Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
8159 miles and just completed the first maintenance item. Rotated the tires. Wow don't know if I can keep up with all this maintenance I have to complete. ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter #4

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
probably worn down by 0.000001mm, good on you for rotating them, too bad maintenance couldn't be easier!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Did Chevy cover the rotation (that's what it says on my Monroney sticker)?
I did them myself. My sticker says two free maintenance checkups. I think that would include rotating tires but didn't ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
Just make you guys are doing other things the dealer would do during maintenance service like check tire pressures, lube hinges, locks, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
As someone who has serviced GM (and other brands) cars since 1967, I follow the factory scheduled maintenance to prevent voiding the factory warranty. I let the dealer(s) do the first two years and pay for it, because they can find and fix the so called "infant problems" especially for a new model year. Meanwhile, I learn what they do and lhow they do it. Then I start doing it myself, using the owner manual first, later buying other published manuals available at auto supply shops. After the two years, I buy the factory service manuals and read them from cover to cover. Finally after the factory warranty expires, I do most of the maintenance and repair services myself if I have the tools or have my family mechanic do it for me. The only job I cannot do is replace tires on my wheels, but a tire shop near my home does that for my cars.

Doing all this for almost 50 years has helped me save thousands of dollars and keep my GM cars runnning for over twenty years each. And that prevented me from buying more cars. In the last twenty years I had only two vehicles (a 1995 Buick Regal and a 2009 Chevy Equinox), while some of my fellow workmates had changed their cars every five years.

So if I can buy my first EV, such as the Chevy Bolt EV, it may be my last vehicle, having so little maintenence work to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Apparently the Nissan Leaf requires a brake fluid change every 20K, at least according to my dealer. I hope the Bolt doesn't.
Every 5 years per the manual
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
On the bright side, there's no need for oil changes, transmission fluids etc. Brake fluid change every 5 years seems like nothing compared to ICE vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
Dunno if there's a difference, I think they should be generally the same. Heard it's based on moist air getting into the electric car brake master cylinders unless Chevy managed a 100% seal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
Just rotated the tires this past weekend.

All I have to add is that the Bolt is HEAVY!

Used the 3 ton jack normally reserved for the Ford Expedition. The amount of "pump" needed was noticeably different than my previous / lighter cars.

For future reference, I used a 19mm deep socket and the nuts take 100 lb ft torque.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Im about to do my first service...I was told every 5,000 miles ( and the sticker that the dealer put on my windshield says 5,000 ) also I think my dealer says I get 2 years of maintenance not 2 visits....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Dunno if there's a difference, I think they should be generally the same. Heard it's based on moist air getting into the electric car brake master cylinders unless Chevy managed a 100% seal.
Brake fluid is strongly hygroscopic and there is no system tight enough to keep it from absorbing water. In a track car, fluid has to be replaced every few months, as absorbed water lowers the boiling point of the fluid, which can get very hot inside the calipers on the track causing the pedal to become spongy (hydraulics work because fluid is essentially incompressible - vapor in the system renders the brakes ineffective since gasses are highly compressible). This isn't a serious problem in the Bolt, where a number of effects greatly reduce the need for the friction brakes to dissipate large amounts of energy in a limited time. At some point, the fluid may become saturated enough with water that it can affect components in the system: I suspect this is behind the 5 year interval, where proper choice of materials can extend the necessary change interval.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Isn't one of the advantages of taking the vehicle to the dealer early on, is that besides all the stuff you can do yourself (like tire rotation), there are some things which can be only done at the dealer such as a software update. Why forgo the software update? Also, how can one tell that the dealer actually did the software update (as it takes time and perhaps a level of expertise that not every service technician has)?
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top