Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

81 - 98 of 98 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
P.S. I installed a smoke detector 6 inches above the plug. Just in case. I know, it wont help if no one is home
Just wanted to point out there are wifi connected smoke detectors now that can send alerts when you aren't home. I don't own one so I can't speak to their use, but if I had one, I'd have a neighbor check things out if I got an alert while away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Have 2 chargers for a plug-in hybrid and my Bolt, a Siemens (5 years old in January) and a Juice Box (3 years old this past April). No problems with either. And I have 27,000 miles on the hybrid that are 90% electric and 38,000 miles on the Bolt, and both are only ever charged at home. Bad chargers? Bad electrician? This doesn't appear to be happening with just one brand of charger, so it is puzzling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
This doesn't appear to be happening with just one brand of charger, so it is puzzling
It's caused by a poor connection with the outlet. It could have been lose from the beginning (less likely) or became lose over time (more likely). It's very important the EVSE be secured near the outlet rather than dangle or otherwise disturb the plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
You'd think there'd be some kind of local breaker on these sockets that would trip under high heat detection.
There is such a thing on the EVSE that came with my car but that, I presume, is because it has a standard 120v plug and dodgy 120v receptacles are all over the place. Larger 240v receptacles should be better but manufacturers might get away with shoddy receptacles that are used for ranges or dryers, rarely plugged and unplugged or rarely used to anywhere near capacity or both. Anyway, I think I'll keep the area around my receptacle clear of flammables. The device on the plug that came with the car probably only interrupts one leg as the other is presumed to be neutral (an issue for using it at 240v, you need to remember that just because the EVSE isn't working, it doesn't necessarily mean it isn't energized). A common trip of both legs would be required of any device designed to use 240v.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
what brand is that outlet? I cant quite make it out.
I purchased what
I hope was a higher quality Nema 6-50 when I did mine (hubbell/bryant?); but i really dont know how it will hold up over time. I know i looked at the leviton's and was like "nope".

P.S. your outlet is a nema 6-50 by the way, not a 14-50, so if replacing, make sure you get the correct one.

Hard to tell, but in my very untrained eyes, it appears your issue was caused more from the plug than the receptacle wire overheating. Anyone with knowledge have insight just from looking at the melt points?
Yes, the wall plug is NEMA 6-50, Leviton, Installed by electrician. The supply wire is nice, 8 AWG. I totally agree that a much more robust plug is needed, or better yet, hardwire. The new Leviton plug is in place, will check the connections after a few charge cycles.
That aside, the over-molded power plug from ChargePoint does seem to be the failure point. They do not offer this as a spare parts.... Looking a replacing the whole unit.

I have had this charger and plug in use 2 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
My CC 24 amp EVSE uses 14 gauge wire. That would be substandard for building wiring (max of 15 amps for 14 gauge) but the rules are different for appliances. I'm sure the wires heat up appreciably when charging and so there's going to be significant thermal expansion at the connections. They should be soldered, in my opinion. If they were only crimped, that could be the problem. Mine is a hard wire unit (that's why I know the wire size), but I connected it to my own plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,688 Posts
Just wanted to point out there are wifi connected smoke detectors now that can send alerts when you aren't home. I don't own one so I can't speak to their use, but if I had one, I'd have a neighbor check things out if I got an alert while away.
I have them. They're from Nest, and work very well. They test themselves monthly. Pricey, but the ultimate in fire, smoke and CO protection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
I have them. They're from Nest, and work very well. They test themselves monthly. Pricey, but the ultimate in fire, smoke and CO protection.
I know technology like this normally becomes obsolete rather quickly, but for some reason I can't get over the fact that the sensor will only last 10 years as the radioactive decay renders it inoperable. Somehow having an expiration date makes me not want to plunk down the cash. Perhaps it's worthwhile to me to have just 1 smart detector in a central (high) location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
It seems like smoke detectors aren't recommended in garages because the heat / cold experienced in the garage may go outside of the recommended limits of the detector (especially here in the coastal northeast), and also excessive dust is mentioned.

I'd like to put a smoke detector in the garage near my EVSE, but I'm only seeing "heat detectors" recommended for garages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,824 Posts
I know technology like this normally becomes obsolete rather quickly, but for some reason I can't get over the fact that the sensor will only last 10 years as the radioactive decay renders it inoperable. Somehow having an expiration date makes me not want to plunk down the cash.
I hope you're able to go through life without purchasing a smart phone...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,460 Posts
I hope you're able to go through life without purchasing a smart phone...
I bought my first flip phone about 15 years ago. I had that until just over two years ago when I traded it for a $200 Android phone so I could run Torque Pro. The nice thing about it is I can replace the battery when it dies about year five.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,824 Posts
I bought my first flip phone about 15 years ago. I had that until just over two years ago when I traded it for a $200 Android phone so I could run Torque Pro. The nice thing about it is I can replace the battery when it dies about year five.
Better stock up on batteries, charge them to 50%, and stick them in the fridge. The reason I had to upgrade from my first smart phone was that I could no longer find batteries for it after 5 years of ownership...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,460 Posts
Better stock up on batteries, charge them to 50%, and stick them in the fridge. The reason I had to upgrade from my first smart phone was that I could no longer find batteries for it after 5 years of ownership...
Thanks for the heads up. Planned obsolescence. I will probably do just that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,460 Posts
Decent smart phones are cheap. Used flagships are pretty affordable too. Might as well get a new one every few years when the battery fades too much. Both Apple and Android make migrating handsets easy.
Everybody has their own priorities. One of my goals is trying to reduce the amount of garbage I generate over my lifetime. It is hard to do in probably the most consumption driven country on the planet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
Everybody has their own priorities. One of my goals is trying to reduce the amount of garbage I generate over my lifetime. It is hard to do in probably the most consumption driven country on the planet.
I buy 1 generation old (used) flagship phones for my wife, but my motivation is to save money. You might consider purchasing a used phone every 2 years to be a way to keep current on tech without consuming new materials. We don't game on the phones, so the main improvement over the generations is camera quality.
 
81 - 98 of 98 Posts
Top