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Why is it we can't just say matter of factly that battery energy density will increase, charging speeds will improve, prices will drop and capacities will grow. To say that because an ev truck wouldn't be competitive today, it won't be competitive in 5-10 years, just demonstrates a lack of a basic understanding of how rapidly technology advances.

The entire auto industry is pushing EV technology forward. Let's agree to meet here in 2028 to evaluate GM's (lack of?)vision with their decision in 2018 to fully commit to expanding their EV offerings.
 

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Consumers already ***** about a $40k sticker on a 3500lbs. compact car with a 60kw battery pack.. wait until they see the sticker price on a big 7000lbs. pickup truck that needs a 120kW pack. And can you really blame them for whining about the $40k when you can get a good gas car for less than half that? And remember GM loses money on every Bolt. You know what, does ANYBODY even make a profit on an EV yet?

Oil is an amazing energy source. Also happens to be an amazingly compact lightweight energy storage medium. 2 in 1! Not even getting into existing infrastructure, don't want to drone on about that. A 2gallon 12 pound jug you can carry easily in your hand will propel a large vehicle 50 miles or more. You can refill your jug in a minute. Wait no, 30 seconds actually. Like seriously its really amazing if you aren't blinded in to seeing only one side of the coin. Having access to it has been great for us humans.

What were we talking about again? Oh yeah GM.
Battery energy density and cost are both improving. Battery chargers are getting more powerful. Right now it makes little sense to try to develop an EV pickup, but in five or ten years an EV pickup might well easily outperform its ICE competition.

Yes, gasoline has great energy density and quick and easy refueling, but if EV pickups are competitive in price and performance they may be a better choice in future. Many pickups are used in business, and EV operating and maintenance costs are much cheaper than any ICE vehicle, a huge selling point for any business.

I don’t see EVs displacing ICE vehicles for a long long time, but as batteries improve and charging infrastructure builds out EVs should become much more popular, even in the light truck and SUV markets.

We’re at the very beginning of the development of mass market EVs, with technology that still has serious shortcomings. With a choice of one and only one reasonably affordable 200+ mile EV, it’s no wonder most consumers aren’t considering an EV. I think this will be changing in the next five to ten years.

As for GM, it makes what people want to buy. Companies that make what people don’t want to buy don’t last very long. I’m glad they made my Bolt, it’s a good car.

My GM grade, based upon a year of Bolt ownership, is A-. If GM makes a few interior upgrades and adds a few more advanced safety features they’ll get an A+.
 

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If an EV truck were profitable, someone would be making them.

Only the first 16 kWh of battery receives the federal tax credit, and anything above that amount is unsubsidized. The larger the battery, the less subsidized it is.

Tesla makes batteries that cost about $190 per kWh. That means a truck with a 120 kWh battery would cost $23,000. That's a lot of money for a slowly refueled gas tank. Then that gas tank would weigh close to 1700 pounds, which is weight that counts against the payload and towing rating.

I do tend to think a hybrid drivetrain with a relatively small 16 kWh battery might make financial sense for a truck, but we're a ways out from a full on EV penciling out favorably.



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The average price for a pickup truck is already 40+, so even 20K of batteries is doable. And you could easily have a 4WD. It would have more peak power, and better acceleration. You can have a built-in inverter for power tools.


If Ford or GM designed an EV truck from scratch, and promoted it, they could easy satisfy 50% of the deman with EV trucks. But why would they canibalize their own sales? Large, established companies never want to disrupt their market and distribution systems.
 

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The average price for a pickup truck is already 40+, so even 20K of batteries is doable. And you could easily have a 4WD. It would have more peak power, and better acceleration. You can have a built-in inverter for power tools.


If Ford or GM designed an EV truck from scratch, and promoted it, they could easy satisfy 50% of the deman with EV trucks. But why would they canibalize their own sales? Large, established companies never want to disrupt their market and distribution systems.
I can't speak to the market demand for an EV truck as I am not an expert, nor do I have access to market studies.

That said, if there were enough demand perceived by manufacturers to build a profitable EV truck, they would make one. A $20k fuel tank puts it at quite a disadvantage. At $3 per gallon, that would buy you 6666 gallons of fuel. At 20 MPG, that would get you 133,000 miles before breaking even with a battery. The truck would be useful locally only, as nobody is going to wait around for 2 hours while their truck "fast" charges.

While I'm no industry expert, my educated guess is that an EV truck doesn't make financial sense right now. While there may be some conspiracy theory that could explain why we don't have an EV truck, the simpler explanation is that the market isn't ready for them yet.

As a transitional technology, I could see a plug-in hybrid truck with a small 4 cylinder engine combined with a 20 kWh battery supplementing the relatively low torque engine. It would get phenomenal city fuel economy since the poor aerodynamics of the truck wouldn't be as big of an issue at low speeds, and energy normally lost in braking could largely be recovered. The maximum tow and payload ratings would be reduced due to the extra weight of all this, which is important criteria for many consumers.
 

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32 years to completely transform a $61 billion, century-old company sounds ambitious. They're taking some meaningful steps in their new direction, and certainly have my support.
 

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I can't speak to the market demand for an EV truck as I am not an expert, nor do I have access to market studies.

That said, if there were enough demand perceived by manufacturers to build a profitable EV truck, they would make one. A $20k fuel tank puts it at quite a disadvantage. At $3 per gallon, that would buy you 6666 gallons of fuel. At 20 MPG, that would get you 133,000 miles before breaking even with a battery. The truck would be useful locally only, as nobody is going to wait around for 2 hours while their truck "fast" charges.

While I'm no industry expert, my educated guess is that an EV truck doesn't make financial sense right now. While there may be some conspiracy theory that could explain why we don't have an EV truck, the simpler explanation is that the market isn't ready for them yet.

As a transitional technology, I could see a plug-in hybrid truck with a small 4 cylinder engine combined with a 20 kWh battery supplementing the relatively low torque engine. It would get phenomenal city fuel economy since the poor aerodynamics of the truck wouldn't be as big of an issue at low speeds, and energy normally lost in braking could largely be recovered. The maximum tow and payload ratings would be reduced due to the extra weight of all this, which is important criteria for many consumers.
You can build a profitable EV truck if you are a start-up company with no existing sales. But if GM does it, their revenues will stay the same (each EV truck is one less gas truck), and their profits will be lower (they have to invest into designing and building two separate trucks with different architectures). So for them, it is not going to be profitable. Not to mention that their current distribution system - dealers - will hate the EV trucks.

Polaroid didn't invest in digital photography. Blockbuster Video didn't invest in digital streaming. Time after time, existing, established companies do not invest in new technology, not because it is not profitable, but because for them, it canibalizes their existing sales and business models, disrupts their relationships with suppliers and distributors.
 

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32 years to completely transform a $61 billion, century-old company sounds ambitious. They're taking some meaningful steps in their new direction, and certainly have my support.
Yeah, better late than never. I think it is going to happen sooner than 2050, and they will probably have to go through another bankruptcy in the process.
 

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As a transitional technology, I could see a plug-in hybrid truck with a small 4 cylinder engine combined with a 20 kWh battery supplementing the relatively low torque engine. It would get phenomenal city fuel economy since the poor aerodynamics of the truck wouldn't be as big of an issue at low speeds, and energy normally lost in braking could largely be recovered. The maximum tow and payload ratings would be reduced due to the extra weight of all this, which is important criteria for many consumers.
https://electrek.co/2018/01/09/workhorse-opens-reservation-electric-pickup-truck/
 
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