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Hi All, so I have the new 2020 Bolt and its charging on a 120v socket at 12 amps with the stock evse. When I ran the evse at 8 amps I was getting 1 kw per hour.....crazy. Then I tried 12 amps and I got 2 kw per hour which worked out to be around 5 miles per hour. If I got a Evdoubler which takes two 120 connections and makes them into 240v socket what kilowatts would I get per hour for charging? I know it would still be on 12 amps with the stock evse but how much kilowatts and miles would I get per hour? Would it be 4kw and 10 miles per hour? Has any one ever used the Evdoubler with there Bolt?
 

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12A x 240v = 12A X .24Kilovolts = 2.88 Kw rate... for me 2.88 Kw is about 12 miles per hour of range gained. (I get above 4.5 miles per KwH.
 

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In preparation for installing my level 2 charger I installed a NEMA 14-50 outlet to a 50 amp 240 volt breaker. I then made an adapter box so that I could plug in my OEM EVSE and use it on the NEMA 14-50 outlet. That increased my charging rate to between 10 - 12 miles per hour.
 

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Since having a working EVSE is so critical, it would not be a bad idea to buy an after market EVSE and use it along with the OEM EVSE.
 

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Have you first checked to see that you have two reasonably close outlets each on different circuits and legs of your electrical service?
Yeah, these "doubler" plugs don't work if, for example, you just plug both of them into the two outlets of one wall box. You need to find two outlets that are on two different circuits, each of which is connected to a different branch of the 240V feed.
 

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As Sean said you would need two different outlets, each powered from different branches of the 240V feed. That probably means using at least one longer extension cord, assuming one of the outlets is close enough to your car that the EVSE cord will reach. The adapter I built only cost me around $10 in parts. Basically, just a handibox, a 110V outlet, a foot of wire (I used some #8 cable I had left over from wiring my 14-50 outlet to my panel) and a 240V plug for the 14-50 outlet. If I made another one I would just use some #12 romex since I had a very hard time attaching the #8 wire to the screws in both the plug and outlet. There are detailed instruction online telling you where to attach each wire at both ends.
 

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Think of charging your car like filling a pool with water.

You can run your garden hose out there and let it go. It will be slow, but it will fill it eventually. That is 120 volt L1.

You can run two garden hoses out to double the speed, but you can't just plug them in to the same connection and expect double the flow. They have to come from separate water lines. That is akin to using the EVDoubler.

And then you can hook up a fire hose to the hydrant out front and let 'er rip. That would be akin to installing a 32 amp 240 volt L2 EVSE.
 

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Seem to recall that using two 120 circuits has issues if one or both of the circuits is GFCI protected. Where the GFCI trips because of two different grounds.
 

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Seem to recall that using two 120 circuits has issues if one or both of the circuits is GFCI protected. Where the GFCI trips because of two different grounds.
Yup. Made a doubler before I installed a 14-50 outlet. None of the outlets in our garage have GFCI breakers


Found outlets on two different legs, but it wouldn't work. Turned out one was wired to a GFCI outlet on the other side of the wall outside of the garage. Switched to a different one, and all worked correctly.
 

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If you have a 240 V 50 amp outlet, you can buy an adapter to go between the outlet and the OEM EVSE and double your charging to about 3 kW. (The company I bought the adapter had a list of Serial Numbers on the OEM EVSE that were verified to work at 240 V since the label on the EVSE doesn't mention 240 V usage.) I have a 32 amp 240 V Level 2 EVSE that will charge at about 7.68 kW using that outlet, but I rarely use it because my electric utility charges a hefty demand fee based on the maximum power draw during any 1-hour period during the billing period. I only use it when my solar panels are pumping out 8.83 kW. 95% of the time, I just use the OEM EVSE at 110 V, 12 amps to minimize my nighttime power draw. (Yes, it's incredibly stupid for the utility to penalize off-peak power draw and reward peak power draw. I've been fighting them for 2 years to charge only for peak-demand hours power draw, but they are idiots and don't get it.)
 

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Seem to recall that using two 120 circuits has issues if one or both of the circuits is GFCI protected. Where the GFCI trips because of two different grounds.
Technically:

It's not because of the grounds. GFCIs literally don't have connections to ground, a fact I was blown away by until I researched it.

The doubler hack won't work at all with GFCI. The sum of the currents on the hot and neutral wires must be very close to zero. With the doubler, all current flows between the two hot wires, and nothing over the two neutrals. To the GFCI (or two GFCIs), it appears like a total short to ground has taken place.

For anyone tempted to use an extension cord with 12 amps, please make sure it's 12 gauge or bigger.
 
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