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As a brand new 2022 Bolt EV owner, I'm extremely disappointed in Chevy's "free installation" program. Chevy has serup a group, QMerit, to oversee Level 2 home installations. QMerit (or someone) "qualifies" electriclal installers for home installations. (Installer qualification requirements are unknown.) Once your dealer gets you into the free installation program, you take pictures of your electrical panel, garage and electric meter. The installer uses these pictures to estimate installation costs. He soesn't actually visit your home, which would provide a more accurate estimate. In my case, the QMerit qualified installer decided that we needed to replace my entire electrical service for about $3300, which less Chevy's $1000 allowance, left me with $2300 out of pocket. I'm a retired engineer, so this seemed a bit exorbitant. A local licensed electrical service quoted $631 to install a Level 2 220 volt, 60 amp outlet using my existing electrical panel. You should know also that Chevy's Level 2 charging cord is not included and is a bit pricey. Lower cost alternatives are available (the connector to the Bolt is a J1722 and the connector to the wall socket is a NEMA 14-50 Tesla uses a proprietary connector, so if you want to charge at a Tesla station, you'll need an adaptor to connect the Tesla plug to a J1722 plug.)

If you don't want the "free installation" offer, Chevy offers a $500 credit for charging at EVGO charging stations. Just like there are different gas station brands, there are different EV charging station brands. EVGO is one brant, Electrify America is another, Tesla is another. In my case, the closest EVGO charging station is 75 miles away. There are Tesla and Electrify America charging stations about 3 miles away. For me, Chevy's EVGO credit is useless. If Chevy really wanted to entice Bolt buyers, they'd trust licensed electricians to know what they're doing, and they'd offer a charging credit that could be used at any EV charging station.

Lastly, the Chevy dealer that sold us our Bolt didn't know about Chevy's "free installation" program. I had to ask him about it. He got uss into the program, but as above, it's been a disappointment, and quite frankly, I shouldn't have to train the dealer.

I should say that my wife and I are quite happy with our new 2022 Bolt. We bought it to toodle arount town for groceries, appointments, short local trips, etc., for which it's perfiect. Trips longer than haff the battery charge are as yet impractical. There aren't enough charging stations especially in rural areas, and it takes more time to charge the battery than to fill the gas tank. We have a hybrid for longer trips. We're trying to go green, but there's a lot of work yet to be done.

Thanks for letting me gripe.
 

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Trips longer than haff the battery charge are as yet impractical. There aren't enough charging stations especially in rural areas, and it takes more time to charge the battery than to fill the gas tank.
Welcome to the forum and on your new Bolt!

I found that the 7100 mile trip we recently completed in our Bolt was tolerable. My wife and I recently retired, so time wasn't a critical factor for us. We found EA sites about every 100 miles and averaged about 47 minutes per stop. Each day, we covered close to the miles we would have done in an ICE, but it took 2-3 hours longer to reach the destination.

If your trips stick to the Interstates, it is possible. But if your routes are off the main path, yup it is still less than ideal. But given where we were 4 years ago when I bought my Bolt, the infrastructure is already infinitely better. Just imagine what it will be like in a few years with the $5B infrastructure money tossed into the pot.
 

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As a prospective buyer myself, would you mind sharing what exactly made your installations “non standard”? I’m looking at having to run about 100ft of cable and go through a wall, but other than that it should be straightforward. Wondering if standard installation is only stupidly easy installs though.
 

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We couldn’t use any of those offers either. The one from our electric utility was also useless.

I bought a Chargepoint branded L2 EVSE for $500, and a local electrician installed it for $100. Bought a second one for my parents house since 90% of my driving is to go over there and look after them, and they are just far enough away that in winter, the Bolt can’t make the round trip without a charge. They have a different electric company and their offer was useless too.

Just sales gimmicks to send you to a provider who overcharges you by more than the rebate amount.
 

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As a prospective buyer myself, would you mind sharing what exactly made your installations “non standard”?
Probably anything other than the ability to add the charger within 5' of the panel and the panel must have open slots to add the breakers. Basically unless you could do it yourself for $100 in parts it will be deemed non-standard. Just a guess but after dealing with electricians I expect to be close to right.

Running 100' of wire is going will be $200-$300 by itself for the wire. Then add conduit and labor.

Here is the thing. If you drive less than 60 miles a day a L2 240v EVSE is not needed. Buy a good 120v 12-15amp EVSE and be done. It is nice to have the 240v but by no means required. You can even use the one that comes with the car.

I hate to say it but I feel the "free" L2 install is more of a marketing ploy than an honest attempt to help the customer. If you see it as that then you may be less disappointed.
 

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This is exactly why gift cards are dumb. Why didn't they just take $1k off the price of the car? My wife's big on gift cards, and I loathe them. When I don't know what to give someone, I give the universal gift card, called US dollars. Accepted most places. Everything else is inferior.
 

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Probably anything other than the ability to add the charger within 5' of the panel and the panel must have open slots to add the breakers. Basically unless you could do it yourself for $100 in parts it will be deemed non-standard. Just a guess but after dealing with electricians I expect to be close to right.

Running 100' of wire is going will be $200-$300 by itself for the wire. Then add conduit and labor.

Here is the thing. If you drive less than 60 miles a day a L2 240v EVSE is not needed. Buy a good 120v 12-15amp EVSE and be done. It is nice to have the 240v but by no means required. You can even use the one that comes with the car.

I hate to say it but I feel the "free" L2 install is more of a marketing ploy than an honest attempt to help the customer. If you see it as that then you may be less disappointed.
$200-300 is the goold old days.

 
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Yeah, I said no thanks to the installation offer with my swapped EUV. Took the EV credits even though EVGO sites around here are garbage compared to EA. Too bad I just couldn't pocket the money and use it to cover the $ for the new wire I ran...
 

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I think the concept is sound, but the execution is flawed. EV ownership, right now, is as much about how one will charge the EV (due to limited public charging infrastructure) as about the EV itself. An incentive to help build charging infrastructure at home makes sense, especially for mainstream buyers (not early adopters) who may not have researched charging too carefully.

It's also a way to counter the anti-EV FUD about the "hidden" / "extreme" cost of installing an EVSE at home.

The execution, however, relies on a 3rd party that has no incentive to keep costs down. If anything, QMerit has an incentive to increase price to just below normal price + GM subsidy. So the subsidy goes to QMerit, rather than reducing the cost for the EV owner.

A rebate directly to the EV owner would work better. Just make the customer provide documentation that the work was done by a licensed electrician, and leave it at that.
 

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As a brand new 2022 Bolt EV owner, I'm extremely disappointed in Chevy's "free installation" program. Chevy has serup a group, QMerit, to oversee Level 2 home installations. QMerit (or someone) "qualifies" electriclal installers for home installations. (Installer qualification requirements are unknown.) Once your dealer gets you into the free installation program, you take pictures of your electrical panel, garage and electric meter. The installer uses these pictures to estimate installation costs. He soesn't actually visit your home, which would provide a more accurate estimate. In my case, the QMerit qualified installer decided that we needed to replace my entire electrical service for about $3300, which less Chevy's $1000 allowance, left me with $2300 out of pocket. I'm a retired engineer, so this seemed a bit exorbitant. A local licensed electrical service quoted $631 to install a Level 2 220 volt, 60 amp outlet using my existing electrical panel. You should know also that Chevy's Level 2 charging cord is not included and is a bit pricey. Lower cost alternatives are available (the connector to the Bolt is a J1722 and the connector to the wall socket is a NEMA 14-50 Tesla uses a proprietary connector, so if you want to charge at a Tesla station, you'll need an adaptor to connect the Tesla plug to a J1722 plug.)

If you don't want the "free installation" offer, Chevy offers a $500 credit for charging at EVGO charging stations. Just like there are different gas station brands, there are different EV charging station brands. EVGO is one brant, Electrify America is another, Tesla is another. In my case, the closest EVGO charging station is 75 miles away. There are Tesla and Electrify America charging stations about 3 miles away. For me, Chevy's EVGO credit is useless. If Chevy really wanted to entice Bolt buyers, they'd trust licensed electricians to know what they're doing, and they'd offer a charging credit that could be used at any EV charging station.

Lastly, the Chevy dealer that sold us our Bolt didn't know about Chevy's "free installation" program. I had to ask him about it. He got uss into the program, but as above, it's been a disappointment, and quite frankly, I shouldn't have to train the dealer.

I should say that my wife and I are quite happy with our new 2022 Bolt. We bought it to toodle arount town for groceries, appointments, short local trips, etc., for which it's perfiect. Trips longer than haff the battery charge are as yet impractical. There aren't enough charging stations especially in rural areas, and it takes more time to charge the battery than to fill the gas tank. We have a hybrid for longer trips. We're trying to go green, but there's a lot of work yet to be done.

Thanks for letting me gripe.
My experience was entirely different. Took the required pics. Qmerit quoted $1,000.00 and assigned the task to a local electrical contractor. The contractor arranged an appropriate date with me, arrived on time and set immediately to work. A few hours later knocked on my door to say they were through and the next person I heard from was the county electrical inspector who came and attached his imprimatur to the installation. Next my local utility company has had a standing offer of $500.00 credit to any customer purchasing and installing a level 2 charger. I took them up on that offer, installed a Grizzl-E charger and have been a totally happy camper since. Add this experience to my MSRP swap for my 2019, wherein GM paid off my car loan, and gave me a few bucks pocket change and a nice new 2022 2LT. I am totally happy with GM, Chevy Bolt and the rest of the world!
 

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As a brand new 2022 Bolt EV owner, I'm extremely disappointed in Chevy's "free installation" program. Chevy has serup a group, QMerit, to oversee Level 2 home installations. QMerit (or someone) "qualifies" electriclal installers for home installations. (Installer qualification requirements are unknown.) Once your dealer gets you into the free installation program, you take pictures of your electrical panel, garage and electric meter. The installer uses these pictures to estimate installation costs. He soesn't actually visit your home, which would provide a more accurate estimate. In my case, the QMerit qualified installer decided that we needed to replace my entire electrical service for about $3300, which less Chevy's $1000 allowance, left me with $2300 out of pocket. I'm a retired engineer, so this seemed a bit exorbitant. A local licensed electrical service quoted $631 to install a Level 2 220 volt, 60 amp outlet using my existing electrical panel. You should know also that Chevy's Level 2 charging cord is not included and is a bit pricey. Lower cost alternatives are available (the connector to the Bolt is a J1722 and the connector to the wall socket is a NEMA 14-50 Tesla uses a proprietary connector, so if you want to charge at a Tesla station, you'll need an adaptor to connect the Tesla plug to a J1722 plug.)

If you don't want the "free installation" offer, Chevy offers a $500 credit for charging at EVGO charging stations. Just like there are different gas station brands, there are different EV charging station brands. EVGO is one brant, Electrify America is another, Tesla is another. In my case, the closest EVGO charging station is 75 miles away. There are Tesla and Electrify America charging stations about 3 miles away. For me, Chevy's EVGO credit is useless. If Chevy really wanted to entice Bolt buyers, they'd trust licensed electricians to know what they're doing, and they'd offer a charging credit that could be used at any EV charging station.

Lastly, the Chevy dealer that sold us our Bolt didn't know about Chevy's "free installation" program. I had to ask him about it. He got uss into the program, but as above, it's been a disappointment, and quite frankly, I shouldn't have to train the dealer.

I should say that my wife and I are quite happy with our new 2022 Bolt. We bought it to toodle arount town for groceries, appointments, short local trips, etc., for which it's perfiect. Trips longer than haff the battery charge are as yet impractical. There aren't enough charging stations especially in rural areas, and it takes more time to charge the battery than to fill the gas tank. We have a hybrid for longer trips. We're trying to go green, but there's a lot of work yet to be done.

Thanks for letting me gripe.
I am waiting on the OTD for a 2022 EUV LT. Good to know how the QMerit program works. Can understand your disappointment. I believe 2022 EUVs come with the dual level charging cord.
 

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I’ve got $369.96 left on my $500 EVgo credit, and I’ve never laid eyes on an EVgo charger. You can use them on ChargePoint, which is most of the chargers in my area.
Very nice, thanks! I had been wondering about this... it should work on EA also, right?
 

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As a prospective buyer myself, would you mind sharing what exactly made your installations “non standard”? I’m looking at having to run about 100ft of cable and go through a wall, but other than that it should be straightforward. Wondering if standard installation is only stupidly easy installs though.
Panel is in the basement. Wire would have to run through a drop ceiling to the attached garage. Probably a 30-40 ft run of wire and conduit. There is no room in my panel. However the two local electricians said they could install tandem breakers to free up space. The Qmerit installer said I need a new sub panel which doubled the price. There is only one Qmerit installer in my area so there is no second opinion.
 

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Panel is in the basement. Wire would have to run through a drop ceiling to the attached garage. Probably a 30-40 ft run of wire and conduit. There is no room in my panel. However the two local electricians said they could install tandem breakers to free up space.
This is exactly my scenario, except when I had my first Bolt in 2017 there was no Qmerit BS. I originally had my electrician free up a spot in my panel to run a line to the garage terminated with a 14-50R. I think it cost around $500 - 600 a few years ago. These are NJ prices, not sure where you're located.

Recently my wife decided to get an Ioniq 5 and often we'd both need to charge simultaneously, so I sprung for a new panel and service upgrade (150 to 200 A, max my meter can handle) and a new 100 A sub panel in the garage. Going to charge both cars off of the new sub panel, and keep the original 14-50 which I'll probably use for a garage heater.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Panel is in the basement. Wire would have to run through a drop ceiling to the attached garage. Probably a 30-40 ft run of wire and conduit. There is no room in my panel. However the two local electricians said they could install tandem breakers to free up space. The Qmerit installer said I need a new sub panel which doubled the price. There is only one Qmerit installer in my area so there is no second opinion.
I don't know what a "standard installation" is. Since there's a $1000 allowance, I'd guess it would be an installation that costs $1k or less, which would be a rather simple installation where the breaker panel has space for a 240 v breaker and is relatively close to the garage outlet location. My opinion is that Chevrolet had too many lawyers and perhaps some special interests involved with setting up their "free installation" program.

Interesting that the EVGO charging credit also works at ChargePoint. That expands things. I guess I might as well get the credit and see where it can be used.

I've checked into Chevy's charging cords. The Bolt EV comes with the Level 1 120 Volt cord. The EUV comes with the dual 120 Volt/240 volt cord that separately costs $450. The Chevy dealer where I bought my Bolt says that the Level 2, 240 volt 39 amp cord isn't available. There are several non-Chevy NEMA 14-50 (wall plug) to J1772 (car plug) cords available via the Internet. There are also adapters so you can charge a J1772 non-Tesla EV at a Tesla charging station.

This is an enjoyable and educational discussion. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
For Aopisa, there are voltage splitters that use a single source and split the source into two outlets. These devices would plug into the garage charger outlet and split the circuit into two charging outlets. You'd be able to charge both cars from one primary circuit. With both cars connected to the voltage splitter, one would charge, then the other. If your daily trips aren't too far, it likely would be possible to charge both cars overnight from a single circuit. These splitters cost around $350.
 

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Qmerit is not easy way to work with. I had a contractor come out to say that the cable needed was underestimated and it will cost me ~2k over the 1k discount provided by Chevrolet. Based on the numbers provided by contractor, I reached out to Qmerit again to see if there are other contractors in the area. Qmerit floated another bid for the work and a contractor reached out who agreed to do it within the 1k. Didn't spent a dime for the install. Contractor took care of all cost including inspection.

anks to the installation offer with my swapped EUV. Took the EV credits even though EVGO sites around here are garbage compared to EA. Too bad I just couldn't pocket the money and use it to cover the $ for the new wire I ran...
 
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