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Ha! I live in Central Oregon, land of the huge pickup truck. I picked up my free cargo mat from local dealer (using chevy points) last year and out of curiosity asked the 'service' dudes behind me if they do anything with the Bolt knowing that the answer was no way in ****. They essentially gave me weird blank stares like I was talking gibberish. One finally spoke up saying since the Bolt is a limited production 'test' vehicle, they have no reason to service it. Uh-huh. The parking lot is chock full of them humongous trucks with stickers $55K - $75K.
Put an EV charger in the parking lot?
  • That would admit defeat for them I would think.
  • I would assume the charger would be, take your pick: ICE'd/Off/Broken. Not worth the hassle to find out and possibly have to fend off salesmen.
  • I also think they get a very large amount of revenue from the service department... not gonna happen with EV's.
It's OK since we have a Chargepoint set of chargers in downtown and at the south end of town a set of EA chargers are supposedly getting installed at the (wait for it) Walmart superstore.
Maybe someday in the 'future'?
 

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I'd love to see 50Kw that actually delivered 50kW ;) ... frustrating pulling up and only get 25 -30
A 50 KW station will never deliver 50 KW due to the naming scheme. That 50 KW is a theoretical power value delivered into a 500 volt battery pack. Problem is that there are no 500 volt battery packs.

Pay attention to the current, which is constant regardless of the pack voltage. You get this by dividing the nameplate KW value by the theoretical 500 V. So a 50 kW station delivers 50,000/500 -> 100 amps. The maximum value you'll ever get with 100 amps is about 400 volts * 100 amps -> 40 kW. And if the battery is at 340 volts, only expect 34 KW to be delivered.

Essentially to get full power on a Bolt you need a 150 amp station which would translate to 75 KW nameplate. So, look for 100 KW (200 amp) stations to deliver the power you expect.

ga2500ev
 

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Ha! I live in Central Oregon, land of the huge pickup truck. I picked up my free cargo mat from local dealer (using chevy points) last year and out of curiosity asked the 'service' dudes behind me if they do anything with the Bolt knowing that the answer was no way in ****. They essentially gave me weird blank stares like I was talking gibberish. One finally spoke up saying since the Bolt is a limited production 'test' vehicle, they have no reason to service it. Uh-huh. The parking lot is chock full of them humongous trucks with stickers $55K - $75K.
Put an EV charger in the parking lot?
  • That would admit defeat for them I would think.
  • I would assume the charger would be, take your pick: ICE'd/Off/Broken. Not worth the hassle to find out and possibly have to fend off salesmen.
  • I also think they get a very large amount of revenue from the service department... not gonna happen with EV's.
It's OK since we have a Chargepoint set of chargers in downtown and at the south end of town a set of EA chargers are supposedly getting installed at the (wait for it) Walmart superstore.
Maybe someday in the 'future'?
Show those doofus's this article. Whether they like it or not they are coming and in 5 years the dealer models will be changing.


Craig
 

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A 50 KW station will never deliver 50 KW due to the naming scheme. That 50 KW is a theoretical power value delivered into a 500 volt battery pack. Problem is that there are no 500 volt battery packs.

Pay attention to the current, which is constant regardless of the pack voltage. You get this by dividing the nameplate KW value by the theoretical 500 V. So a 50 kW station delivers 50,000/500 -> 100 amps. The maximum value you'll ever get with 100 amps is about 400 volts * 100 amps -> 40 kW. And if the battery is at 340 volts, only expect 34 KW to be delivered.

Essentially to get full power on a Bolt you need a 150 amp station which would translate to 75 KW nameplate. So, look for 100 KW (200 amp) stations to deliver the power you expect.

ga2500ev
I wouldn't say never. A lot of it depends on the vehicle's voltage. Because many of the "50 kW" chargers are actually 500 V and 125 A, an EV with a nominal voltage around 400 V (the Bolt EV's is 350 V) could see a true 50 kW charging rate.
 

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One of my favorite places to visit is the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. There are zero DCFC stations there, but checking a map of Chevy dealers, just about every place I wish a charger existed, has a Chevy dealer.
Of course what I want are 150 kW chargers with 24/7 access, and they don't even have to be free.
UP is one of my favorite places too. It'd be nice to have a charge network of DCFC locations we could depend on up there. Been thinking of buying a place near Munising. I was originally a troll. Now a Floridian.
 

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UP is one of my favorite places too. It'd be nice to have a charge network of DCFC locations we could depend on up there. Been thinking of buying a place near Munising. I was originally a troll. Now a Floridian.
Luckily, it looks like help is on the way...

31732
 

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A 50 KW station will never deliver 50 KW due to the naming scheme.
Essentially to get full power on a Bolt you need a 150 amp station which would translate to 75 KW nameplate.
ChargePoint's new stations that are labeled 62kw deliver 150 amps. I agree with you, there needs to be more concise labeling industry wide.
 
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Eventually with future plug to charge, Chevy can install smart EVSE that gives only GM vehicles free charging on dealer 25 or 50 Kw charger. There could be a monthly limit for free charging, let's say 100 kWh, then charge the user after that. Perhaps even add this to their OnStar plan.
 
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Discussion Starter #29
Eventually with future plug to charge, Chevy can install smart EVSE that gives only GM vehicles free charging on dealer 25 or 50 Kw charger. There could be a monthly limit for free charging, let's say 100 kWh, then charge the user after that. Perhaps even add this to their OnStar plan.

Ohhh "add to OnStar plan".... I Iike it


OnStar pretty much sucks as is but if it included a Monthly EV Charging Subscription plan..I'd actually consider it.
 

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Ohhh "add to OnStar plan".... I Iike it


OnStar pretty much sucks as is but if it included a Monthly EV Charging Subscription plan..I'd actually consider it.
Agreed, a Plug & Charge feature added to one of the paid plans and I would be in like Flynn. Particularly if it meant aggregating public charging to a once a month true up.
 

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ChargePoint's new stations that are labeled 62kw deliver 150 amps. I agree with you, there needs to be more concise labeling industry wide.
They should have used amps because amps are constant until taper. Or conversely since virtually every production EV taps out at about 350V (E-tron excluded), that a KW rating at 350 volts would have been much more representative of the utility of the station.

ga2500ev
 

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ChargePoint's new stations that are labeled 62kw deliver 150 amps. I agree with you, there needs to be more concise labeling industry wide.
BTW if your read the specs carefully those chargepoint stations deliver a maximum of 150 amps or a maximum of 62.5 kW, but doesn't deliver both together. But it is enough to top out the Bolt at its top number of 55-56 KW.

ga2500ev
 

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Charging stations at dealerships would be great if they were placed in an obvious and convenient location, were not used generally for dealership charging and were always available. Just a 24 kW charger would be very useful, likely best ... cheaper to install yet very useful when there are no convenient alternatives, and it could provide just the needed lifeline to get to those 350 kW chargers that everyone seems to think they need. Require a normal, not exorbitant, charge to let dealerships recover some of the cost and keep freeloaders at bay. The EV travel picture even now would look a lot different if all dealerships had such a charger. But, "chargers at all dealerships" likely means L2.
 

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Does anyone know more details about the plan yet? I would assume 1 24Kw Bosch charger per each dealer like they currently have (very similar to Harley Davidson "slow" DCFC) definitely better than L2 and if it's free You can't beat the pricing!
 

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Ohhh "add to OnStar plan".... I Iike it

OnStar pretty much sucks as is but if it included a Monthly EV Charging Subscription plan..I'd actually consider it.
If the Safety and Security Plan included free 25 kW charging at GM dealerships, there may be more subscribers. I know I would likely sign up for road trips.
 

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I also think they get a very large amount of revenue from the service department... not gonna happen with EV's.
Is that really true? Things I have had go wrong on prior cars are mostly still things that exist on EVs. Seat adjustment motors (not on my Bolt, but on many EVs), air conditioning systems (nothing is magic about the one in the Bolt right?). Sure the engine is dramatically simpler, but the rest of the car is still a car. Plenty to need fixing from time to time.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Ohhh "add to OnStar plan".... I Iike it


OnStar pretty much sucks as is but if it included a Monthly EV Charging Subscription plan..I'd actually consider it.
Pwang
Eventually with future plug to charge, Chevy can install smart EVSE that gives only GM vehicles free charging on dealer 25 or 50 Kw charger. There could be a monthly limit for free charging, let's say 100 kWh, then charge the user after that. Perhaps even add this to their OnStar plan.
Should pass this on to the Chevy MyLink person that posted on the forum a fe wmonths back
If the Safety and Security Plan included free 25 kW charging at GM dealerships, there may be more subscribers. I know I would likely sign up for road trips.
You should post that to the MyChevy Link guy (I'll try to find the link to his thread)..perhaps he is in a position to pass that Idea on.
 

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I wouldn't say never. A lot of it depends on the vehicle's voltage. Because many of the "50 kW" chargers are actually 500 V and 125 A, an EV with a nominal voltage around 400 V (the Bolt EV's is 350 V) could see a true 50 kW charging rate.
The one time I used a 50kW unit (EVGo), it displayed that it was delivering 44kW.
 

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One of my favorite places to visit is the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. There are zero DCFC stations there, but checking a map of Chevy dealers, just about every place I wish a charger existed, has a Chevy dealer.
Of course what I want are 150 kW chargers with 24/7 access, and they don't even have to be free.
I can only get to Marquette MI using Frank Porth Chev's 25kw DCFC in Crivitz WI. So the chevy dealer network has come through for me. More chargers in northern wisconsn and Upper Michigan would help a lot.
 

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I can only get to Marquette MI using Frank Porth Chev's 25kw DCFC in Crivitz WI. So the chevy dealer network has come through for me. More chargers in northern wisconsn and Upper Michigan would help a lot.
I live in mid lower peninsula so the sensible route to the UP is northbound I-75 over the Mackinaw Bridge (hence the term "troll', I live under the bridge LOL). Where would I want chargers?
St. Ignace
Sault Ste. Marie (American side)
Manistique
Escanaba
Menominee/Marinette
Marquette
Houghton Hancock

Then there's the question of whether an EV makes sense at all for a full time UP resident. It's 4WD, winter tire, heat on, territory.
31740
 
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