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Discussion Starter #1
Got my car today. Came home and hooked up to 110V garage outlet. Noticed that my GFCI had to be reset. I had found it tripped on other occasions so I just reset it and didn't think much about it. Charged for a few hours then made a trip to town and got back after dark. Decided to change my amp setting to 12 amps. Got in the house when I started hearing the car beeping. The GFCI was tripped. So I got back in the car and reset the amp back to 8 and thought that it was odd that would trip the GFCI. Then I remembered we had wiring issues after our house was built and had to have the electrician make changes. Now I think the ghosts of wiring past is haunting me. I turned the lights on in the garage and the GFCI tripped again with the setting on 8 amps. Then I unplugged the car and the GFCI tripped when I flipped the lights on. Didn't happen the first time I got home because it was during the day and I wasn't turning the lights on. Well drats. Every time the lights get turned on the GFCI trips with the charger plugged in. Doesn't matter if the car is plugged in or what the amp setting is set at. So I did what any other red blooded Bolt owner who wants his car to charge through the night, I removed the offending GFCI and have no further issues with the 12 amp setting.

Anyone have any GFCI issues with their charger?
 

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So you plugged into a GFCI outlet (I don't think you specified)? I think the manual warns you against doing that. In general GFCI outlets are quirky, and at any rate they don't like high current loads and will trip, buzz or have other oddball behavior. Plug it into a non GFCI. The car already has it's own GFCI onboard.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So you plugged into a GFCI outlet (I don't think you specified)? I think the manual warns you against doing that. In general GFCI outlets are quirky, and at any rate they don't like high current loads and will trip, buzz or have other oddball behavior. Plug it into a non GFCI. The car already has it's own GFCI onboard.
All standard garage outlets are required to be on a GFCI. At least in my state's electrical code. I haven't read the NEC code book in awhile but thought it is required in lower 48 at least. There's one GFCI outlet in the circuit so all outlets are protected. So any plug in my garage, outdoors, kitchen, and bathrooms are on GFCI. My issue occurred even when the car wasn't plugged in, just the L1 EVSE. So current draw didn't appear to be a factor. And the garage lights are on a different circuit to boot. I do have all the four foot fixtures converted to electronic ballasts with LEDs. Too much noise on the ground? Note: car did make it through the night on 12 amps after removing the GFCI from the circuit. So I'm all smiles this AM
 

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Outlets for Level 2 EVSE (excludes the provided 120 volt EVSE with 12 amp max) are supposed to be on a dedicated circuit with its own (40 amp, usually) breaker. There ARE GFCI circuit breakers, but none of the EVSE installations of which I am aware require you to use a GFCI breaker. You said one outlet in the existing garage circuit has the GFCI and feel that even if you run an individual circuit to a dedicated EVSE outlet, that TOO has to have GFCI. If that is the law, I do not know how to do it without breaking the law, but there must be a way. The outlet for my EVSE had to be installed at least 48 inches above the ground. Could the height of the outlet be a factor?
 

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Every state is different, but I know my home (GA) our garage has 2 outlets and both have a GFCI. Our house also have outlets outside. One GFCI is also wired for the backyard and the Front are wired to the other GFCI. I would see what other appliances are wired in to that circuit. Phantom GFCI trips are more frequent the more outlets are wired to the circuit (or so Google says). So I would start to find some of the home wiring suspect.

We are lucky that the breaker box is in the garage so we are just adding a 240V outlet made even easier by replacing our range and clothes dryer with gas (plenty of free space and load on the panel). If we were not adding a Level 2, we were going to add a dedicated 120V outlet for the L1 charger. This would at least reduce the risk of the GFCI tripping.
 

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It might be that the GFCI outlet itself is bad.

Try replacing it with another one, and if the behavior continues you likely have a wiring problem that should be addressed. Noise on the ground should not affect a GFCI (a GFCI will operate properly on a circuit without a ground at all). It only compares the hot and neutral legs - if the difference is >5mA, the GFCI will trip.

Given the wiring problems you had with the house, it is possible that the neutral on the GFCI circuit is shared with at least one other circuit (garage lights?) "downstream" of the GFCI. Some electricians routinely tie all the neutrals together that enter a box (maybe the box for the garage light switch?), but GFCI circuits need to be kept separate.

If a shared neutral is the root of the problem, running without GFCI will work, but keep in mind there is a very good reason certain outlets are required to be protected.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My furnace in the garage gets around the GFCI requirements by having a dedicated circuit and a special plug that prevents someone using it with residential electric appliances.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Given the wiring problems you had with the house, it is possible that the neutral on the GFCI circuit is shared with at least one other circuit (garage lights?) "downstream" of the GFCI. Some electricians routinely tie all the neutrals together that enter a box (maybe the box for the garage light switch?), but GFCI circuits need to be kept separate.
I suspect you're correct. I'll probably try a new GFCI as their inexpensive. Glad I opened the GFCI up as one of the hot wires pulled out. My new car may have prevented a serious issue with an improperly tightened terminal. Now I wonder about the rest of the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It might be that the GFCI outlet itself is bad.

Try replacing it with another one, and if the behavior continues you likely have a wiring problem that should be addressed.
An update: Now that I've installed a dedicated 240V circuit for the car, I revisited the GFCI issue. I installed a new GFCI and it solved the original problem. Works without issue. So it was a bad GFCI. Also bought a $10 circuit tester to verify wiring was correct.
 

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Also having trouble with charger cord trip GFCI breaker

I have been having trouble with my Bolt's factory 120 volt EVSE cord tripping the CFCI breaker in my garage about one in three times when I connect the cord's J1772 connector to the scoket on the car. The car is set to pull 12 amps, and the car charger is the only thing plugged into the circuit, which has a 20 amp breaker at the main panel. The GFCI is contained in one of the garage outlets. The EVSE cord normally stays plugged in all the time. It seems the CFCI usually trips immediately or within a few minutes of connecting to the car. I have verified the socket on the car is not damp with water.

I previously had a Nissan LEAF with a 120 volt EVSE cord that appeared to be made by Aerovironment. The LEAF charged at 12 amps and never tripped the GFCI in the four years I had the LEAF. Unfortunately, the LEAF's EVSE cord was sold with the car, so I have only the Chevy (appears to be made by Clipper Creek) available for testing.

I am planning to give Chevrolet a call to ask about the problem. Has anybody else who has had problems with the Bolt's included 120 volt EVSE cord tripping GFCIs been able to find a resolution? Electical code requires the garage outlets to be GFCI protected, so removing the GFCI is not an allowable option.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Has anybody else had problems with the Bolt's included 120 volt EVSE cord tripping GFCIs? If so, have you been able to find a resolution? Electical code requires the garage outlets to be GFCI protected, so removing the GFCI is not an allowable option.
I had this problem when I first got the Bolt. Mine tripped when I turned the garage lights on. And the lights were on a different circuit. I ended up replacing the GFCI with a new one and it fixed it. Good thing I fixed it because the wife ended up using the spare refrigerator in the garage for Thanksgiving. So my Bolt saved Thanksgiving!

The GFCI's are pretty cheap so it is worth giving it a try. I'm assuming you're getting a green light on the EVSE prior to plugging it into the car? The green light indicates that you have a good ground.
 

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I can’t say In your case, but most problems I encounter with GFI plugs are solved by replacing the GFI

Does the car EVSE pop all GFI plugs or only the one?
 

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Thanks forum members for your suggestions.

There are two 120 duplex outlets on the circuit. One outlet has the GFCI buit in, and the other outlet is fed from the output side of the GFCI of the first outlet. They are the only items on the circuit, which has its own 20 amp breaker in the service panel. For now, the Bolt's charger is the only load attached to the circuit.

I never had any problems on this circuit when I had tbe Nissan LEAF and its associated charger. It is when I got the Chevy Bolt last month that the GFCI started tripping about every third time I attach the car to the charger's cable. I can leave the charger itself plugged in indefinitely, and that seems not to cause problems. The GFCI trips right when I connect the car or very soon after.

Since a GFCI is relatively inexpensive, I'll try replacing it. If that doesn't help, I'll check with the city's electrical inspector to see if I can install a crowfoot or some other type of dedicated non-GFCI outlet that would preclude plugging in a typical appliance, and then use an adapter on the Bolt's charger for the dedicated outlet.
 

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All standard garage outlets are required to be on a GFCI. At least in my state's electrical code. I haven't read the NEC code book in awhile but thought it is required in lower 48 at least. There's one GFCI outlet in the circuit so all outlets are protected. So any plug in my garage, outdoors, kitchen, and bathrooms are on GFCI. My issue occurred even when the car wasn't plugged in, just the L1 EVSE. So current draw didn't appear to be a factor. And the garage lights are on a different circuit to boot. I do have all the four foot fixtures converted to electronic ballasts with LEDs. Too much noise on the ground? Note: car did make it through the night on 12 amps after removing the GFCI from the circuit. So I'm all smiles this AM
Your understanding of code is not correct. GFCI protection is not required for receptacles that are not readily accessible, such as a ceiling-mounted receptacle for a garage door opener. Nor are they required for a receptacle on a dedicated branch circuit located and identified for a cord-and-plug-connected appliance, such as a refrigerator or freezer.

So any circuit and/or plug you would get installed for a L2 EVSE is not required to be GFCI protected.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Your understanding of code is not correct. GFCI protection is not required for receptacles that are not readily accessible, such as a ceiling-mounted receptacle for a garage door opener. Nor are they required for a receptacle on a dedicated branch circuit located and identified for a cord-and-plug-connected appliance, such as a refrigerator or freezer.

So any circuit and/or plug you would get installed for a L2 EVSE is not required to be GFCI protected.
Thanks for the additional information. I knew there were exceptions as my furnace in the garage is not GFCI. I covered my arse by stating "standard" outlets in the garage are on GFCI. When I installed the new GFCI I also saw where the garage door opener outlets on the same circuit bypassed the GFCI. I also didn't put the new dedicated 240V install for the Bolt on GFCI as you stated. Thanks again for the clarification though as we all need to make sure we're getting the right info out to everyone.
 

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Thanks for the additional information. I knew there were exceptions as my furnace in the garage is not GFCI. I covered my arse by stating "standard" outlets in the garage are on GFCI. When I installed the new GFCI I also saw where the garage door opener outlets on the same circuit bypassed the GFCI. I also didn't put the new dedicated 240V install for the Bolt on GFCI as you stated. Thanks again for the clarification though as we all need to make sure we're getting the right info out to everyone.
It's all good. I can't claim to know all the different building codes out there either. :)

As you said, just want to make sure it is clear for anyone else who follows and needs to learn :)
 

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I've run-ins before with the somewhat over zealous electrical inspectors where I live complaining about things that aren't really code violations. I have a feeling that trying to get an inspector to understand the EVSE and car have safety measures of their own could prove a challenge, and would be best avoided unless necessary (as in allowing me to install a dedicated non GFI receptacle).

The GFCI in my garage was an older Pass & Seymour device (~30 years). I had a spare new Leviton GFCI in my parts cabinet, so I swapped it for the old P&S device. We'll see if the Leviton is less trigger happy.
 

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I have a similar problem with a dedicated GFCI to my heated bathroom floor. That GFCI never tripped until I installed a Level 2 EVSE and charged my car on its dedicated circuit. All wiring checked out to be correct. I even installed a plastic/rubber floor under the Bolt and it still tripped when both independent circuits were drawing current. I had a Tesla owner bring his car over to see if it would trip when his was charging and it did not trip. Thus, there is something going on between the Bolt and Clipper Creek charger that is creating some "noise" in the panel. I've got a call into Clipper Creek and visit to Chevy on my schedule for tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I have a similar problem with a dedicated GFCI to my heated bathroom floor. That GFCI never tripped until I installed a Level 2 EVSE and charged my car on its dedicated circuit. All wiring checked out to be correct. I even installed a plastic/rubber floor under the Bolt and it still tripped when both independent circuits were drawing current. I had a Tesla owner bring his car over to see if it would trip when his was charging and it did not trip. Thus, there is something going on between the Bolt and Clipper Creek charger that is creating some "noise" in the panel. I've got a call into Clipper Creek and visit to Chevy on my schedule for tomorrow.
I'm assuming the dedicated GFCI for the heated bathroom floor is on a totally separate circuit? Pretty sure you have more that one GFCI in the house. Weird that only that one trips. Is the one for the bathroom have the GFCI in the main service panel or located somewhere else? Wonder if you have a grounding issue. If you live in the desert like me, sometimes you need to wet your grounding rod. Your info says Indiana, so assuming you have had rain recently. Still might want to go check your outside ground to make sure it's in good condition. Would think the electricians would have checked that. But you never know. Sometimes the low tech stuff gets everyone.
 

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Just as a note:
A GFCI does not look at, measure, or have anything to do with the ground in a circuit. It measures the difference between the hot and neutral load on a circuit and if too far different, will trip.
 
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