Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I played with the filters on Chargepoint app and saw that there are free DC Fast Chargers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,186 Posts
I played with the filters on Chargepoint app and saw that there are free DC Fast Chargers!
There are quite a few free DC chargers around Virginia. Unfortunately, you often get what you paid for. No prospect of making money means no hurry to service these units.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I also saw several provided by Facebook. Wonder if it means you're giving up your information while charging. :ROFLMAO:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
There are DC fast chargers, then there are DC really fast chargers. The free DCFC in my area are 24kW. I've used them before and I appreciate them if I have time on my hands. I'm not complaining, mind you, but just saying....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,049 Posts
I played with the filters on Chargepoint app and saw that there are free DC Fast Chargers!
Yeah, we have a lot of 50kW fast chargers in BC as part of the BC Hydro rollout of charging infrastructure. I expect they will start charging for these at some point.

The big downside to free, though, is the fact that the chargers in the city are always busy, and usually have a queue. It's not a problem for me around town because I charge in my garage, but when I'm out on the road I'm more than happy to pay for charging if it means that the charger is likely to be available when I need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
The only free DCFC I've used is at the Sierra Nevada Brewery in Chico, CA. It's an older 24kW model, but it's been around for years and I'm thankful to SNB every single time I've used it. The only thing better is their beer and the food at the their restaurant! The other plus is that the brewery and parking area are covered in solar panels. Check it out sometime on google earth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, we have a lot of 50kW fast chargers in BC as part of the BC Hydro rollout of charging infrastructure. I expect they will start charging for these at some point.

The big downside to free, though, is the fact that the chargers in the city are always busy, and usually have a queue. It's not a problem for me around town because I charge in my garage, but when I'm out on the road I'm more than happy to pay for charging if it means that the charger is likely to be available when I need it.
Looks like an electric road trip to BC is in order. :) Would be great to be emission free at the border... so many idling cars there...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
There are a fair number of 20-25 kW free chargers - BMW and Chevy dealers, and lately Harley Davidson dealers in my area.

Free is obviously unsustainable, but it is easy to envision a future of 20-25 kW chargers priced at 2-3x the cost of home kWh distributed at grocery stores, big box stores, doctors offices, and movie theaters - places where drivers typically park for 30-120 minutes. 6 - 12 cents per minute should be in the range the market would bear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,049 Posts
Looks like an electric road trip to BC is in order. :) Would be great to be emission free at the border... so many idling cars there...
If you're not going to enter and leave the US too often it may not be worth it, but a NEXUS card is a terrific way to cross the border without having to deal with the lineups. And it works at airports too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Would be nice if the DCFC stations stop charging once your battery hits 80%. Then have several L2 chargers nearby.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
Would be nice if the DCFC stations stop charging once your battery hits 80%. Then have several L2 chargers nearby.
Slower charging at high SOC is a problem for sure. I've always been of the mind that it's easier to move electricity than to move a car. I see three use cases for the paired DCFC/L2 are needed:

1. The EV owner is parked in the spot to do something else: see a movie, eating, etc. Having to get up in the middle of that activity to move the car is a pain. The owner really needs the parking spot.

2. The EV owner really needs a charge up to 100%. In that case the owner really needs the charger.

3. The EV owner only needs 80% and will be leaving as soon as they reach that threshold. In that case after 80% neither the charger nor the parking spot is needed.

A better solution for all three is to have a DCFC with multiple, as in 4, 6, or 8, cables that can service multiple parking spots. A DCFC in the middle of 4 parking spots could service 4 vehicles simply by scheduling the power to the cables. The EV owner can tell the station what SOC and what timeframe they plan to use the spot just like current parking kiosks. So in our 3 cases:

1. The EV owner leaves the car parked in the spot. Other EV owners who need to charge can park in the other spots and get their EVs charged without having to move any cars.

2. The EV owner continues to use the charger and space at a reduced power level. The remaining power of the station can be used to charge other cars connected to other cables.

3. The EV owner will soon be back. Depending on the current situation, just continue to charge the car until they show, or divert power to other connected EVs that need to charge.

This setup would essentially eliminate L2 from the public charging equation. It also has the added benefit of working on overloaded holidays for ultra high speed charging too. Instead of waiting in line in the car, a driver and their crew can park and plug in and go take care of other business while the car waits in its parking space for power to get to it. 10 stations with 8 slots each could service 80 cars without having any person waiting in the car to move it to a cable.

As EVs ramp up, we're going to need smarter, larger scale charging infrastructure to support the cars.

ga2500ev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
I've learned to look for free fast charging on plugshare for long trips. Many are located in downtown areas of small towns. I've had many nice walks, and meals. Hopefully it will become a nice way for towns to attract EV owners with an hour or so on their hands
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I've learned to look for free fast charging on plugshare for long trips. Many are located in downtown areas of small towns. I've had many nice walks, and meals. Hopefully it will become a nice way for towns to attract EV owners with an hour or so on their hands
With enough EVs, maybe we can revive Route 66 for EV travels. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I've learned to look for free fast charging on plugshare for long trips. Many are located in downtown areas of small towns. I've had many nice walks, and meals. Hopefully it will become a nice way for towns to attract EV owners with an hour or so on their hands
We have a 4 hour commute from VT through Upstate NY to my wife's family on the eastern edge of Lake Ontario. It's just a bit too far to be comfortable taking her new Bolt without a good charging stop somewhere long the route (and that's if we don't need to use the Heat or AC). We can find a few L2 AC chargers along the route, but would really prefer not to make a really extended stop. We'd love to see even a 25kW DC charger somewhere along this mostly rural route through the Adirondaks. I wonder what ti would take to convince the town of Speculator, NY to add one? It's the perfect halfway spot for us, site at a crossroads, is bit bit of a rural tourist/outdoor activities hub. We always stop there now when driving our ICE. In reality, any of the small towns we pass through would immediately become our regular stop (and our Bolt would become the vehicle of choice for at least 3 seasons of the year), if they had something that would charge significantly faster than the Bolts 32A L2 AC limit.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top