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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After several months and multiple people at Chevy/GM, I just got this.

35720


Does this look about right? My instinct is "yes," but I wanted to run in by folks here who are smarter than me about such things.

Interestingly, the replacement VIN is one that on May 7 I visited a dealership to select, and they said they would hold it for 3 weeks, which meant until May 28. A week or two ago I looked at that dealership's website and the car did not seem to be in its inventory. I mentioned that to the person I had been dealing with most recently, and he asked for more detail, which I gave. The original URL to the car no longer works. I dunno if it was sold or if it was taken off the market and is awaiting my approval and paperwork. I need to ask the rep this specifically still.
 

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"...in exchange for the release of liability stemming from the warranty..." is a bizarre statement. I mean, they buy the car, so what do you or GM care about the warranty on the used car? That warranty was only while you owned it anyway. Weird. They can't be talking about class-action liability, since it's not part of a "warranty" of any kind. Class-action lawsuits might attempt to compensate you for the extra risk you took driving that car for 2 years though. Maybe they want to zero-out liability for putting you through this tribulation, I guess.
So the $6.7k you pay is 2 years of use. Plus the fact you gain a new, zero-miles car, so I'd say it's worth it.
 

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Does this look about right?
The language looks exactly like the letters I got for both of my Bolt repurchase offers, but I have only had straight buyback offers, not replacement. That said, if it's an MSRP swap, then all that is relevant to be listed is the usage deduction.

I'm assuming you'd done your calculations on the difference in cost for a straight repurchase, then buy a new car, vs the swap.

The rest of the lingo is just about releasing Chevy from any liabilities you could try to enforce regarding your experience with the car and their failing to meet the conditions of the warranties and sales agreement. Basically put, we're swapping you into a new car and as part of that deal you don't get to have any claim on anything additional relating to your current Bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The language looks exactly like the letters I got for both of my Bolt repurchase offers, but I have only had straight buyback offers, not replacement. That said, if it's an MSRP swap, then all that is relevant to be listed is the usage deduction.

I'm assuming you'd done your calculations on the difference in cost for a straight repurchase, then buy a new car, vs the swap.

The rest of the lingo is just about releasing Chevy from any liabilities you could try to enforce regarding your experience with the car and their failing to meet the conditions of the warranties and sales agreement. Basically put, we're swapping you into a new car and as part of that deal you don't get to have any claim on anything additional relating to your current Bolt.
I never got a buyback option--but then, I never sought it out specifically once I started reading about "MSRP swaps," which seemed to be simpler than getting a check and then having to shop for a new Bolt--so I never did said calculations. I supposed I might come out "ahead" if that figure would be what they take off the original MSRP of $40K (vs. the $30K I actually paid), but if the difference wasn't that great, I'd rather save the work and hassle.
 

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Looks similar to the letter I rejected for a "swap". My swap would have cost me ~$5k.

I then asked for a straight buy back offer. That came in at $41k for a '17 Premier with 15k miles in California.

New '21s were on the lot, and going for $29k, with lots of dealer (and Costco) incentives.

I opted for the straight buyback, bought a new '21 on the spot, and pocketed the $12k difference.

The difference between a swap and a direct buyback was $17k...in my favor.

I strongly suggest you ask for a "straight buyback" offer. Do note that the moment you ask for that, the vehicle previously set aside will likely be put back into dealer inventory, subject to being purchased by someone else before you coordinate with the salesperson for a future purchase using the buyback funds. You should contact the salesperson at the identified dealer directly to coordinate the whole thing, so that doesn't happen. Otherwise, you could find yourself with a big check, but no replacement vehicle available, unless you want to wait for a '22. Do note that incentives for a new '22 are few and far between, so you'd probably end up paying MSRP for it.
 

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I'm still in awe of your sweet deal, GregBrew.
 

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Is there a difference in how taxes are charged between a swap and and buyback/repurchase ?
IIRC, taxes and such were baked into the both types of buyback, with GM paying them.

Truthfully, my attention to detail was somewhat curbed by the number appearing at the bottom of the page.
 

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I never got a buyback option--but then, I never sought it out specifically once I started reading about "MSRP swaps," which seemed to be simpler than getting a check and then having to shop for a new Bolt--so I never did said calculations. I supposed I might come out "ahead" if that figure would be what they take off the original MSRP of $40K (vs. the $30K I actually paid), but if the difference wasn't that great, I'd rather save the work and hassle.
As @GregBrew indicated in his response, my understanding is that most people have come out far ahead doing a straight buyback rather than the swap. The only case where the swap was worth it was when a usage fee wasn't applied, which I believe is related to state of residence - but don't quote me on that.

As far as the "hassle" is concerned I don't know that I'd see it that way. You're dealing with a hassle in needing to identify a vehicle that can be subject to the swap, as demonstrated by the fact that the one you selected no longer appears available.

I don't know that many people will "win the lottery" as GregBrew did, but I think you'd do yourself a great service in requesting that they provide the numbers on the straight buyback.
 

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After several months and multiple people at Chevy/GM, I just got this.

View attachment 35720

Does this look about right? My instinct is "yes," but I wanted to run in by folks here who are smarter than me about such things.

Interestingly, the replacement VIN is one that on May 7 I visited a dealership to select, and they said they would hold it for 3 weeks, which meant until May 28. A week or two ago I looked at that dealership's website and the car did not seem to be in its inventory. I mentioned that to the person I had been dealing with most recently, and he asked for more detail, which I gave. The original URL to the car no longer works. I dunno if it was sold or if it was taken off the market and is awaiting my approval and paperwork. I need to ask the rep this specifically still.
Wording was very similar to my letter, except mine was a straight buyback. My guess on the VIN no longer showing up is that it has been reserved for you. By the time it gets to the legal contract, the VIN has to be right.

As for the straight buyback, the usage is taken off the vehicle sales price BEFORE any rebates, trade, etc. Taxes are also refunded to you. It was a great deal. I turned in a 2019 LT with 20k, and bought a 2021 Premier and walked out with a check for $4000 in my pocket. The problem is the supply of 2021 is just about dry. By the time you could change directions, and everything going back to GM, you may not have a 2021 to buy. If you can verify that the vehicle in the offer letter is indeed reserved for you, that may, at this point, be your best bet.
 
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