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I could take or leave the power gadgets, but a heated windshield would be a good idea if it could be implemented at reasonable cost. Less energy wasted on defrosting would be good, but I'm not into spending $1000+ on replacing the inevitable cracked and pitted windshield after a few years of winter driving. The heat pump is a no-brainer, even though it would be ineffective in severe cold. A set of reversing valves would be cheap and would cut energy consumption and prevent significant range loss during the nearly half of the time (in most of North America) when the temperature is between 0°C and 15°C.
 

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You can always nitpick anything to death, but this is my wishlist that I think would meaningfully improve the product and attract more customers:
  • As others have mentioned, 100-150 kW fast charging, and the wiring and battery cooling to support it
  • Built-in navigation that knows how to get to EA, EvGo, and ChargePoint charging stations, and knows which ones are occupied or out of commission
  • Cabin heat pump, maybe included in a new optional "cold weather" package that includes the heated seats and steering wheel options
  • Built-in camera recording functionality, saving the footage to a plugged-in USB mass storage device
  • OTA software updates that add features and improve performance. This is going to rapidly become a competitive advantage of Tesla's if the other manufacturers don't follow suit
 

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Agreed. As batteries improve, move the Voltec up to the larger vehicles. Those are the ones which require huge batteries for good BEV range. And BEVs can trail behind with the smaller / more efficient vehicles.
A functional PHEV SUV with a decent tow rating (at least 3500 lb, preferably 5000 lb) will be a big deal, but that will require the vehicle to be able to simultaneously operate the ICE and the electric motors at maximum output for highway acceleration and hill climbing. From what I understand about voltec, it can't do that (at least not the way it was implemented in the Volt). Toyota's hybrid synergy drive can, but the marketing I have seen for the upcoming RAV4 prime emphasizes sport over utility and suggests they don't trust it for extended periods at maximum output and will give it a lowball tow rating, so it looks like that market niche will remain empty.
 

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A functional PHEV SUV with a decent tow rating (at least 3500 lb, preferably 5000 lb) will be a big deal, but that will require the vehicle to be able to simultaneously operate the ICE and the electric motors at maximum output for highway acceleration and hill climbing. From what I understand about voltec, it can't do that (at least not the way it was implemented in the Volt). Toyota's hybrid synergy drive can, but the marketing I have seen for the upcoming RAV4 prime emphasizes sport over utility and suggests they don't trust it for extended periods at maximum output and will give it a lowball tow rating, so it looks like that market niche will remain empty.
The Volt initially was not supposed to be able to use the ICE in conjunction with the Electric motors... but in reality it could... they used what ever configuration gave the most efficiency. That is why people argue endlessly over weather it is "just" a plug in hybrid or was actually an EREV (Extended Range Electric Vehicle). The exact same drivetrain was used in the Cadillac ELR, and they used this feature to significantly improve the performance at any speed when in sport mode in the later years of the Cadillac.

I want to see the drivetrain you are talking about in a motor home. A large motor home that gets 25+ mpg instead of less than 10 would be great, and you could charge up the battery over night at a camp site. You could use "hold mode" to keep the battery full when you were planning to do your camping at areas more remote, so you could run everything in the camper off of the battery without having to use the ICE engine for power.

Keith
 

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I'm watching the GM pickup, hoping they will offer a low cost option besides the usual multimotor 0 to 60 in nanoseconds model. A 0 - 60 time of 10 seconds would be fine with 350 - 400 mile range, 120VAC outlet, separate heat and AC controls, heat pump with resistive heating backup. Make it more aerodynamic than the usual brick pu style. Two wheel drive, 4wd as an option maybe. DCFC charging as standard, >75kW up to at least 65% charge. Standard pu ground clearance and approach/departure angles. Best for me would be a small pu like the 1990's Toyota or Isuzu, but more aero to achieve a given range with smaller battery.
 

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I'm watching the GM pickup, hoping they will offer a low cost option besides the usual multimotor 0 to 60 in nanoseconds model. A 0 - 60 time of 10 seconds would be fine with 350 - 400 mile range, 120VAC outlet, separate heat and AC controls, heat pump with resistive heating backup. Make it more aerodynamic than the usual brick pu style. Two wheel drive, 4wd as an option maybe. DCFC charging as standard, >75kW up to at least 65% charge. Standard pu ground clearance and approach/departure angles. Best for me would be a small pu like the 1990's Toyota or Isuzu, but more aero to achieve a given range with smaller battery.
In other words, a late 90's early 00's Ford Ranger EV with modern technology.

Keith
 

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Link for those who forgot what it {the Jolt} looked like,,,

Quoted in the article:
"Chevy's current EV lineup, even with the new Bolt, is pretty staid and practical. That's okay, but at some point we'll need the Ford Mustang of EVs: an affordable and exciting electric car."
At least somebody was listening, evidently not GM. I guess they should have said Camaro.
 

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What I actually would want from the next GM BEV is something that builds off of the practicality of the Bolt.
Although I treat my Bolt like a mini-SUV, it really is not an SUV, just an incredibly handy (and sporty) hatchback.
I would definitely appreciate a larger SUV-type car, or would even accept a small pickup truck.
I would like the option for a larger battery and definitely an increased CCS charge rate.
What I don't want is a 400 hp performance sports utility. I'm quite ok with power in scale with the Bolt's performance.
What I really, really don't want is a 1,000 hp Hummer behemoth.
 

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What I actually would want from the next GM BEV is something that builds off of the practicality of the Bolt.
Although I treat my Bolt like a mini-SUV, it really is not an SUV, just an incredibly handy (and sporty) hatchback.
I would definitely appreciate a larger SUV-type car, or would even accept a small pickup truck.
I would like the option for a larger battery and definitely an increased CCS charge rate.
What I don't want is a 400 hp performance sports utility. I'm quite ok with power in scale with the Bolt's performance.
What I really, really don't want is a 1,000 hp Hummer behemoth.
Yup, I would love to have the equivelent of the Ford ranger EV, or Chevy S10 EV of the past with modern technology. I want a single cab (two buckets, or bench for 3 passengers) and would like at minimum a 6.5' bed with one of those cage things that goes around the back when you have the tailgate down to extend it to 8'. If I am driving this this cross country it is to pick something up in the bed, or haul something on a trailer so it needs 300 miles of range (around 200 miles unladen at highway speeds on an 80% charge, 100 miles at highway speeds with a trailer / heavy load in the bed) with 150 KW charging with minimal taper until 80% SOC.

I don't need it to do 0-60 in 3.2 seconds.... if I want a toy it will be something other than a pickup truck.

Keith
 

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The good news is that if you want a electric CUV, or an SUV, or a large pickup, there are going to be plenty of new options over the next couple of years (though probably not so many from GM).

What there won't be are sedans, hatchbacks that aren't tarted up to look like CUVs, or sports vehicles (two seaters, coupes etc.).

The future may be electric, but it's also big, heavy and fairly ugly.
 

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The good news is that if you want a electric CUV, or an SUV, or a large pickup, there are going to be plenty of new options over the next couple of years (though probably not so many from GM).

What there won't be are sedans, hatchbacks that aren't tarted up to look like CUVs, or sports vehicles (two seaters, coupes etc.).

The future may be electric, but it's also big, heavy and fairly ugly.
I'm still coming to terms with this. I really want both - a large family vehicle and a small sporty 2-seater sports car (or at least a 2+2 sports coupe). The former is coming. The latter is all but dead. The sole glimmer of hope I see is the upcoming Mini Cooper. But that will be short range. I guess that's ok for a fun weekend driver.
 

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I discovered the Ioniq EV a couple weeks ago. Somehow I had heard of it but always dismissed it for some reason. The 2020 version should be out soon in CARB markets, and the range is bumped up to 170 miles. It's a hatchback, or lift back, or station wagon, or whatever you call it. I don't know how to distinguish between those except that they aren't a traditional trunk (boot). That seems like the sweet spot for me. It would cover local trips and anything between Portland/Eugene, Coast and Mt. Hood, which encompasses 99% of the trips.
 

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The Ioniq was actually my top choice over the Bolt when I decided to get an EV. However I went with the Bolt in the end for a few reasons:
  • The Ioniq is not actually sold where I live and the user marked is practically non-existent
  • With no dealership support, repair propositions would be dicey
  • The new 2020 model charges much slower than the 2019 model (and slowee than the Bolt), making it totally useless for longish trips, which makes its increased range also pretty useless and not worth spending an extra $3k on
  • The new 2020 model has horrible touch-sensitive buttons
A used 2019 model looked like a great buy as a second city car, but I couldn't actually find any of them.
 

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The good news is that if you want a electric CUV, or an SUV, or a large pickup, there are going to be plenty of new options over the next couple of years (though probably not so many from GM).

What there won't be are sedans, hatchbacks that aren't tarted up to look like CUVs, or sports vehicles (two seaters, coupes etc.).

The future may be electric, but it's also big, heavy and fairly ugly.

Unfortunately, batteries are big and heavy. There will be some incremental improvements, but unless there is a major change in chemistry, car designs will always need to work around the battery pack and that will preclude lightweight, low profile sports cars.
Fortunately, the high torque of electric motors and low center of gravity of a bottom mounted battery pack will still allow for cars with the capabilities of a classic low profile, light weight sports car, and the need for good aerodynamics will prevent manufacturers from going too far down the ugly road.
 

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Unfortunately, batteries are big and heavy. There will be some incremental improvements, but unless there is a major change in chemistry, car designs will always need to work around the battery pack and that will preclude lightweight, low profile sports cars.
Keep hoping for some big improvement around the corner. So far my car seems better for around town than anything. right now around town is 100% of my life. It will continue to suit my life but I am hoping to retire in around 5 years. Hoping for something with 400-500 miles range by then. That may be unrealistic expectations though.
 

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Hoping for something with 400-500 miles range by then. That may be unrealistic expectations though.
Why though? Do you drive 400 miles continuously without stop? A Tesla can recharge pretty darn quickly, and there's no sense paying for and lugging around way more battery than you normally use.

The CyberTruck will have a 400+ option in a couple years, so there you go. It won't gain miles recharging as quickly as other models because it won't be as aerodynamically efficient as a Model S or 3. You'll get an initially high range and then wait an eternity to recharge.

I'd much rather have a ~200 mile vehicle that can rapidly recharge. Cheaper, lighter weight, better for the environment.
 

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Why though? Do you drive 400 miles continuously without stop? A Tesla can recharge pretty darn quickly, and there's no sense paying for and lugging around way more battery than you normally use.
3 things come to mind;
#1. longer range = better resale value.
#2. longer range= less time on the road recharging and less charging stops.
#3. longer range= less range anxiety (oh look it got very cold and now the only DCFC is occupied blocked or broken... gotta drive another 100 miles to the next one if am I even able to make it)?
Also regarding the desire for 400-500 miles - I don't really care how they get to that number. If it's a much larger cheaper to produce battery that's ok. If it's a combo of bigger battery, +lighter materials+aero +more efficient motors / electronics + integrated solar replenishment that's good too. The light year 1 sure had my eyes popping until I saw the pricing 130-170K. Just about at a 500 mile range though. Of course all the new tech is premium priced. Hopefully in 5-10 years it no longer is.
 

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We can dream about what it would take to replace our other cars with EVs, but vehicles that can haul a bunch of stuff a long way not only need more batteries, but more high power charging infrastructure. There are large areas where even 50 kW DCFC is hard to find, nevermind the 200+ kW that would be needed to charge a 400 mile range pickup in a reasonable time. Instead of using battery cost reductions to scale vehicles up, how about working on cutting the costs of the rest of the car too? The estimates of the Bolt's battery pack costing $9000 also suggest that the battery is only 1/3 of the cost of manufacturing the car. There are ICE cars that retail for less than the $18,000 that it supposedly costs to build a Bolt without a battery.
City commuter vehicles that get plugged in at home every night have always been the low hanging fruit, and even there the EV market share is still small. If GM wants to sell EVs, how about a 150 mile Bolt-like commuter car with a MSRP under $20,000, or a 100 mile car for under $15,000?
 

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City commuter vehicles that get plugged in at home every night have always been the low hanging fruit, and even there the EV market share is still small. If GM wants to sell EVs, how about a 150 mile Bolt-like commuter car with a MSRP under $20,000, or a 100 mile car for under $15,000?
I would not be surprised if we see that in the next 5 years. GM's BEV3 (Bolt is using BEV2) is designed to be modular and perhaps GM can offer 3 trims: City (150 miles), State (250 miles), Cross Country (350 miles).

Toyota's roadmap (2017):
 
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