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Probably sometime in 2018 GM will hit the 200,000 mark. My question is lets say someone buys a Bolt in January and someone in July after 200,000, when filing taxes in January next year how do the feds determine who gets it if they file the same time.
 

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As I recall, taking the tax credit involves filling out a form that includes make/model/vin and the date the vehicle was put into service (purchase/lease date). Since there's a quarterly phase-out of the tax credit, I think it's purely a matter of buying the car and claiming it for an early quarter of the year. Also, I suspect the IRS is underfunded to the point that they won't be investigating each car to see when it was purchased.
 

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From the VIN they will know who manufactured the car and you will put the date you put the car into service. I don't believe the IRS has information about when exactly a car is purchased from the VIN unless they do some checking, which will require an audit.
 

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While the above makes sense....the IRS is not full of idiots. They could hypothetically **change** how they handle this during phaseout to require, for instance, a dated bill of sale, to be attached.

Not likely IMO, but certainly possible.
 

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The start of the phaseout is tied to the date they reach 200K sales, but after that there are no volume limits to the number of credits during. The amount of credit is then tied to the date "placed in service" (the purchase date for 99+% of all transactions).

Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Credit (IRC 30D) Phase Out
The qualified plug-in electric drive motor vehicle credit phases out for a manufacturer’s vehicles over the one-year period beginning with the second calendar quarter after the calendar quarter in which at least 200,000 qualifying vehicles manufactured by that manufacturer have been sold for use in the United States (determined on a cumulative basis for sales after December 31, 2009) (“phase-out period”). Qualifying vehicles manufactured by that manufacturer are eligible for 50 percent of the credit if acquired in the first two quarters of the phase-out period and 25 percent of the credit if acquired in the third or fourth quarter of the phase-out period. Vehicles manufactured by that manufacturer are not eligible for a credit if acquired after the phase-out period.
https://www.irs.gov/businesses/plug-in-electric-vehicle-credit-irc-30-and-irc-30d

Form 8936 is used when you file and already has provisions for the phase out.
Form:
https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8936.pdf
Instructions:
https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i8936.pdf

And as to the IRS checking, it is the same as for any other deduction and will only need documentation in the case of an audit. You can claim $10K in cash to a 501 charity (pick the OEVA if you are so inclined:D), tithing to your church, a solar panel installation,etc. and they take you at your word - until they don't.

It wouldn't surprise me if a form 8936 is one of the flags that can help trigger an audit in 2018 and beyond as the phase out begins for various manufacturers.
 

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So here's the question I've been starting to ask many people who currently own EVs or are thinking about getting them. Assuming the credit didn't exist, would that keep you from buying an EV?
 

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So here's the question I've been starting to ask many people who currently own EVs or are thinking about getting them. Assuming the credit didn't exist, would that keep you from buying an EV?
Definitely was a factor. I knew some day I would own a pure electric. Without the credit, I would have waited longer. Actually still was a bad decision economically. But I'm getting to the point in life where I'm Spending the Kid's Inheritance (SKI).
 

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Tax credit was most definitely a factor for me. $30K was about as much as I was willing to spend on an optional vehicle purchase.
The IRS can always trace the VIN back to state vehicle registration. They will know if you are naughty or nice.
 

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Fuel savings is significant when compared with a car that gets, say 25 mpg, even at the low US fuel cost. This helps to justify the added cost of driving a “no gas” car, for those who intend to keep their EV long term. This savings will almost put the Bolt into the “normal car cost” during its lifespan if nothing major breaks after the warranty period.
 

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So here's the question I've been starting to ask many people who currently own EVs or are thinking about getting them. Assuming the credit didn't exist, would that keep you from buying an EV?
I probably would have bought anyway. When it looked like the tax credit might be eliminated for 2017, I was irritated, but it's not the sort of stunning reversal you can get in the stock market. I had gotten 20 years out of the vehicle it was replacing. I needed a new car, wanted an electric with some range, and I didn't think the timeline for getting a M3 was reasonable.

Could the Bolt be better? Sure, and in 10 years (when it's time to replace the other car), there will be a ton of options.
 

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Definitely was a factor. I knew some day I would own a pure electric. Without the credit, I would have waited longer. Actually still was a bad decision economically. But I'm getting to the point in life where I'm Spending the Kid's Inheritance (SKI).
X2 and for true. We don't drive a lot of local miles and with two paid-for ICEs in the garage, there was no contortion of math/logic which would make an EV a positive economic decision. At the bottom line, only that the Bolt is such a hoot to drive made the buying decision.

jack vines
 

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Fuel savings is significant when compared with a car that gets, say 25 mpg, even at the low US fuel cost. This helps to justify the added cost of driving a “no gas” car, for those who intend to keep their EV long term. This savings will almost put the Bolt into the “normal car cost” during its lifespan if nothing major breaks after the warranty period.
Not disagreeing with you, but that obviously depends on the car and how people define "normal". I tend to favor small hatchback type cars that cost less than half (or close) of what the average EV is going for. I can get a high mpg hatch new for around $15K or thereabouts and that's half of what an average EV costs (let's say $35K). That $20K plus in savings pays for a lot of gas and maintenance over the next several years. Now sure, if someone is buying a comparably priced sedan/truck/SUV with poor mileage, the savings in gas obviously adds up and can tip the scales.

This also goes back to my question of whether or not people would still buy an EV if the tax credit (state and/or federal) was not available.
 

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Not disagreeing with you, but that obviously depends on the car and how people define "normal". I tend to favor small hatchback type cars that cost less than half (or close) of what the average EV is going for. I can get a high mpg hatch new for around $15K or thereabouts and that's half of what an average EV costs (let's say $35K). That $20K plus in savings pays for a lot of gas and maintenance over the next several years. Now sure, if someone is buying a comparably priced sedan/truck/SUV with poor mileage, the savings in gas obviously adds up and can tip the scales.

This also goes back to my question of whether or not people would still buy an EV if the tax credit (state and/or federal) was not available.
If you compare an EV to the most fuel efficient ICE options available, the EV certainly looks very expensive.

If, however, you look for something with the "fun" factor of an EV, you'll pay the price in both $$ and fuel economy.

The #1 reason EV owners cite for wanting to drive electric is the performance. Closely followed by the vastly reduced maintenance and the convenience of fueling at home.

YMMV
 

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... Assuming the credit didn't exist, would that keep you from buying an EV?
My answer to this is based on, perhaps, an unusual reason.

I went to Standing Rock and saw how the oil industry-hired goons, directed by Tiger Swan, a private security firm made up of ex-military psych-warfare people, treated peaceful protesters. I will NOT give those sumbiches one dime of my money. So, yes, I would have bought a Bolt at full price.
 

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My answer to this is based on, perhaps, an unusual reason.

I went to Standing Rock and saw how the oil industry-hired goons, directed by Tiger Swan, a private security firm made up of ex-military psych-warfare people, treated peaceful protesters. I will NOT give those sumbiches one dime of my money. So, yes, I would have bought a Bolt at full price.
A principled stance, but not buying gasoline or diesel at the pump is not bankrupting the petroleum industry. Probably a majority of the energy used to produce and deliver the products one uses in the home and at work have petroleum derivatives or are packaged in petroleum derivatives. At this point in time, petroleum energy production and by-products are effectively impossible to escape. Each person making informed decisions and trying to move beyond petrol should hasten the day.

jack vines
 

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If you compare an EV to the most fuel efficient ICE options available, the EV certainly looks very expensive.

If, however, you look for something with the "fun" factor of an EV, you'll pay the price in both $$ and fuel economy.

The #1 reason EV owners cite for wanting to drive electric is the performance. Closely followed by the vastly reduced maintenance and the convenience of fueling at home.

YMMV
Hmm, I've never talked to anyone with an EV who said their number one reason for owning it was the "fun factor", but OK. I've driven a Leaf, nothing fun about that one and Nissan has sold more of those than any other EV to date ;)
 
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