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Ford is hoping to speed up development of its EVs by opening up its EV patents to its competitors. Ford holds over 650 electrified vehicle patents, and has 1,000 other patents pending.

“Innovation is our goal,” said Kevin Layden, director, Ford Electrification Programs. “The way to provide the best technology is through constant development and progress. By sharing our research with other companies, we will accelerate the growth of electrified vehicle technology and deliver even better products to customers.”
It won't be free to get access to Ford's patents though. Interested parties must contact Ford's technology commercialization and licensing office, or go through a service called AutoHarvest, which is an automaker derived collaborative idea and licensing marketplace. Interested parties will have to pay a fee to see the EV patents.
 

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Ford is confirming what I long feared about this niche. Its too costly to make money. Ford is opening its IP up in the hope that others can help them lower the cost of components through aggregated volume. These seem like signals that the market simply can't support itself. The auto industry was birthed through intense competition, this everybody wins lets be friends approach is solely for survival in this odd and prohibitively expensive niche.

Its all baked into their quote, just hidden behind the words: "The way to provide the best technology is through constant development and progress. By sharing our research with other companies, we will accelerate the growth of electrified vehicle technology and deliver even better products to customers.

"By sharing our research we can collectively bring the cost of components down until the point where we don't need your help any longer we will close the books again and bury you one volume, Cigarette?"
 

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If Ford wants to produce more EVs at a lower cost, they can buy GM parts. The Spark EV motor is one of the best designs. Being hollow, one of the output axles passes through it, saving materials, cost, space, and weight. This is probably what the Chevy Bolt willl also use.

The Spark EV battery pack is also an advanced design, being flat and liquid cooled, so it can fit under the floor, probably where the regular gas tank would go. Thus it will recover the lost trunk space that most Ford conversions suffer now.

Unfortunately, there is no lithium-ion battery pack standard designs, even if most EV manufacturers are using the same LG Chemical cells. A flat pack standard can simplify new BEV designs and allow pack replacements to be easier than replacing the common 12 VDC lead-acid battery, which has some standard sizes.

We are still in the early EV age (started in 2009) when Nissan and GM both announced their EV concepts. The gas engine market has over 120 years of lead time, so we may see better EVs in the next 20 years. I just hope that GM, Ford, and TM lead the way.
 

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Although they've let the competition in on what they're doing you can bet they didn't give away all of it, just enough that gets the ball rolling; speeding up the process of other manufactures coming online with their own EV's, all to create a real market than being the lone wolf.
 

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If Ford wants to produce more EVs at a lower cost, they can buy GM parts. The Spark EV motor is one of the best designs. Being hollow, one of the output axles passes through it, saving materials, cost, space, and weight. This is probably what the Chevy Bolt willl also use.

The Spark EV battery pack is also an advanced design, being flat and liquid cooled, so it can fit under the floor, probably where the regular gas tank would go. Thus it will recover the lost trunk space that most Ford conversions suffer now.

Unfortunately, there is no lithium-ion battery pack standard designs, even if most EV manufacturers are using the same LG Chemical cells. A flat pack standard can simplify new BEV designs and allow pack replacements to be easier than replacing the common 12 VDC lead-acid battery, which has some standard sizes.

We are still in the early EV age (started in 2009) when Nissan and GM both announced their EV concepts. The gas engine market has over 120 years of lead time, so we may see better EVs in the next 20 years. I just hope that GM, Ford, and TM lead the way.
I really hope Tesla does not continue to insist on its own standards...it would advance all EVs to have common standards on everything from lithium-ion batteries, to electric motors, to chargers.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think at a beginning stage, its important to have multiple different versions of the same technology in development. I'm not sure when time is, but at some point they should standardize them. Like how there was Blue-Ray and HD-DVD, but then everybody chose Blue-Ray. Not exactly analogous, but you get the idea.
 

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I really hope Tesla does not continue to insist on its own standards...it would advance all EVs to have common standards on everything from lithium-ion batteries, to electric motors, to chargers.
Makes even more sense when you think long term, getting replacement parts, servicing, etc.
 
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