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