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Hi all. Never been much of a lover of eMPG as it does not take into account relative costs of the fuels. So I came up with a way to compare my EV mpg with my ICE mpg.
To get a direct comparison, I asked how many miles can I drive my Bolt for the same cost as a gallon of gas.
Calculation goes like this.
Current gas price here in Texas is $2.499 per Gallon.
current off peak cost of 1 KW of electricity is 6.93 Cents.
my juicebox L2 Charging Efficiency is averaging 93%.
my current lifetime Miles per KW is 4.32.
Therefore, EV equivalent Mpg = 2.499/0.0693*93%*4.32
Which equals 144.9 e$mpg.
My current lifetime e$mpg is 110.3 e$mpg over 5700 Miles.
Would be interested to know what sort of e$mpg others are getting.
Tobyjug
 

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I buy 100% local (non-TX) wind power, for 14.5 cents/kWh flat rate.

And we are running 3.7 mi/kWh (in colder weather).

Looks like I am running a bit under half of your figure for the same price of gas.

But my other car only gets 24 mpg.
 

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I was so amazed at the economy of my Bolt in warmer temperatures the past couple of days here in Michigan. My kwh rate at home is .144 and my efficiency (bar graph calculation for last 50 miles) is approaching 6 mi/kWh(speeds 0 to 45 mph) which works out to about 110 mpg equivalent when compared to current gas price of $2.899. Granted this is just for 2 days with the heat-a/c button(?) off. This looks much better than the 2.0 to 2.5 mi/ kWh I saw during recent months and much colder temps, although the heat that accompanied it at the time was much appreciated. ��
 

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Hi all. Never been much of a lover of eMPG as it does not take into account relative costs of the fuels.
To be fair, eMPG is like MPG - its intended use is to allow you to compare the efficiency of various vehicles, not to predict how much they'll cost to run.
 

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Best way to compare ICE and EV's is $ per Mile. My SUV gets 23 mpg and gas here is $3.50 which works out to $0.152 per mile. My Bolt has a lifetime average of 3.6 miles per kWh. Taking 10% loss into consideration I am at $0.13 per kWh. This works out to be $0.036 per mile. My miles per kWh used to be higher, but my wife runs heat/air conditioning at full blast and enjoys sport mode a little bit too much...
 

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I just broke it down into cents per mile to operate... at 11cent/kwh my bolt costs 3cents / mile.... at ~$2.40/gallon gas, a 38mpg car costs 5.5 cents, a 25mpg car costs 10cents.
 

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My wife and I occasionally carpool together. The round trip is 100 miles on interstate in NJ.
If we take her Subaru Crosstrek, fuel cost $8.33 ($2.75/gal, 33 mpg).
If we take my Bolt, the cost is apx. $3.75 (4m/Kw x .15/Kw).
NB, my efficiency varies from <2.5 m/Kw in winter to >5 m/Kw in summer.
However, I have not counted frequent deeply discounted or free charging.
 

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Anyone wanting to get to my point, can jump to the very last sentence, in bold letters.


I prefer to look at the "mpg" as cents/mile. The cost will vary depending on your local conditions but since most drive locally, local conditions are what matters to each individual. The OP asked for local information.


First, I live in Central NY (near Syracuse). Gas costs about $3.00/gallon. Our power bills separate the cost of being connected (fixed monthly amount), the incremental cost to deliver electricity, the incremental cost of the electricity and some small baloney charges caused by the government. The fixed amount is just under $20/month and is to cover the cost of maintaining & repairing equipment (downed power lines, etc). The point behind explaining the billing breakdown is to share that the cost of equipment maintenance isn't a component of my kWh rate. Some people have the cost of equipment maintenance buried in their kWh rate. That means it is not an "apples to apples" comparison to compare my rate with the rate elsewhere unless the calculation method is the same in the other location.


Since I have to pay the fixed monthly fee regardless of whether I own and operate an EV, the monthly fee is not a factor in the fuel cost of my Bolt.


Disclaimer -- I'm not going to get exact with my math. Fuzzy math is close enough and is easier to do in my head.



My prior car, a Chevy Cruze, got an actual 30mpg. At $3.00/gallon, that is 10 cents / mile.



As my Bolt is relatively new, I'm still on "regular" electric rate. That means no peak / off peak distinction (yet). I need a new meter, need to be home during a week day (easier said than done), etc. But it will eventually happen.


My current incremental cost for electricity is between 8 and 9 cents / kWh. (That is the sum of the delivery cost and the supply cost plus the government baloney.) My current driving efficiency varies but I drive mostly highway. My (weekday) average is average - 3.9 mi/kWh. Fuzzy math time. 8 to 9 cents becomes 10 cents to also cover charging loss and that 3.9 isn't actually 4. Using 10 cents / kWh and 4mi/kWh makes for easy peasy math. 2.5 cents / mile.


If I drive 100 miles per work day and work 50 weeks / year (which is just about right using fuzzy numbers), the annual weekday fuel cost in the Cruze was (100 * 50 * 5)mi * $0.10/mi = $2500 which clearly was enough money to get my attention. In the Bolt, without tinkering with electric rates (yet), $625. There's a flaw because I have winter driving mpg included for the Cruze but not the Bolt. So, more than $625.


I haven't counted weekends and I haven't tried to do the math. I do know this. My wife has an AWD Equinox which we used to use for most weekend driving. (Different long story that doesn't relate here.) Because electrons cost less than gasoline, I asked my wife to drive the Bolt on weekends unless she needs the cargo space. As a husbandly gesture (which is appreciated), I am the one who puts gas in that car. Used to be once/week with 1/8th (2/16th) tank remaining. Now it's once per week with 7/16th of a tank remaining. (A lot of weekend driving, apparently.) I'm not going to try to do that math. I'm just going to call it "bonus." Seems like a substantial bonus though.


In fuzzy summary, 10 cents/mile in the Cruze becomes about 2.5 cents/mile in the Bolt. 15 cents/mile in the Equinox becomes 2.5 cents/mile in the Bolt.
 

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2021 Sienna LE AWD "Mr. Sparkollz"
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In fuzzy summary, 10 cents/mile in the Cruze becomes about 2.5 cents/mile in the Bolt. 15 cents/mile in the Equinox becomes 2.5 cents/mile in the Bolt.

Your "f-math" looks convincing, but there is a substantial investment that offsets/defers the financial benefits. For starters, you need to buy an EVSE. I bought two (one is portable and travels with me), because I don't want my car rendered temporarily useless if my only EVSE were to malfunction. Then you have to wire it in, which is let's say another grand on average. So we have $1.5k-2K to set up your home charging station.

In my case, since I expect to use opportunistic L2 charging (including those NEMA 14-50 etc. you find at camp grounds and Tesla "destination" chargers) as well as DCFC, I had to invest into 3 different adapters, which added up to $400.00

Then of course charging at commercial EVSE's is more expensive than at home. Typically, I part with $1.50 to add 40-50 miles, which translates into 3-4 cents a mile. If you do DCFC, I remember paying $6.00 (or was it even more?) for the "90 miles" of range … so it's more like 7 cents a mile rather than 2.5. Still very good, though.

Also consider what car you are substituting for, or complementing with your Bolt. My "other" car is a baby Prius, who stretches a $2.70 gallon for 54 miles on average … that's 5 pennies/ mile, so no dramatic difference from the Bolt.
 

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I am past the point where I am playing the miles per kWh game and I am just enjoying my Bolt now. I put the car in L and sport mode, it is exciting to get 0 to 75 mph while merging on the highway. I also crank the air conditioning and drive with traffic going 75 mph. I am now averaging 3.5 miles per kWh instead of the close to 4 I was last year.

With my $0.13 electricity costs I am spending about $0.04 per mile with the Bolt. My Ford Explorer is about $0.16 per mile with our insane gas prices in California compared to the rest of the nation. There is a reason why the Bolt has put on 35,000 miles the past 15 months and the Explorer has about 10,000 miles. The short trip to the grocery store, 8 miles roundtrip, costs about $0.24 in fuel with the Bolt and $1.28 with the 22 mpg Explorer.
 

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Your "f-math" looks convincing, but there is a substantial investment that offsets/defers the financial benefits. For starters, you need to buy an EVSE. I bought two (one is portable and travels with me), because I don't want my car rendered temporarily useless if my only EVSE were to malfunction. Then you have to wire it in, which is let's say another grand on average. So we have $1.5k-2K to set up your home charging station.

In my case, since I expect to use opportunistic L2 charging (including those NEMA 14-50 etc. you find at camp grounds and Tesla "destination" chargers) as well as DCFC, I had to invest into 3 different adapters, which added up to $400.00

Then of course charging at commercial EVSE's is more expensive than at home. Typically, I part with $1.50 to add 40-50 miles, which translates into 3-4 cents a mile. If you do DCFC, I remember paying $6.00 (or was it even more?) for the "90 miles" of range … so it's more like 7 cents a mile rather than 2.5. Still very good, though.

Also consider what car you are substituting for, or complementing with your Bolt. My "other" car is a baby Prius, who stretches a $2.70 gallon for 54 miles on average … that's 5 pennies/ mile, so no dramatic difference from the Bolt.

I agree there are up front costs which should factor into a ROI (rate of investment) analysis. While I did that before my purchase, it seemed outside the theme of the thread. My ROI compared a new Cruze to a new Bolt and assumed the current $3/gal for gasoline and the current electricity rates (gathered from reviewing my actual electric bills over the past year). The one place we part company in the basis for ROI analysis is that I counted the work by the electrician as a capital improvement to my house instead of as an expense. Installation cost me $480. Different people will have different costs and local conditions will affect those. But, as I pointed out, the analysis by an individual should be considered with his local conditions. This seemed to fit with the OP asking what life was like elsewhere in the country.


In any event, I was focusing on operational costs (not initial costs) because that seemed (to me) to be the theme of the thread. Plus, now that my infrastructure is in place, I do encourage my wife to drive the Bolt, instead of the Equinox on weekends. (And she is, right now.) At least that works for summer. We'll see about winter. (I suspect she'll be back in her AWD Equinox once the snow flies even though I will absolutely be getting snow tires. Snow tires made a huge difference on the Cruze.)
 

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The EV chargers are a capital expenditure that will out live the Bolt are are part of the house - while it is an expense its a one time expense and has improved your house’s value for the next buyer.

An EV charger is at least a 10 year life product - so I would change perspective and think about cost per year - $2000 over 10 years is $200/year which isn’t really that much...
 

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it also becomes much harder to attribute cost for the home EV charger once you own more than one EV - which EV is it increasing the cost per-mile of?
 

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The EV chargers are a capital expenditure that will out live the Bolt are are part of the house - while it is an expense its a one time expense and has improved your house’s value for the next buyer.

An EV charger is at least a 10 year life product - so I would change perspective and think about cost per year - $2000 over 10 years is $200/year which isn’t really that much...
The thing is, you have to spend your $$$ now as a lump sum and (maybe) recover the costs years later, in trickle instalments. Also, we don't really know if an extra 50 amp circuit in the garage will be worth anything to a person from the street 10 years from now. Given how fast the tech is developing, maybe in 10 years it will be like an 8-track player in the car.

But even w/o these considerations the cost per mile in an EV is not dramatically lower than in a hybrid.
 

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The thing is, you have to spend your $$$ now as a lump sum and (maybe) recover the costs years later, in trickle instalments. Also, we don't really know if an extra 50 amp circuit in the garage will be worth anything to a person from the street 10 years from now. Given how fast the tech is developing, maybe in 10 years it will be like an 8-track player in the car.

But even w/o these considerations the cost per mile in an EV is not dramatically lower than in a hybrid.
Since I bought my Bolt I have put on over 35,000 miles. My Ford Fusion Hybrid got 35 mpg average on trips. Driving fast on highways every day is not the most efficient way to drive a hybrid or the Bolt, but is is my commute. With California gas prices it would have cost me $3000 for the mileage I put on. With my Bolt it cost me under $2000 for the electricity, EV charger, and installation of my charger. In California a Bolt cost per mile is dramatically lower than a hybrid. Even if I got a hybrid that got 50 mpg, the Bolt would have won with the EV charger over 35,000. However, there is no way i would get 50 mpg the way I drive. Plus the driving experience of the Bolt is a tad better than the Prius. After driving the Bolt i don't think I could own a car that would do 0 to 60 mph in over 10 seconds. Plus with the subsidies in CA, the Bolt is cheaper than a Prius to buy.
 

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I always knew a small EV was the best all-around for our everyday retired driving needs. For three years, I did the fuzzy math, but with paid-for ICEs in the garage, there was no system of logic which would render an EV cost-effective.

As each EV came to market, I test-drove them, but most had deal-breaker drawbacks; Tesla cost and size, early i3 cost and range, Leaf many little things. Finally, the Bolt came available and we bought it just because we wanted an EV and it was an absolute hoot to drive. It's just plain practical fun and the societal benefits are a bonus. There is not yet and probably never will be a net-cost benefit to this Bolt purchase.

jack vines
 

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I always knew a small EV was the best all-around for our everyday retired driving needs. For three years, I did the fuzzy math, but with paid-for ICEs in the garage, there was no system of logic which would render an EV cost-effective.

As each EV came to market, I test-drove them, but most had deal-breaker drawbacks; Tesla cost and size, early i3 cost and range, Leaf many little things. Finally, the Bolt came available and we bought it just because we wanted an EV and it was an absolute hoot to drive. It's just plain practical fun and the societal benefits are a bonus. There is not yet and probably never will be a net-cost benefit to this Bolt purchase.

jack vines
If you replace your vehicles before squeezing every penny out of them, the cost benefit isn't going to look so good no matter what you're buying.

My math looked a bit better as I traded in a 17yo car that Chevy offered $4k for. That number wasn't going to be getting any better. The old car did about 24 mpg, and between fuel costs and maintenance of an old car, I should be saving over $2k/yr with the bolt. Drive it for 10 years and I've saved $20k. If I squeak out a few more years, I'll reclaim the full purchase.

Then maybe it'll be time to test drive a 500 mile range vehicle that charges in an hour.
 

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If you replace your vehicles before squeezing every penny out of them, the cost benefit isn't going to look so good no matter what you're buying.
As far as I'm concerned, the money I saved by hanging on to my camperized Plymouth Voyager over these past 25 years has paid for my Bolt.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it!
 
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