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Wife got her Bolt in July, and we got our Juicebox Pro shortly thereafter. Quick charges and indicated range of up to 250 miles seen. (Always 230-240 otherwise).

But 4,000 miles later, car indicates full charge, but indicated range is just 190 miles.

It lives in an attached garage where it never sees sub-freezing temps, but we are dealing with fall temperatures now. How normal is this, does it have to do with temperature, or what?

Also: I know of threads dealing with replacement of some early battery packs, but this doesn't sound like the same thing. Is there a page where I can go to enter my VIN to see if there are any recall campaigns or secret dealer warranties for our Bolt?
 

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Hard to say. 10-15% loss could happen if you had a big temperature swing.

I would also check tire pressure....as tire pressure falls gradually, range can fall with it.
 

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Wife got her Bolt in July, and we got our Juicebox Pro shortly thereafter. Quick charges and indicated range of up to 250 miles seen. (Always 230-240 otherwise).

But 4,000 miles later, car indicates full charge, but indicated range is just 190 miles.

It lives in an attached garage where it never sees sub-freezing temps, but we are dealing with fall temperatures now. How normal is this, does it have to do with temperature, or what?

Also: I know of threads dealing with replacement of some early battery packs, but this doesn't sound like the same thing. Is there a page where I can go to enter my VIN to see if there are any recall campaigns or secret dealer warranties for our Bolt?
The range is impacted drastically in cold weather, nothing wrong with the battery. Heating the car takes a large amount of energy. Blasting air conditioning has low impact on range, but heating the cabin will kill range about 30%.
 

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Wife got her Bolt in July, and we got our Juicebox Pro shortly thereafter. Quick charges and indicated range of up to 250 miles seen. (Always 230-240 otherwise).

But 4,000 miles later, car indicates full charge, but indicated range is just 190 miles.

It lives in an attached garage where it never sees sub-freezing temps, but we are dealing with fall temperatures now. How normal is this, does it have to do with temperature, or what?

Also: I know of threads dealing with replacement of some early battery packs, but this doesn't sound like the same thing. Is there a page where I can go to enter my VIN to see if there are any recall campaigns or secret dealer warranties for our Bolt?
The indicated range is a guess of your range based on what happened since your last full charge. So if you were, say, driving 75 on the freeway, running the heater, or doing other electricity intensive things, it may be basing your 90 miles on that. Temperature may also be taken into account, I think.
 

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+1 on everything mentioned above

estimate range indicated by the car varies widely and is heavily influenced by your recent past driving habits - your battery is fine - it's your estimated consumption rate that has changed…which reduced your range.
 

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The indicated range is a guess of your range based on what happened since your last full charge. So if you were, say, driving 75 on the freeway, running the heater, or doing other electricity intensive things, it may be basing your 90 miles on that. Temperature may also be taken into account, I think.
I can confirm this will happen for sure. I always do hilltop charge but even with the 90ish percent of battery my normal range is 250 - 275. However one weekend (first one temps went down a little) I went out for a MTB ride and the drive there was 90% highway. Being as I was running late I set cruise to 75 mph the whole way and used heat some. My average miles per kWh were way down compared to what I normally see. After my next charge my estimated range was only 190.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
+1 on everything mentioned above

estimate range indicated by the car varies widely and is heavily influenced by your recent past driving habits - your battery is fine - it's your estimated consumption rate that has changed…which reduced your range.
This makes sense ... thx.
 

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Yesterday was the first day of subfreezing weather here. I woke up to a low of 25F, light winds, dry. I put the car on the 240 volt charger, with the cabin heat set to 72 degrees, while I got dressed, and made coffee. I took off my stocking cap and gloves, and opened my jacket as soon as I got in the car. I left the garage at 85% charge. The thermistor in the grille said it was 45F in there. I left the heat on 72F, fan on 1, blowing on my feet. I drove the speed limit, or 2-3 mph above, to Farmville, for breakfast. These scenic state and county roads have 45-55 mph speed limits. A couple miles down the road, the outside thermistor was reading 26F. I tried using the recirculated air setting, but the windows fogged up immediately. I can only imagine this working in very arid climates. You could do it with the heat set on high, but that would defeat the goal of using less energy for heat. When I arrived at Walker's Diner, 61 miles later, it read 32F. After breakfast, I headed back home. The outside reading was 36F when I got back. Info from the car dash:

122 miles, 40.7 mph av, 3 hours, 3.6mi/kWh, 33.9 kWh, 90% for driving and accessories, 10% for climate settings, 0% for battery conditioning. The tires started at 38 psi, and never warmed up, getting only to 39 psi, instead of the 41-42 psi I was seeing in warmer weather. Being parked in an insulated garage, in the southeast, I doubt our battery will do any conditioning this winter. I was pleasantly surprised to see that driving and accessories, alone, stayed at about 4 mi/kWh. In the heat of summer, this drive would have given ~4.5mi/kWh. Greater air density, higher tire rolling resistance, and less ideal battery temperature all contributed to the small reduction in range.

From the dash data, I was able to determine that the heater pulled 1.13 kW average, for 3 hours, to maintain the car at ~40 degrees above outside temperature. Being sunny helped. Overcast days will require more heating energy. Of course, in city driving, it would look much worse, percentage wise.

If we lived in cold climes, I would be installing a propane, catalytic tent heater, secured in the backseat area. I used them years ago for winter camping, and they work great. I'd probably carry a carbon monoxide alarm too. Of course, logic dictates leaving the vent set to outside air.
 

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From the dash data, I was able to determine that the heater pulled 1.13 kW average, for 3 hours, to maintain the car at ~40 degrees above outside temperature. Being sunny helped.
Interesting report, thanks. Once you get all the interior surfaces of the car warmed up it takes a lot less energy to maintain the heat. And yeah, having that accessory thermonuclear heater pouring vast amounts of energy in through the windows helps a lot!
 

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Question: Should the 'max range' be a good indication of max battery range potential ? If, say, after a full charge, the max range shows '190 miles', is that a problem ? thanks!
 

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Question: Should the 'max range' be a good indication of max battery range potential ? If, say, after a full charge, the max range shows '190 miles', is that a problem ? thanks!
Maybe, but unlikely.
The range estimates are all based on recent driving, so less efficient driving on your last trip(s) will impact the range estimate. If your recent driving included cold, wet, windy, hilly, high speeds, heater, defrost, battery conditioning, etc will cause a decrease in the range estimate(s).
 

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Maybe, but unlikely.
The range estimates are all based on recent driving, so less efficient driving on your last trip(s) will impact the range estimate. If your recent driving included cold, wet, windy, hilly, high speeds, heater, defrost, battery conditioning, etc will cause a decrease in the range estimate(s).
I ask cos I see Max, Min, and in the middle is what seems like what you described - a range based on recent driving conditions. If that's the case, what does max and min mean ? I am guessing max means the max possible you can get in the best conditions, and the min is just the opposite.

hmm so if I am on a full charge and 'Max' shows < 200, is that something to worry about ?
 

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122 miles, 40.7 mph av, 3 hours, 3.6mi/kWh, 33.9 kWh, 90% for driving and accessories, 10% for climate settings, 0% for battery conditioning. From the dash data, I was able to determine that the heater pulled 1.13 kW average, for 3 hours, to maintain the car at ~40 degrees above outside temperature.
The heater pulls more energy than the A/C, which is interesting in itself. We are so used to the A/C being such a drag on an ICE machine, that we forget that heat is a useful free biproduct from an ICE in the winter and waste in the summer. So, in this new era of electric cars, we take a pretty good range-hit in the winter by making heat from the battery. Its actually a disadvantage of an electric car, and its going to be one reason we need more range.
 

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so what does the middle number represent ?
The middle number is the most probable range you can expect if you continue to drive as you have been driving over the most recent miles and under the most recent conditions (speed, acceleration, regen, elevation change, climate control, wind speed/direction, air temp etc.)

The computer approximates this number, taking into account what the Bolt's sensors feed it and continuously refines it, with the most recent input being weighted more than the more distant data. This is an "educated guess", which is a bit better than a SWAG. Hence, the name for that left-most display: "Guess-O-Meter."

IME, it does a decent enough job to be useful.

And MUCH better than the GOM on my electric motorcycle, which is accurate ONLY during the condition of holding a constant speed. Twist the right grip and the number instantly plunges; coast down a hill and the range suddenly goes up by a factor of 4. After 41K miles, I never look at it!
 

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The heater pulls more energy than the A/C, which is interesting in itself. We are so used to the A/C being such a drag on an ICE machine, that we forget that heat is a useful free biproduct from an ICE in the winter and waste in the summer. So, in this new era of electric cars, we take a pretty good range-hit in the winter by making heat from the battery. Its actually a disadvantage of an electric car, and its going to be one reason we need more range.
If we get range increases by improving aerodynamics, or an advance in energy density...fine. But just adding more battery decreases the overall efficiency of the vehicle. Brute force engineering is what got us where we are. Using a tiny hydrocarbon heater would have a much smaller effect on lifetime CO2.
 
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